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Death Note Black Edition, Vol. 1 Paperback – Dec 28 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: VIZ Media LLC (Dec 28 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1421539640
  • ISBN-13: 978-1421539645
  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 3.6 x 19 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 422 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #44,285 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Born in Tokyo, Tsugumi Ohba is the author of the hit series Death Note. His current series Bakuman., is serialized in Weekly Shonen Jump.

Takeshi Obata was born in 1969 Nigata, Japan, and is the artist of the widly popular SHONEN JUMP title Hikaru no Go, which won the 2003 Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize: Shinsei "New Hope" and the 2000 Shogakukan Manga award. Obata is also the artist of Arabian Majin Bokentan Lamp Lamp, Ayasturi Sakon, Cyborg Jichan G., and the smash hit manga Death Note. His current series  Bakuman is serialized in the Weekly Shonen Jump.

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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Quang on April 12 2011
Format: Paperback
A thrilling reading experience.
Introduction:
Death Note is about a 17-years old high school Light Yagami who seeks justice by killing criminals with his death note book. This special notebook, which was dropped by a Death God, has the power to kill anyone by writing the name of that person on it and have the picture of that person's face on the writer's mind. Seeing as many criminals die all of the sudden, the police and detectives suspect that there is actually someone plot this criminal massacre. L, a very smart and mysterious 17 years old guy, joins the case and help the police finding the mastermind.

Read on to find out how L and the police solves the case!

About this Black Edition:
This new Black Edition puts 2 of the original Death Note volume into one, with a few bonus color page and bigger frame reading size. The book's cover and all the sides has black color which make it look real nice and unique on your bookshelve. Also, it's cheaper to buy this edition than buying individual volumes. I am very pleased with this edition's quality. I recommend anyone interested in the series buy this edition!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Nicola Mansfield HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Feb. 14 2011
Format: Paperback
Reason for Reading: The plot line had me sold on this one right away.

Wow! Wow! Wow! I was expecting a good story but I got a heck of lot more than I was prepared for. First of all, I was expecting a horror story and I guess, because of the supernatural angle, one could loosely term it horror. But when you get down to it, this is a wicked serial killer thriller with a supernatural element on the side. The serial killer's character and the detecting are much more the driving force of the story than the paranormal setting in which the story is based.

A bored Shinigami, God of Death, leaves a Death Note on the ground for someone to pick up. Light Yagami, brilliant ace student, is the one who does so and the notebook contains information upon its use. When a person's name is written in the book they will die. The human owner of the notebook is also able to see the Shinigami owner and Light and Ryuk become constant companions, as Ryuk is here to watch what happens to brighten his otherwise boring existence.

Ryuk, a creepy looking guy to say the least, has no powers that he is willing to use. He is not on Light's side, nor anyone's for that matter. He's simply a bystander, though he does give Light information now and then, at his own convenience. As Ryuk watches Light become both a serial killer and a mass murderer, killing first only criminals "who deserve to die anyway" and then killing more methodically to keep those who seek to track him down from finding him out, we become attached to his character. Light on the other hand, we watch descend into a pit of psychosis as the power he wields proves too strong for his character to bear. And then there is "L". The mysterious detective who is called upon occasionally to solve the unsolvable cases the police just can't solve.
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By Wade A TOP 500 REVIEWER on Jan. 7 2015
Format: Paperback
Manga is still a new art form to me, I'm more accustomed to the Comic Book format and just started dabbling into manga. I found this recently for cheap and of course I've still heard about Deathnote even if I wasn't into manga. I finally sat down and gave this a read and found that I loved it!

This book is a brilliant chess match between a young boy who stumbles upon a notebook capable of killing anyone as long as you picture their face and write their name down, and a genius shut in who spends his time solving the world's unsolvable cases. There is a very creepy looking fellow in the book which is basically a god and he's the one who dropped this magical notebook into the world. Though he takes a back seat to the creative criminal/detective storyline going on. The book is great in the way it already gives you how the crimes are being committed but keeps you hooked on HOW the shut in detective "L" is going to find out who the killer is.

If you're into crime stories this one is a great one. Wonderful crime story with the supernatural splashed into it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Daegan on Sept. 16 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Great Story
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 30 reviews
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
The Definitive Edition of Death Note Jan. 16 2014
By Omnizoa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The manga is excellent, no question, however this review is regarding the quality of the book itself.

Design:
The Black Editions appear just as they should, they feature a basic cover with a headshot of one of the major characters unique to each book (Light, Ryuk, L, Misa, Mello, and Near in that order), and eschew the original spine design which each featured a different shinigami that most often did not play a role in the story (exceptions being 1 Ryuk, 4 Gelus, 5 Rem, and 9 Sidoh). The books are stripped of their extraneous content including ads, Shonen Jump subscription cards, "Last Time on Death Note...", and "In The Next Volume..." pages leaving only Death Note to keep your attention. The overall design is nothing but appropriately ominous leaving sparce white text on a black field reminicent of the Death Notes themselves, even the edges of the pages are black, easily setting the books apart from anything else on your shelf.

Content:
The primary feature is that the Black Editions serve as two-packs, each of the 6 containing two of the original 12 books of content. The books are also about 1 inch taller and 3/4ths of an inch deeper, this means the original pages are printed larger and in higher quality. The opening pages that were inked in color for Shonen Jump are back in color now, having been grayscaled in the original release. A couple art pages have been added, however these come at the cost of the original books' front cover art which do not make reappearances, even as art pages. The art on the original back covers do make reappearances, having always been art pages to bookend each chapter, however these are not in color.

Material:
The higher quality paper is nothing to write home about as the difference is slight, however it's worth noting that the quality is significantly better than some similar rereleases such as Naruto's 3-in-1 omnbuses which cram 3 books together with very thin paper. The biggest drawback to this rerelease is surely it's cover material. The covers feature the same matte finish that appeared on the original books (unlike the glossy covers on Naruto) and consequently fingerprints and nail scratches are much more visible, especially considering the covers predominantly black. In addition to this, it's obvious that the inking process that was used to render the edges of the pages black was done with the cover on. Because of this, ink stains are visible all along the outer edges of the front and back cover. These may not be immediately noticeable at a glance, but if there is a silver lining to this, it's that the books should handle age very well. The page edges will not appear to yellow under a layer of black ink and inevitable damage to the cover will blend in with the ink stains. If the end result is a great book that resembles a battered old tome, the venture will have been a success. Ultimately however, the choice to ink the page edges was poor. It looks more like a block than a Death Note, and it would qualify no less for the title of "Black Edition" without it.

Judgment:
All things considered, the Black Editions present a streamlined and convenient re-packaging of the original books, and lose little in the process. I would have liked to see the original cover art reappear as pages and the all of the originally colored art pages return in full color, but the larger pages and two-in-one format are more than fair compensation. The inked page edges is a sticking point, but it certainly warrants the unqiue title of "Black Edition" and if nothing else will certainly provoke more than one "What are you reading?" questions, to which you will always have a good answer.
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Wow! Read This Series Now! Feb. 14 2011
By Nicola Mansfield - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Reason for Reading: The plot line had me sold on this one right away.

Wow! Wow! Wow! I was expecting a good story but I got a heck of lot more than I was prepared for. First of all, I was expecting a horror story and I guess, because of the supernatural angle, one could loosely term it horror. But when you get down to it, this is a wicked serial killer thriller with a supernatural element on the side. The serial killer's character and the detecting are much more the driving force of the story than the paranormal setting in which the story is based.

A bored Shinigami, God of Death, leaves a Death Note on the ground for someone to pick up. Light Yagami, brilliant ace student, is the one who does so and the notebook contains information upon its use. When a person's name is written in the book they will die. The human owner of the notebook is also able to see the Shinigami owner and Light and Ryuk become constant companions, as Ryuk is here to watch what happens to brighten his otherwise boring existence.

Ryuk, a creepy looking guy to say the least, has no powers that he is willing to use. He is not on Light's side, nor anyone's for that matter. He's simply a bystander, though he does give Light information now and then, at his own convenience. As Ryuk watches Light become both a serial killer and a mass murderer, killing first only criminals "who deserve to die anyway" and then killing more methodically to keep those who seek to track him down from finding him out, we become attached to his character. Light on the other hand, we watch descend into a pit of psychosis as the power he wields proves too strong for his character to bear. And then there is "L". The mysterious detective who is called upon occasionally to solve the unsolvable cases the police just can't solve. No one knows his real name, nor have they ever seen him, until now. "L" always gets his man and this time he takes on a small police task force and together the police do the legwork while "L" matches wits with Light to try and find the one mistake he has made that will let "L" capture him.

An absolutely awesome thriller. I'm even more excited to have found this series now knowing it is a detective/serial killer/thriller more than a horror story. I am very interested in the three main characters. There is a lot of room for them to grow and expand and whether they stay on their current good/evil/neutral paths is something I am pondering. My favourite character at the moment is Ryuk. Yes! The god of death, can you believe it? He is actually quite funny and his ugliness grows on you by the end of the book. This is a must read for manga fans. A classic!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
The Beginning of a Great Series June 4 2012
By marypinchotmeyer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Death Note is a great series because it deals with important issues of right, wrong, the desire for power and control and death, in the context of a very intelligent boy and his demon attempting to outwit law enforcement. The books contain wonderful and well-plotted twists and turns and excellent graphics. Death Note became a popular television series in Japan and I wish a Joss Whedon type would address it for American television. For those not familiar with this form of book, it reads from back to front but that is not a problem. The books are also visually attractive with black and white covers and black edges. The best series since Lone Wolf and Cub. The same high praise applies to all of the volumes in the series.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Amazon Service = A++ March 14 2013
By Sin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Product-wise, I have no complaints as this is a great book from an amazing series. If you're unsure about trying this series out, I can assure you that you won't have regrets if you're a fan of 'darker' genre in Manga. It's got a dark plot, but it's a mystery written with tact, and is as popular a series as it is for a reason ;D

If you're still on the fence though, I can tell you that Amazon has great customer service values. I had forgotten that I had purchased an EXACT copy last year and when I went to return the newly purchased one, I was given a message to simply keep the book and STILL get a refund. Can't say this will always be the case for everyone, but it does support their outstanding service values in my opinion. It's great to know I can shop easy and with peace of mind =D
Visually stunning, definitely recommended Aug. 23 2014
By Clay R. Haase - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Death Note is without a doubt one of those mangas that practically everyone has at least heard about. No wonder too, the story is interesting and attention-catching. The plot is centered on Light Yagami, who finds a notebook with which he can kill people by writing their names on it, and the police investigation that attempts to put an end to his criminal killing and bring him to justice. It is deep, interesting, with a well-developed plot, and absolutely memorable. This manga is, story-wise and art-wise, fantastic. There is no question about it, and a review based purely on the story would be pointless considering the sheer amount of great existing ones already. I definitely recommend a fan of manga or just purely great works to read this comic. Because of this, this review will be about the quality of the Black Edition book itself and how it compares to the physical tomes. I will note here that I have both the hardback and paperback editions of the black edition, as well as some older volumes of the normal version of the comic.

The design of the Black Editions is just as they should, and feature a basic cover with a headshot of each of the major characters (Light, Ryuk, L, Misa, Mello, and Near). The spine, unlike the normal volumes, doesn’t feature a different shinigami in each volume, but a simpler and neater and simpler design. It seems, in a visual way, to be more reminiscent in this sense of the Death Note itself: formal, elegant, and with a somewhat ominous tone that goes along with the story itself. This extends to the visual look of the pages of the book, which from the outside are completely black.

The main feature of the Black Edition is that in each volume it serves as a two-pack, and in the six published volumes it contains the original 12 books of contents. The books are taller and wider, and the art in the pages is in this way scaled along with the pages – thus becoming easier to appreciate the detail of the art and the text itself – and makes it easier to hold than the original volumes. Several art pages are added at the cost of the original covers of the original volumes featuring the characters (though these do make reappearances at the end of the chapters, but not in colour).

The difference of material with the original releases is slight, though when compared to rereleases of other similar series (such as the Naruto 3-in-1 volumes) it is noteworthy that the Death Note Black Edition isn’t use as much thin paper. The paperback version, due to its choice of material in the cover – which although I like has a very significant visual impact – appears more as a block of sorts, making me prefer the hardback edition of these volumes because of their visual impact (though this is a conclusion I often get when comparing hardback and paperback editions of different books).

All things considered, the Death Note black edition is a great streamlined and convenient package of the original volumes. The increased size makes for an easier reading experience, and no matter what version (paperback or hardback) it looks visually stunning. The coloured art in some pages look great, as do the other black and white areas of the volume because of the increased quality. Though absence of the cover art of the original volumes was missed, I definitely recommend purchasing these volumes for reading or collecting. They look wonderful and will make for a great addition to any library, plus are easier to hold and read than the original release. As such I give it 4 out of 5 stars as applied to the volumes and materials themselves, rather than the story. The story, though not one of my absolute favourites, is definitely worth reading and deserves the highest rating.


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