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Deep Red (Widescreen) [Import]

4.1 out of 5 stars 86 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: David Hemmings, Daria Nicolodi, Gabriele Lavia, Macha Méril, Eros Pagni
  • Directors: Dario Argento
  • Writers: Dario Argento, Bernardino Zapponi
  • Producers: Claudio Argento, Salvatore Argento
  • Format: Dolby, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC, Import
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: All RegionsAll Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Anchor Bay
  • Release Date: Sept. 9 2003
  • Run Time: 126 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars 86 customer reviews
  • ASIN: 6305807957
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Product Description

Amazon.ca

Considered by many to be Dario Argento's first masterpiece, Deep Red recalls his first hit, The Bird with the Crystal Plumage. British star David Hemmings (Blow-Up) plays an American jazz pianist who witnesses a brutal, bloody murder from afar and turns detective to find the killer. Kooky Italian journalist Daria Nicolodi (Argento's wife and cowriter on Suspiria) joins him as comic relief and tepid romantic interest, but the real costar is Argento's high style: gliding camera, razor-sharp editing, and gorgeous but gruesome set pieces. The story is convoluted, to say the least--plotting was never Argento's strong suit and the unnecessary exposition often drags the film down--but his vivid, horrific imagery is perfect for a thriller driven by haunting memories. Deep Red was originally released in the U.S. in a severely cut version retitled The Hatchet Murders (odd since the killer uses a butcher's knife). Producer Bill Lustig has restored the film to its original two-hour-plus running time, though some scenes exist only with Italian-language soundtracks (which are subtitled). It's a bit jarring at first (it makes for an unintended joke when a man suddenly checks his hearing aid after a language switch), but it's the only way to see Argento's original cut. There's also a brief 25th anniversary documentary with Argento and cowriter Bernardino Zapponi, and the DVD offers a choice of English and Italian language versions. --Sean Axmaker

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
After thirty years from its original appearance in 1975, Profondo Rosso (as Deep Red is titled in Italian) is still an exciting movie to watch. Unlike many of Argento's subsequent movies, Deep Red's plot is very well constructed, and the careful viewer (well...the VERY careful viewer) can pick up at least two crucial clues. The first, in the very first minutes of the movie, is central to the plot, but it is very easy to miss. It makes for a nice challenge to the first time viewer. Deep Red marks, in my opinion, the highest level of Argento's work. The atmosphere of the movie is greatly enhanced by the first collaboration of Argento with the musical group Goblin. A great soundtrack. I saw this movie first when I was a young student. Now,I saw it again to keep me company during my weekly long run on the treadmill. It made the run exciting, and time just flew!
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Format: DVD
People weren't lying when they said this was Argento's masterpiece. Everything from murder scences to the ones where people were just talking kept me in interest. Once again the music was incredible. All of Argento's music in his movies seem to be well done. The ending of this movie was fantastic! I enjoyed this film a lot more then Tenebrae because it was more interesting. This movie made more sense..and kept me in suspence more. I don't know why some people said that this movie is boring, because it is not.
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By Omnes TOP 500 REVIEWER on Dec 4 2015
Format: Blu-ray
After failing his only historical-comedy "Le Cinque Giornate", it was important for Dario Argento to come back on top of the movie game. And boy did he succeed his goal with Profondo Rosso. Much preferable to watch in its 127 minutes italian version which is complete rather than the mutilated International Version that lasts 105 minutes, Profondo Rosso is the story of Marc Daly, a pianist teaching in Rome's Conservatory who stumbles on a murder his neighbor, the spiritualist Helga Ullmann, suffers from a psychopath wearing nothing but a deep red coat and hiding his face behind a hat. Entering the woman's apartment, Marc fails in rescuing Ullmann's life, although with the help of a journalist called Gianna Brazzi, he will try to find the truth behind this murder as to who is the killer, especially as the medium made a shocking scene at her latest conference as she felt among the public the presence of a murderer. A person who might be linked to the murder. Might even be Helga's killer!

If one has to compare Profondo Rosso with all of Argento's earlier giallos, it is interesting to see how Dario combined together the best plot devices in his Animal trilogy, but also went up as he made this movie more of a thriller-music video detective story. Indeed, with Profondo Rosso's spectacular experimental Rock theme and Gaslini's piano compositions, the movie pintpoints again to one of Dario's strengths. Clever combination of music with images, a spectacle for the ears and for the eyes. Even more interesting is how this movie has a different vibe from his earlier films and his later work. For more than being a genre story, a certain neo-realistic touch happens during the film.
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Format: DVD
I really couldn't tell you why I have yet to watch every film in Dario Argento's filmography, but by watching "Deep Red," I am finally starting to make some inroads into his body of work. It was easy to claim ignorance of many of this Italian director's important works a few years ago because it was difficult to find them anywhere, let alone in an uncut form. Fortunately, DVD arrived on the scene and eager film fans with dollars to spend inspired numerous companies to start churning out any movie they could get their hands. Even Troma, the flagship of flaccid filmmaking, released a so-so version of Argento's "The Stendhal Syndrome." It wasn't too long before practically every Argento film arrived on store shelves, many of them in uncut, unrated formats. Unfortunately, most viewers have most likely never heard of Dario Argento. These days, more people are familiar with the director's beautiful daughter Asia than with the horror maestro himself. What a shame. Argento's films, at least the ones I have seen, are masterpieces of style injected with truly cringe inducing violence. For a few years in the 1980s and 1990s, Argento drifted away from his tried and true giallo formula, only recently returning to some semblance of form with "Stendhal" and "Sleepless." "Deep Red" is Argento firmly entrenched in his giallo prime, a movie loaded with black-gloved killings, intricate plot twists and turns, and atmosphere so think you can cut it with a knife.
Starring David Hemmings (who recently passed away) and Dario's real life squeeze Daria Nicolodi, "Deep Red" continually reminded me of his first picture, "The Bird With the Crystal Plumage" because Argento presents with essentially the same set up.
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Format: DVD
Let me begin by stating that stylistically this film approaches art. Others have noted that Argento is the "Italian Hitchcock," and while there are plenty of Hitchcock-like elements, such a title is really too limiting. Argento was not afraid to steal good ideas. Hitchcock can be seen in his camera angles during knife attacks, his first-person murder viewpoint, the steamy attack in a bathroom, the death of the attacking bird, etc,; Hopper inspired a life-size version of his painting "Nighthawks" in the middle of an Italian piazza; Munch can be seen in the paintings on the wall; and Sergio Leone (whom Argento worked with on the great "Once Upon a Time in the West") definitely impacted Argento's sweeping panoramic shots. Together they add up to a fantastically stylish production that is unique to the horror genre. The incongrous mixture of beauty and death makes the film that much more macabre. I especially enjoyed the bright red that marks the parapsychology conference and the blue of the bathroom scene.
Argento's choice of Goblin to perform the music was a risky, yet inspired, one. In their soundtrack you can easily hear the strains of the music that would one day make the movie Halloween one of the scariest ever made. Repetitive and intense, it almost becomes a character in the movie, driving the action forward. That being said, at times the band overplayed it's hand, if you will. There are several scenes where the music becomes too loud and verges on annoying. Still, it is worth a listen.
Now for the down part: while Argento was a masterful director, I personally found the plotline to be a bit cheesy and was never scared or anxious during the entire movie.
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