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Deadlock in Korea: Canadians at War, 1950-1953 Paperback – Jan 28 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: CDG Books Canada, Inc. / Macmillan Canada (Jan. 28 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0771576757
  • ISBN-13: 978-0771576751
  • Product Dimensions: 22.4 x 14.2 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 458 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,369,291 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Ted Barris brings us a vivid account of one of the century's most important, but often overlooked, conflicts. Canada played a key role, and the contributions of this country's brave warriors are recognized at last.

... transports the reader to the front lines... Barris's book stands as a fitting memorial to an almost forgotten war.

... readers will enjoy (and admire) the personal recollections of battles where young Canadian soldiers were the difference between defeat and glory the latter being the norm. (Major-General Lewis MacKenzie)

... well-researched, exciting and compassionate... the author leaves the reader with much to ponder. He does this through word pictures that are much more evocative than the yellowed snapshots of the debacle that we have all seen. His description of front-line fighting is at times chilling, similar in many respects to scenes in Saving Private Ryan. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

In 1950, nearly 25,000, Canadians signed on for a UN-sponsored "police-action" to stop Communist incursion into South Korea. They joined a multi-national expeditionary force that quickly found itself embroiled in a full-scale war. Members of the Canadian navy, airforce and infantry fought with distinction and endured months of bloody stalemate that ultimately stopped the communists but failed to requite the people of the Korean peninsula - with consequences that continue to haunt the world today.

Ted Barris interviewed hundreds of Korean War veterans to gather their stories of heroism and survival, tragedy and absurdity, successes and SNAFUs. He has woven their tales into a fascinating look at a war that many have forgotten.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By sixtring on Oct. 15 2001
Format: Paperback
The Canadian troops in Korea may have been few in number, but they had their share of challenges and hardships. Canada's Korea experience largely coincided with the relatively static and nasty trench warfare period of 1951-53. Through no fault of these troops, history ascribes to them no major combat laurels. But their long-overlooked story is no less compelling than that of other U.N. contingents in the Korean War. Barris has done a commendable job of presenting a complete and balanced history without hyperbole. Accordingly, the reader is given an appreciation of 1950 recruiting and (in many ways comical) training; the horrific train accident in transporting troops westward through the Canadaian Rockies; the Pacific crossing and deployment in Korea, and the combat histories of the regiments that rotated through over a three-year period. The passage about the Canadians' role in guarding communist POWs gives insight rarely found elsewhere. Anecdotal information from individual interviews is what gives the book its real depth. These passages give interesting details about bivouac experiences, uniform and weapons selection, and connectivity with other allied armies. Another unique provision recounts how these young soldiers came face-to-face with their enemies just hours after the armistice. The saga of the Canadian troops would be incomplete without some recognition of individual's post-war adjustments. Barris has covered all of these very well. The vintage photos are poor in resolution but informative nevertheless. The maps are great and are indispensible for a text like this. In all, this very readable book on a subject that has been chronically overlooked until now.
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By sixtring on Oct. 15 2001
Format: Paperback
The Canadian troops in Korea may have been few in number, but they had their share of challenges and hardships. Canada's Korea experience largely coincided with the relatively static and nasty trench warfare period of 1951-53. Through no fault of these troops, history ascribes to them no major combat laurels. But their long-overlooked story is no less compelling than that of other U.N. contingents in the Korean War. Barris has done a commendable job of presenting a complete and balanced history without hyperbole. Accordingly, the reader is given an appreciation of 1950 recruiting and (in many ways comical) training; the horrific train accident in transporting troops westward through the Canadaian Rockies; the Pacific crossing and deployment in Korea, and the combat histories of the regiments that rotated through over a three-year period. The passage about the Canadians' role in guarding communist POWs gives insight rarely found elsewhere. Anecdotal information from individual interviews is what gives the book its real depth. These passages give interesting details about bivouac experiences, uniform and weapons selection, and connectivity with other allied armies. Another unique provision recounts how these young soldiers came face-to-face with their enemies just hours after the armistice. The saga of the Canadian troops would be incomplete without some recognition of individuals' post-war adjustments. Barris has covered all of these very well. The vintage photos are poor in resolution but informative nevertheless. The maps are great and are indispensible for a text like this. In all, this very readable book on a subject that has been chronically overlooked until now.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Finally with just a little politics, the book goes right into combat and all the different battles the Canadians had to fight. Yes, in the beginning of the book is why we went to Korea, but I was looking for a book with the battles and I found it. This is that book.
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Ted Barris has written several books on Canada's role in WWi,WWII and the Korean War. We owe it to ourselves and to the people who fought to read all of his books
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
A Book Long Overdue Oct. 15 2001
By sixtring - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
The Canadian troops in Korea may have been few in number, but they had their share of challenges and hardships. Canada's Korea experience largely coincided with the relatively static and nasty trench warfare period of 1951-53. Through no fault of these troops, history ascribes to them no major combat laurels. But their long-overlooked story is no less compelling than that of other U.N. contingents in the Korean War. Barris has done a commendable job of presenting a complete and balanced history without hyperbole. Accordingly, the reader is given an appreciation of 1950 recruiting and (in many ways comical) training; the horrific train accident in transporting troops westward through the Canadaian Rockies; the Pacific crossing and deployment in Korea, and the combat histories of the regiments that rotated through over a three-year period. The passage about the Canadians' role in guarding communist POWs gives insight rarely found elsewhere. Anecdotal information from individual interviews is what gives the book its real depth. These passages give interesting details about bivouac experiences, uniform and weapons selection, and connectivity with other allied armies. Another unique provision recounts how these young soldiers came face-to-face with their enemies just hours after the armistice. The saga of the Canadian troops would be incomplete without some recognition of individual's post-war adjustments. Barris has covered all of these very well. The vintage photos are poor in resolution but informative nevertheless. The maps are great and are indispensible for a text like this. In all, this very readable book on a subject that has been chronically overlooked until now.

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