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Deliverance [Blu-ray] [Import]


Price: CDN$ 31.55 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Deliverance [Blu-ray] [Import] + Full Metal Jacket [Blu-ray] (Bilingual)
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Product Details

  • Format: NTSC, Import
  • Language: English, French, Spanish
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • Release Date: June 26 2012
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (120 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B007L2UQJK

Product Description

Amazon.ca

One of the key films of the 1970s, John Boorman's Deliverance is a nightmarish adaptation of poet-novelist James Dickey's book about various kinds of survival in modern America. The story concerns four Atlanta businessmen of various male stripe: Jon Voight's character is a reflective, civilized fellow, Burt Reynolds plays a strapping hunter-gatherer in urban clothes, Ned Beatty is a sweaty, weak-willed boy-man, and Ronny Cox essays a spirited, neighborly type. Together they decide to answer the ancient call of men testing themselves against the elements and set out on a treacherous ride on the rapids of an Appalachian river. What they don't understand until it is too late is that they have ventured into Dickey's variation on the American underbelly, a wild, lawless, dangerous (and dangerously inbred) place isolated from the gloss of the late 20th century. In short order, the four men dig deep into their own suppressed primitiveness, defending themselves against armed cretins, facing the shock of real death on their carefully planned, death-defying adventure, and then squarely facing the suspicions of authority over their concealed actions. Boorman, a master teller of stories about individuals on peculiarly mythical journeys, does a terrifying and beautiful job of revealing the complexity of private and collective character--the way one can never be the same after glimpsing the sharp-clawed survivor in one's soul. --Tom Keogh

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By K. Gittins on June 27 2004
Format: DVD
City folk Burt Reynolds (Louis), Jon Voight (Ed), Ronnie Cox (Drew) and Ned Beatty (Bobbie) take a canoe trip down a backwoods Georgia river which will soon be flooded out when a new dam is constructed.
The foursome hire some possibly-inbred hillbillies to drive their cars down to Aintry to be picked up later. Off they go downriver. They encounter small rapids, bugs, and then Ed and Bobby are assaulted by two unpleasant hillbillies. They make Bobbie drop his drawers and squeal like a pig, and tell Ed he has a "real purty mouth". Louis and Drew sneak up on them and kill one of the men as the other runs off.
This leads to a moral dilemma among the four canoers. Do they tell the cops? Do they bury the body and act innocent? They make a decision, and continue downstream. At one point going through some rapids, Drew falls overboard, apparently shot by the second hillbilly, and Louis breaks his leg. Bobby camps out with Louis as Ed climbs up a cliff to reconnoitre and ferret out the second man. Finally, they continue down to Aintry, where they recuperate, and are questioned about their experience.
The screenplay was written by James Dickey based on his book, and he has a small part as the sheriff who wonders what the men had been up to.
Good ensemble acting (probably Burt's best role), beautiful photography and locations, and a great story make this an impressive movie. Oscar nominations for director (John Boorman), picture and editing, and Golden Globe nominations for director, picture, actor (Voight), song ("Dueling Banjos") and screenplay. The reasonably-priced DVD has the R-rated full-screen and wide-screen format movie, a good documentary, English or French language and subtitles, Dolby sound, chapters, cast/crew/production notes, and a trailer.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Greekfreak on July 7 2003
Format: DVD
John Boorman will probably forever be best known as the director who gave us the brillianly conceived screen production of "Excalibur", but in 1971 he came up with this adaptation of James Dickey's novel of the same name, and with the help of four 'game' actors, created one of the best films of all time.
Even if it's not your cup of tea (due to the disturbing nature of the film), it's something everybody should watch at least once. John Voight is the audience member's representation--even if he doesn't say much, he does a great understated acting job, making clear the horror that he feels, and that we feel through him.
Ronny Cox plays the conscience, Burt Reynolds the ego, and Ned Beatty the victim of the human condition, and tied in with the wonderful cinematography, filmed on location in Georgia, this is one of the most suspenseful movies of all time.
It's also famous for the 'Duelling Banjos' scene that opens the film--unforgettable, and it sets the tone for the rest of the film, when Ronny Cox puts it best:
"I'm lost!"
Classic storytelling.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr Vess on July 13 2001
Format: DVD
Living in Europe, I decided to buy this US edition of one of my two favorite films ever (the second one being "Manhunter"), because I was thrilled to see all the extra features present in it (which are absent in the European DVD). When the package arrived, I took the disc out, thinking I would see the perfect edition of "Deliverance"... but I didn't. All the extras are there, and they're wonderful, the picture and sound quality are excellent. So what's wrong? What spoils the pleasure? Apparently, a single decision of some halfwit Warner executive with two-digit IQ. This person, whoever s/he was, decided to cut and distort this thrilling movie, bastardizing it from the original widescreen format (which all DVDs should be in) to an awful, unbearable to watch Pan-Scan, with about 15% of the picture lost! Yes, the movie was damaged and squeezed - assaulted and raped, if you will - because some brain damaged person responsible for issuing the DVD thought someone would prefer the censored Pan-Scan version to the original, full, widescreen one. The box tries to use some tangled semantics in order to cheat the buyer into believing that there is a possibility to switch between the damaged Pan-Scan version and the real widescreen one - which, of course, is not true at all. Only the distorted, cut version is present on the DVD...
I am not saying that this disc is not worth buying - far from that, I'm extremely satisfied with all the extras and featurettes (the European version only has a bare menu and the movie itself). Nevertheless, I still feel cheated since I was naturally assuming I would be getting a widescreen version (after all, it's a DVD release). This is why I'm only giving this release three stars (of course, the movie itself deserves the full five stars and much more).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Joseph Lee #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 9 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
VIDEO:

Deliverance has VC-1 (21 Mbps) 1080p 2.40:1 encode, which is similar to its 35th Anniversary release. The 35th Anniversary release was minted from a new master. Director John Boorman and director of photography Vilmos Zsigmond explain in the included supplements that they intentionally shot Deliverance in a desaturated, soft style, and it certainly looks it. Therefore, don't expect a presentation that is ultra razer sharp, colourful or high-contrast. The print (while not pristine) is generally clean and free of dirt and speckles. On the plus side, daytime exteriors can look great. Colours brighten up, especially fleshtones. Depth improves noticeably, and the detail verges on the lush, with even longshots nicely textured. Only close-ups come near to delivering the kind of high-def we're generally accustomed to these days, but still, compared to all past video versions (especially the horrid pan & scan VHS copies that were available for years), Deliverance has never looked better. (3.5/5)

AUDIO:

Great news! Perhaps learning from their recent blunder on the Unforgiven: 20th Anniversary Edition, Warner has wisely decided to replace the previous blu ray’s lossy mix with a new DTS-HD MA 5.1 lossless track. The rear speakers are more assertive, more arresting even, than in most catalog remixes but never at the expense of the film's original sound design. The chorus of the forest - the chirping, croaking and rustling - join the rhythms of the river - the rushing, surging and roaring - to create an enveloping, unexpectedly immersive soundfield that defies forty years of age. It not only revitalizes Deliverance, it makes it that much more thrilling, harrowing and, eventually, unsettling. Dialogue is mostly clean.
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