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Death in Gaza


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Product Details

  • Directors: James Miller
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, DVD-Video, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: Arabic, English, Hebrew
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : Ages 14 and over
  • Studio: HBO
  • Release Date: Feb. 21 2006
  • Run Time: 80 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000BBOU90
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #67,731 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Death in Gaza (DVD)

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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Folantin on Oct. 31 2006
Format: DVD
British filmmaker James Miller traveled to Palestine in 2003 to make a documentary about the affect of violence on the lives of Palestinian children. He also planned to make a companion film about Israeli children. Tragically, Miller was shot and killed by Israeli forces in Rafah while making his documentary. Consequently, the film's focus was diverted from its initial purpose. What remains is a film that is partially a tribute to the bravery and commitment of Miller, and partially a story about the poisoned lives of children growing up in Palestine.

The camera captures the atmosphere of the streets. Walls are covered with posters of militants and those killed in the conflict. When the sun sets, there's an unearthly scene as the street vendors disappear and then "paramilitaries come out at night using the dead to recruit more militants." Of course, those recruited are usually young males--some still in childhood. In one horrific scene, Saira Shah--also the film's narrator--is brave enough to interview some hooded Palestinian paramilitaries who are grooming Ahmed, a young boy to join their ranks. The paramilitaries play games with the boy and the games slide into teaching him how to hold a rocket grenade launcher. When Shah asks if it is moral to recruit young children to be terrorists, the hooded paramilitary member strokes the boy's head and chillingly responds, "don't worry about responsibility, sister, we're men, when we say goodbye to Ahmed, there are 1000s more like him."

The film shows quite clearly that children on the streets of Palestine are well aware of imminent death and that their lives are irrevocably altered by their day-to-day existence--it is common for children to write letters to their families in case they are killed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hu Xiali on April 20 2006
Format: DVD
The movie "Death in Gaza" shocked everyone. Even if we always hear about the news about the conflict in Mid-East throuth various media, we still cannot feel how barbarous the war and people are like until we watch the movie. When I saw people dying or injuring during the conflicts on TV before, I just shook my head and feel sympathized with them. These days, however, I always think about it. It is easy for me to relate the real scene appearing in the movie...
The conflicts in Gaza is a problem for us to solve.
We are all humans, not the watchers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tom Jiang on April 20 2006
Format: DVD
This is my first time watching such a excellent documentary.I've never experienced a real war in my life cause I live in a peaceful country having no sence of blood and bullets.I can not image how the life of children in Gaza.The war is always around them,death of friends and relatives have make their nerves become numbly.Their minds are full of fury.Even games they play show us thier desire of being a martyr.
This is a movie for awake all the people who living in the peace,no body colud miss it.
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By delia ruhe on July 15 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
*Death in Gaza* is an excellent documentary for anyone wanting to get a glimpse inside the lives of those stone-throwing Palestinian boys frequently featured in television news footage. When stones are all the weapons you have against Israeli tanks and bulldozers, and when throwing them can get you either shot or sentenced to hard time in an Israeli jail, you need a philosophy that can make sense of your life under brutal military occupation. These boys have one -- and it's not all that different from the Israeli notion that "it is better to die with a weapon in your hand" than without one.

The film focuses primarily on two twelve-year-olds, Mohammed and Ahmed (and secondarily on a 16-year-old girl, Najla). The dreams and hopes of these boys do not seem all that different from those of our own kids, but Palestinian youngsters also know that they will have no chance of fulfilling those dreams without an end to the occupation. So they dedicate themselves to it, dealing with their considerable fear by drawing strength from their Islamic faith and their strong bond of friendship with each other, preparing themselves for the future and jihad. But given the astonishing number of Palestinian children already slaughtered by Israeli troops, the boys find it even more crucial to cleave to their community's conviction that death by occupation does not create victims but rather, martyrs to the heroic cause of Palestinian liberation. How else to shore up the battered psyche against the gratuitous and unpredictable acts of violence perpetrated against them?

The setting of this film is the desolate refugee camp at Rafah, where we get a brief glimpse of the dark side of the Palestinian resistance -- one that is sure to please a Zionist or otherwise Islamophobic audience.
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Format: DVD
This is the opinion from Frank in D-Block. I knew some news from Isreal and Palestine, but before watching this DVD, I thought that is OK there. Then when I watching this DVD, the scences are really shake my mind. The city (they called the place a city) for people to live is soo poor. Israeli tanks are on the road, the Palestinian children are follow them and chuck them. Then the Israeli soldiers shoot those children. That seems the all day for Palestinian children to live.
The reason for why I think there won't have peace in next 60-year is, those Palestinian children are hate Israeli. If they get a chance to kill any Israeli, they will do it even though it will take their life. Life for them is to be a hero in their land. And the main thing is they're only 12-15 years old, that means they will have the same opinion for next 60 years. and the worst thing is they will teach their children to think like them. So on and so on, how could these two countries have a peace in the next 60 years?
Right now, the only thing I can do is wish. Wish there will be a peace in the future.
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