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Deep Red (Widescreen)


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1 new from CDN$ 118.00 5 used from CDN$ 15.99

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Product Details

  • Actors: David Hemmings, Daria Nicolodi, Gabriele Lavia, Macha Méril, Eros Pagni
  • Directors: Dario Argento
  • Writers: Dario Argento, Bernardino Zapponi
  • Producers: Claudio Argento, Salvatore Argento
  • Format: Dolby, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: Italian
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: All RegionsAll Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Hgv Video Production
  • Release Date: Sept. 9 2003
  • Run Time: 126 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (85 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6305807957
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #59,687 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)


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4.1 out of 5 stars
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Matthew Brown on Oct. 22 2004
Format: DVD
People weren't lying when they said this was Argento's masterpiece. Everything from murder scences to the ones where people were just talking kept me in interest. Once again the music was incredible. All of Argento's music in his movies seem to be well done. The ending of this movie was fantastic! I enjoyed this film a lot more then Tenebrae because it was more interesting. This movie made more sense..and kept me in suspence more. I don't know why some people said that this movie is boring, because it is not.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By math climber on April 23 2004
Format: DVD
After thirty years from its original appearance in 1975, Profondo Rosso (as Deep Red is titled in Italian) is still an exciting movie to watch. Unlike many of Argento's subsequent movies, Deep Red's plot is very well constructed, and the careful viewer (well...the VERY careful viewer) can pick up at least two crucial clues. The first, in the very first minutes of the movie, is central to the plot, but it is very easy to miss. It makes for a nice challenge to the first time viewer. Deep Red marks, in my opinion, the highest level of Argento's work. The atmosphere of the movie is greatly enhanced by the first collaboration of Argento with the musical group Goblin. A great soundtrack. I saw this movie first when I was a young student. Now,I saw it again to keep me company during my weekly long run on the treadmill. It made the run exciting, and time just flew!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lunar Strain on Feb. 14 2004
Format: DVD
Though I truely wanted to like this film, I just had a hard time doing so. I usually like Argento films. I loved Suspiria, Inferno, and Phenomena and I read that Deep Red was one of his best, so I bought it. I for one thought this uncut version would be great, but it's actually the cut material spliced back in the film that hinders it, at least for me. The newly restored material was never dubbed, so through out the entire film we get little pieces here and there spliced in that are spoken Italian with subtitles. It's really annoying because the characters will be talking in English at one moment and then suddenlly halfway through their sentence, their voice changes sound and they are speaking Italian. I found this quite annoying and distracting because it takes you out of the film. Also most of the "new" restored material doesn't add a whole lot to the film. Most of it is just talking that adds really nothing new to the plot. I would have probably liked this film better if I saw the cut version, which is strange for me to say because I usually like "extended" versions of films. Overall Deep Red had plenty of style but little substance. I can see why die-hard Argento fans like this film because it is thick with his style, but for casual fans like me, we have seen him do much better. I for one found this film to drag and, should I dare say, get boring in some parts. People new to Argento are better to start off somewhere else.
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By N. Torres on Jan. 20 2004
Format: DVD
One of Argento's finest giallos ever! I just can't say enough about this movie! I am going to issue a 5 star rating to counter-balance the trolls who come here and post un-helpful reviews! Eat this!
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Format: DVD
1. When you hear a child singing, you are about to die horribly.
2. When you see a woman being beaten to death with a meat cleaver, the most sensible course of action is to run immediately to the scene (preferably unarmed).
3. If you find yourself being chased around by a hatchet-wielding maniac, remember that elevators make good weapons.
4. Jazz pianists are unbelievably dim-witted.
The thing to remember about Dario Argento's movies is that style is treated with more importance than plot or dialogue. "Deep Red" has little in the way of original plot (owing much to Antonioni's "Blow Up" or Argento's own "The Bird With The Crystal Plumage"), and some of the interaction between David Hemmings and Daria Nicolodi is painful to watch and listen to. The fact that the language sometimes switches back and forth between Italian and English in the middle of a scene is only a minor distraction, but it doesn't do much in the film's favour.
I can't agree with those who describe this as Argento's best, but it's still a very entertaining couple of hours (probably closer to 3.5 stars). Inventive killings, several red herrings to keep the viewer on edge (including one which, admittedly, is so blindingly obvious that it made me wonder how Hemmings' character took so long to realise it himself - see point 4 above), and an underlying sense of malice running through the entire film make for an uncomfortable experience....but it's uncomfortable in a good way. A word of warning, though: if you're *too* perceptive, you'll know the killer's identity very early in the movie. It's a question of knowing where to look.
Aside from the constant switching between languages, my only real gripe with the film would be its soundtrack.
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Format: DVD
I really couldn't tell you why I have yet to watch every film in Dario Argento's filmography, but by watching "Deep Red," I am finally starting to make some inroads into his body of work. It was easy to claim ignorance of many of this Italian director's important works a few years ago because it was difficult to find them anywhere, let alone in an uncut form. Fortunately, DVD arrived on the scene and eager film fans with dollars to spend inspired numerous companies to start churning out any movie they could get their hands. Even Troma, the flagship of flaccid filmmaking, released a so-so version of Argento's "The Stendhal Syndrome." It wasn't too long before practically every Argento film arrived on store shelves, many of them in uncut, unrated formats. Unfortunately, most viewers have most likely never heard of Dario Argento. These days, more people are familiar with the director's beautiful daughter Asia than with the horror maestro himself. What a shame. Argento's films, at least the ones I have seen, are masterpieces of style injected with truly cringe inducing violence. For a few years in the 1980s and 1990s, Argento drifted away from his tried and true giallo formula, only recently returning to some semblance of form with "Stendhal" and "Sleepless." "Deep Red" is Argento firmly entrenched in his giallo prime, a movie loaded with black-gloved killings, intricate plot twists and turns, and atmosphere so think you can cut it with a knife.
Starring David Hemmings (who recently passed away) and Dario's real life squeeze Daria Nicolodi, "Deep Red" continually reminded me of his first picture, "The Bird With the Crystal Plumage" because Argento presents with essentially the same set up.
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