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Designing Embedded Hardware Paperback – Nov 30 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (Nov. 30 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596003625
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596003623
  • Product Dimensions: 22.1 x 19.1 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 454 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,279,777 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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Customer Reviews

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By A Customer on May 8 2006
Format: Paperback
I found the book to give a decent introduction to the various issues involved in embedded hardware design. I think that the book would best suite 1st year electrical engineering students since it's theoretical coverage is rather lean, but it does provide a fair amount of "real world" issues that are often missed in textbooks. The author discussed basic computer architectures and assembly programming in the early chapters followed by a couple of chapters on electrical components and power source designs. He gave a fairly good coverage of the various interfaces (SPI, I2C, RS-232, IrDA, and USB) to microcontrollers. It's handy to have this covered in a single text. The last part of the book dealt with several microcontrollers on the market (PIC, AVR, 68HC11, MAXQ, and 68000), along with a chapter on DSPs. I was a little disappointed not to find coverage on the ARM processor architecture(s) since ARM is such a popular core and the fact that there was no coverage of device driver/OS related design issues. So definitely the emphasis is on hardware rather than software embedded design.
So can you learn embedded hardware design from the book? Yes you can to some extent. Expect to use this book to round out the standard textbooks used in electrical and computer engineering (unless you're looking for a refresher) by providing you with a little bit of theory and more "real world" issues. For example, when was the last time a book on electrical engineering discussed soldering issues? (It is covered in this book.) Having said that, the author did not mention anything about very real issues such as RoHS compliance or reflow temperature profiles. The book also only gives a few references, which themselves are buried within the main text (footnotes and/or a bibliography would have been nice). Overall the book is a good read. Consider a stepping stone to becoming an embedded designer.
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By A Customer on April 21 2006
Format: Paperback
I found the book to give a decent introduction to the various issues involved in embedded hardware design. I think that the book would best suite 1st year electrical engineering students since it's theoretical coverage is rather lean, but it does provide a fair amount of "real world" issues that are often missed in textbooks. The author discussed basic computer architectures and assembly programming in the early chapters followed by a couple of chapters on electrical components and power source designs. He gave a fairly good coverage of the various interfaces (SPI, I2C, RS-232, IrDA, and USB) to microcontrollers. It's handy to have this covered in a single text. The last part of the book dealt with several microcontrollers on the market (PIC, AVR, 68HC11, MAXQ, and 68000), along with a chapter on DSPs. I was a little disappointed not to find coverage on the ARM processor architecture(s) since ARM is such a popular core and the fact that there was no coverage of device driver/OS related design issues. So definitely the emphasis is on hardware rather than software embedded design.
So can you learn embedded hardware design from the book? Yes you can to some extent. Expect to use this book to round out the standard textbooks used in electrical and computer engineering (unless you're looking for a refresher) by providing you with a little bit of theory and more "real world" issues. For example, when was the last time a book on electrical engineering discussed soldering issues? (It is covered in this book.) Having said that, the author did not mention anything about very real issues such as RoHS compliance or reflow temperature profiles. The book also only gives a few references, which themselves are buried within the main text (footnotes and/or a bibliography would have been nice). Overall the book is a good read. Consider a stepping stone to becoming an embedded designer.
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By EmbeddedFlyer on April 18 2004
Format: Paperback
Some of the O'Reily books really shine and this is one of them. I'm an experienced hardware engineer, but I still got some good tidbits out of this book which is all the more impressive when you consider it's written for a relative beginner. The author does a nice job with both the content and writing style.
It covers many topics which are relatively common knowledge among experienced hardware designers but you rarely find in one book. Some of those topics I've never seen in ANY book. There's some good stuff here. That said, it's probably not the ideal book for someone who's already tackled a few successful embedded hardware designs.
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Format: Paperback
This book has some good information for the absolute beginner. Most of the information in this book should already be familiar to a person with some experience with Microcontroller development. Data sheets can be found on the Internet for most of the components described in this book. For everything related to the AVR Microcontroller, visit [...] They have a GNU C compiler and some cool tools and links.
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By Andrew on Jan. 27 2004
Format: Paperback
While I don't know if I could build my own embedded device after reading just this book (I don't think I'd be able to this after pretty much any one book), I still felt like this book still delivered on that promise more so than any other single hardware book I've read. So many books gloss over details, either because knowledge is assumed (which is fine in many cases), or because the author doesn't have the detailed knowledge to begin with. And even when the data is in the book, far too often it's exactly that: book data, repackaged information from other sources (often books themselves). It's much better when the knowledge ultimately comes from the author's experiences. Most of the knowledge in this book really seems to be of the latter, and better, variety. I also thought the detailed introductions to a wide range of topics were 'just right' - not too high-level, so they glossed over important details or the underlying fundamentals of how the particular thing worked, but also not so low-level that they assumed knowledge I would have had to go find elsewhere. This goes for a lot of different protocols (RS-232, RS-422, SPI, I2C, USB, and so on) as well as technologies (what's a DSP exactly?).
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