CDN$ 36.86 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by Vanderbilt CA

Compare Offers on Amazon
Add to Cart
CDN$ 36.86
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: OMydeals
Add to Cart
CDN$ 39.74
+ CDN$ 3.49 shipping
Sold by: FastMedia "Ships From USA"
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Der Ring Des Nibelungen


Price: CDN$ 36.86
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
3 new from CDN$ 36.86 1 used from CDN$ 11.99

Artists to Watch
Artists to Watch
Be the first to hear about the hottest emerging artists. Featuring ten new artists each month, Artists to Watch will help you stay in the know when it comes to up-and-coming artists. See all of this month's picks

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 10 2001)
  • SPARS Code: ADD
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B00004XT2G
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #38,101 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. The Rhinegold: Lugt, Schwestern! Die Weckerin Lacht in Den Grund - Helen Donath/Edda Moser/Anna Reynolds/Zoltan Kelemen
2. The Rhinegold: Nur Wer Der Minne Macht Ensagt - Helen Donath/Edda Moser/Anna Reynolds
3. The Rhinegold: Der Welt Erbe Gewann Ich Zu Eigen Durch Dich - Zoltan Kelemen/Helen Donath/Edda Moser/Anna Reynolds
4. The Rhinegold: Haltet Den Rauber! - Helen Donath/Edda Moser/Anna Reynolds
5. The Rhinegold: Hor, Wotan, Der Harrenden Wort! - Karl Ridderbusch/Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau/Martti Talvela/Simone Mangelsdorff
6. The Rhinegold: Schwester! Bruder! Rettet! Helft! - Simone Mangelsdorff/Donald Grobe/Robert Kerns/Gerhard Stolze/Josephine Veasey
7. The Rhinegold: Wotan, Gemahl, Unselger Mann! - Josephine Veasey/Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau/Gerhard Stolze/Robert Kerns/Donald Grobe
8. The Rhinegold: (Transformation Music) - BPO/Herbert Von Karajan
9. The Rhinegold: Zur Burg Fuhrt Die Brucke - Donald Grobe
10. The Rhinegold: Abendlich Strahlt Der Sonne Auge - Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau
See all 23 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Siegfried: Dass Der Mein Vater Nicht Ist - Forest Murmurs - Jess Thomas
2. Siegfried: Nun Sing! Ich Lausche Dem Gesang! - Jess Thomas/Catherine Gayer
3. Siegfried: Prld To Act III. - BPO/Herbert Von Karajan
4. Siegfried: Wache, Wala! Wala! Erwach! - Thomas Stewart
5. Siegfried: (Brunnhilde's Awakening: Intro) - BPO/Herbert Von Karajan
6. Siegfried: Heil Dir, Sonne! Heil Dir, Licht! - Helga Dernesch/Jess Thomas
7. Siegfried: Siegfried! Siegfried Seliger Held! - Helga Dernesch/Jess Thomas
8. Twilight Of The Gods: (Orchestral Interlude) - BPO/Herbert Von Karajan
9. Twilight Of The Gods: Zu Neuen Taten, Teurer Helde - Helga Dernesch
10. Twilight Of The Gods: Mehr Gabst Du, Wunderfrau, Als Ich Zu Wahren Weiss - Helge Brilioth/Helga Dernesch
See all 16 tracks on this disc

Product Description

--This text refers to an alternate Audio CD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
Admittedly, it is a daunting task to try to "get into" opera, and even more so with Wagner's Ring. This CD is perfect for the beginner and the more experienced listener for various reasons. First of all, it spoils you somewhat in presenting you with the best pieces of the various operas. These "bleeding chunks" certainly give you a wonderful introduction to the various motifs, and most importantly, are very long pieces. The CD manages to capture several of the different flavors present in Wagner's opera.
Secondly, the CD is worth its price mainly due to Karajan's conducting. After listening to Solti's version of the Ring (also wonderful), I was suprised by the subtle hints he seems to charge through. You can literally hear the galloping of the horse, or subtle musical hints which add a great appreciation and character to the opera. Thus, if you have experienced several other conductors, but have not had the pleasure of Karajan, it would be worth the price.
Unfortunatly, some of the singing is kinda weak. Again, after Solti's Valkyries, you will have a hard time getting into the singing. And again, Karajan's Brunhilde isn't as strong as Solti's, but she still holds her own. Loge, here, sounds like a trickster (though he does sing/speak his words), and the Wotan's are alright.
In conclusion, this is perfect if you want to add flavor to your Wagner listening experience, or just want to know what the big deal is. I, of course, suggest getting one of the DVD's to get the big picture of what is going on (Levine's MET is a good start). So buy and enjoy.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Audio CD
I'm recommending this 2-disc set because it's a sensible, cost-effective introduction to Wagner's masterpiece, Der Ring des Nibelungen, commonly called the Ring. The Ring is a sequential cycle of four operas, Das Rheingold, Die Walkure, Siegfried, and Gotterdammerung. With the exception of Das Rheingold, they are all of great length (Wagner was a colossal egotist who seemed to believe that no opera could be too long if he was its composer). As a result, acquiring and getting familiar with the entire Ring is an expensive and time-consuming proposition (my choice among complete Ring recordings, the landmark Solti/Vienna Philharmonic set on Decca/London, is 14 CDs costing around $1...-$...). Wagner purists will object to any attempt to excerpt "highlights" from the Ring, and they do have a point: unlike the standard Italian and French operas, which are readily divisible into recitatives, arias, duets, etc., the Wagner operas do not lend themselves to excerpting, with the result that "highlights" sets like this one are a collection of "bleeding chunks" torn from the body of the whole work.
Nevertheless there is a need for a way to approach the Ring, to be introduced to it and to get its flavor, and this generously filled 2-disc set fills that requirement reasonably well. (Wagner's six most important non-Ring operas are similarly if somewhat less generously highlighted on a Deutsche Grammophon 2-CD set that is a companion volume to this one, drawn from various Deutsche Grammophon complete opera recordings--none conducted by Karajan--so if you buy both sets--4 CDs--you gain at least some exposure to all ten major Wagner operas.)
CD 1 (76'33 in length) gives you 31'11 of Das Rheingold (1968), and 45'20 of Die Walkure (1967), which has long been the most popular of the four Ring operas.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By CarrieB on April 15 2001
Format: Audio CD
I've recently gotten into opera, and have mostly listened to Italian and French opera (with the exception of Die Zauberflote). I started getting tired of all the frilliness of the Italian works, particulary, and decided to give Serious German Opera a go. I've long known the reputation of Wagner; lengthy, intense, heavy, and was a little wary. I figured this CD would be a good choice for an introduction, as it features highlights of the entire Ring cycle. I am neither dissapointed, intimidated nor put off by this recording. The depth of the work is a nice change of pace, and very refreshing. I also have a new found respect for people who sing Wagner, as not all opera singers can sing Wagner.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By D. Dubei on June 11 2002
Format: Audio CD
this is a good way to see why it is worth getting the full Der Ring opera--all 15 CDs! having just the highlights shows you the power and majesty of Wagner's music, but skips the depth and true emotion you get out of listening to the whole opera.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
48 of 50 people found the following review helpful
Good introduction to the Ring, good value Oct. 4 2001
By David A. Kemp - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I'm recommending this 2-disc set because it's a sensible, cost-effective introduction to Wagner's masterpiece, Der Ring des Nibelungen, commonly called the Ring. The Ring is a sequential cycle of four operas, Das Rheingold, Die Walkure, Siegfried, and Gotterdammerung. With the exception of Das Rheingold, they are all of great length (Wagner was a colossal egotist who seemed to believe that no opera could be too long if he was its composer). As a result, acquiring and getting familiar with the entire Ring is an expensive and time-consuming proposition (my choice among complete Ring recordings, the landmark Solti/Vienna Philharmonic set on Decca/London, is 14 CDs costing around $1...-$...). Wagner purists will object to any attempt to excerpt "highlights" from the Ring, and they do have a point: unlike the standard Italian and French operas, which are readily divisible into recitatives, arias, duets, etc., the Wagner operas do not lend themselves to excerpting, with the result that "highlights" sets like this one are a collection of "bleeding chunks" torn from the body of the whole work.
Nevertheless there is a need for a way to approach the Ring, to be introduced to it and to get its flavor, and this generously filled 2-disc set fills that requirement reasonably well. (Wagner's six most important non-Ring operas are similarly if somewhat less generously highlighted on a Deutsche Grammophon 2-CD set that is a companion volume to this one, drawn from various Deutsche Grammophon complete opera recordings--none conducted by Karajan--so if you buy both sets--4 CDs--you gain at least some exposure to all ten major Wagner operas.)
CD 1 (76'33 in length) gives you 31'11 of Das Rheingold (1968), and 45'20 of Die Walkure (1967), which has long been the most popular of the four Ring operas. CD 2 (77'05 in length) gives you 25'56 of Siegfried (1969), and 51'03 of Gotterdammerung (1970). All the music here is drawn from the complete Karajan/Berlin Philharmonic Ring on Deutsche Grammophon (from studio recordings made in 1967-1970; the complete Karajan/Berlin Philharmonic Ring is 14 discs, price $1...-$...) The primary criticism of von Karajan's Ring when it was initially released was that his singers are quite uneven, and some of his casting is unconventional and controversial (in particular, his "artificial" casting is problematic, i.e., singers who were chosen for the recording studio but who might not be likely to sing their roles successfully in the opera house). In addition the casting is not consistent from one opera to the next (for example, there are two different Wotans, two different Siegfrieds, two different Brunnhildes; talk about changing horses in midstream!).
On this two-CD selection of highlights we get, obviously, only a very limited exposure to the singers of the complete Ring, but we can see what the criticism was all about. The Rhine maidens are excellent. Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, great artist though he was in his proper sphere, unfortunately kept straying out of it, as he does here: Wotan calls for a Wagnerian Heldenbariton, which Fischer Dieskau certainly was not (any more than he was a Verdi or Puccini baritone). He is out of his depth here. Gerhard Stolze's idea of doing Loge is to talk, rant, and ham it up instead of sing (one wonders if he can sing). Gundula Janowitz is an appealing Sieglinde who sings well; she is lighter-voiced and hence more fragile-sounding than usually heard in the role. Jon Vickers and Thomas Stewart stand out as Siegmund and Wotan (the second one), offering impressive, well-sung performances. (Stewart also sings the Wanderer.) The Valkyries are a weak, underpowered bunch here (compare the lusty, superior Valkyries in the Solti or Bohm sets, for example). Helga Dernesch is a Brunnhilde with a big, healthy voice, good instincts, a comfortable middle, and an effortful top (she later wisely became a mezzo). She is not in the class of Flagstad, Traubel, or Nilsson, but apart from the problematic high notes I admire her Brunnhilde. Jess Thomas is conscientious in the cruelly demanding role of Siegfried, but his voice is basically unattractive and lacks the heft and heroic quality the role demands. (To be fair to him, there hasn't been a truly satisfying Siegfried since the great Lauritz Melchior retired in 1950, and Thomas is representative of the ersatz, makeshift Heldentenorizing we've had to make do with since then.) Helge Brilioth, the second Siegfried, in the little we hear from him here, reveals a more promising voice and sounds more like Siegfried should. The great attraction here is the orchestral playing and polish, which are most impressive, as one would expect from this celebrated team of orchestra and conductor who worked so long together. One has rarely heard the orchestral score so convincingly and painstakingly brought to life, and Karajan is considerate to his hothouse crew of singers, knowing how to scale his orchestra back to let them be heard.
This 2-CD set has direct, head-on competition from a similar (and similarly priced) Philips 2-CD set of highlights from the Ring. The Philips set preserves the Bayreuth "live" performances of the Ring of 1966-67 under Karl Bohm. One of its advantages is generally superior, more involved singing, including the great Birgit Nilsson as Brunnhilde, by singers who sing the same roles throughout (no switching horses in midstream) and who actually sang their roles in the opera house (not just in the recording studio). Also, since the performances are "live," there is a certain sense of vividness, immediacy, and excitement missing in a studio recording. On the other hand, the Karajan set offers generally superior conducting and orchestral playing; his studio recording can be more note-perfect (with its opportunities for re-takes); and the sound of Karajan's set is better than that of Bohm's live performances (although still not as good as Solti's Ring, or the best more recent opera recordings).
So, between the Karajan and Bohm 2-CD Ring highlights sets, there is not a clearcut winner. To make choosing more difficult, both are priced the same and both offer very generously filled CDs (both have about two and a half hours of music). I marginally prefer the Bohm "live" performances, but I couldn't argue with anyone who listened to them both and preferred the Karajan.
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
not an introduction to The Ring April 18 2005
By Kilchomin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This is absolutely the best "highlight" collection out there -- no others come close to the range and depth of material provided. But beware, this is not an "introduction to The Ring", as some claim -- the notes are skimpy, the titles of the excerpts are untranslated, there is no libretto, no description of the excerpts -- their context or meaning -- so what you have is a great summary of the works -- one that is most useful if you already know them -- something to take along with you in the car or while jogging or walking the dog to remind you of the real thing. Bear in mind that whatever the deficiencies of this collection, the others have the same faults also.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
A wonderful introduction, or a new experience Feb. 13 2004
By Augustine - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Admittedly, it is a daunting task to try to "get into" opera, and even more so with Wagner's Ring. This CD is perfect for the beginner and the more experienced listener for various reasons. First of all, it spoils you somewhat in presenting you with the best pieces of the various operas. These "bleeding chunks" certainly give you a wonderful introduction to the various motifs, and most importantly, are very long pieces. The CD manages to capture several of the different flavors present in Wagner's opera.
Secondly, the CD is worth its price mainly due to Karajan's conducting. After listening to Solti's version of the Ring (also wonderful), I was suprised by the subtle hints he seems to charge through. You can literally hear the galloping of the horse, or subtle musical hints which add a great appreciation and character to the opera. Thus, if you have experienced several other conductors, but have not had the pleasure of Karajan, it would be worth the price.
Unfortunatly, some of the singing is kinda weak. Again, after Solti's Valkyries, you will have a hard time getting into the singing. And again, Karajan's Brunhilde isn't as strong as Solti's, but she still holds her own. Loge, here, sounds like a trickster (though he does sing/speak his words), and the Wotan's are alright.
In conclusion, this is perfect if you want to add flavor to your Wagner listening experience, or just want to know what the big deal is. I, of course, suggest getting one of the DVD's to get the big picture of what is going on (Levine's MET is a good start). So buy and enjoy.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A great start for a neophyte like me! May 30 2013
By Thomas Martin - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
DG's late *Panorama* series could be a hit-and-miss affair. The two I especially enjoy are Rimsky-Korsakov Panorama: Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Mussorgsky Panorama: Modest Mussorgsky, but now I have to add two more - this and the highlights set from the non-Ring operas with different conductors and casts Panorama (Highlights from der fliegende Hollander, Lohengrin, Tannhauser, Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg, Parsifal, Tristan und Isolde)

I'm a "Wagner" neophyte who only begrudingly purchased Ormandy's Wagner: Ride of the Valkyries Highlights and Szell's Wagner: Orchestral Music from Der Ring des Nibelungen Die Meistersinger - Tristan und Isolde "bleeding chunks" orchestral selections, and Eileen Farrell's "Wesendonk Songs" Wagner: Selections from Tristan und Isolde, Tannhäuser & Götterdämmerung / Wesendonck-Lieder (Royal Edition No. 100). And unlike several less-than-friendly Ormandy critics, I find his recording having more warm and impact than the revered Szell performances.

I own Solti 4- LP "higlights" from his Ring cycle Wagner Der Ring Des Nibelungen Highlights From the Complete Recording, but as much I value Solti's conducting, and John Culshaw's historic production of the cycle, the London LP transfers seriously under-mined the work of all concerned. Although not as bad as RCA "Dynagroove" fiasco, the LPs still did not elminate but some noticeable break-up and distortion at the top, and the pressings were not flattering to the voices. The set just didn't convince me to pursure Wagner any further - but that opinion is changing quite rapidly after watching Humphrey Burton's 1966 b/w film on the recording of the Solti/Culshaw Ring The Golden Ring - it is a "must see" for anyone with even a passing interest in Wagner, Solti/Culshaw, or the art of recording.

But, doctor, something clicked and now I really want to listen and hear as much as I can - in small does, so I purchased the two Panorama sets and Solti's 2-CD highlight set (that I'm assuming is the same as the dastardly London LP set)Richard Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen -- Great Scenes (Highlights / Excerpts / Scenes on 2 CD's -- 143 minutes) [Sir Georg Solti, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, Birgit Nilsson, Regine Crespin, James King, Wolfgang Windgassen, George London, Hans Hotte...] (it's much less expensive on Amazon's UK site).

My only complaint with these barebones Panorama sets is that neither offer librettos for the selections included; nor even a plot synopsis, so for someone just starting out like myself, it's make for a little tough sleding, but I look forward to getting acquainted with both releases and perhaps finding plot/act summaries on the ever-reliable internet; otherwise, HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Substance! April 15 2001
By CarrieB - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I've recently gotten into opera, and have mostly listened to Italian and French opera (with the exception of Die Zauberflote). I started getting tired of all the frilliness of the Italian works, particulary, and decided to give Serious German Opera a go. As a new opera fan, I was intimidated by Wagner's reputation; lengthy, intense, and heavy. I figured this CD would be a good choice for an introduction, as it features highlights of the entire Ring cycle. I am neither dissapointed, intimidated nor put off by this recording. The depth of the work is a nice change of pace, and very refreshing.


Feedback