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Designing the Obvious: A Common Sense Approach to Web & Mobile Application Design (2nd Edition) Paperback – Nov 16 2010


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Amazon.com: 5 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Fantastic overvier of usability March 30 2011
By Rob Huddleston - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Towards the end of this book, the author states: "At this point in Web history, we've run out of excuses for bad design." The statement is absolutely true, and yet doesn't explain why so many bad - indeed horrific - designs persist on the web. I can think of only one good explanation: too few designers have read Hoekman's books. There is simply no way you can read this or its companion title, "Designing the Obvious", without questioning almost every decision you've ever made in web design. And that's a good thing, as those questions you'll be asking will inevitably lead to your site's improvement.
Unlike "Designing the Obvious", this book does not spend much time on specifics "how-tos" on improving design. Rather, it presents a set of real-life stories of bad designs and how they were (or could have been) improved using the author's advice. The format, along with Hoekman's eminently readable style, make this a fast, enjoyable read.
My only regret about the book is that it cannot be made required reading for anyone delving into web design. If it was, the web would be a better place; as is, you can at least make your site stand out as one of those people actually *want* to visit by reading this book.
Worth it Feb. 18 2014
By Chase Buckner - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very readable and kept me interested. I have no interest in pursuing the area of HCID but I still found it to be a beneficial read. Can take some concepts presented in the book and apply them to other aspects of life
Fantasticly organized and thoughtful book. Feb. 27 2011
By L. Cledwyn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a thoughtful and engaging review of best practices towards making a high quality web application. I would recommended it for anyone who has any role of developing web apps.
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Only buy if your building a complex application Dec 28 2012
By 93309jd - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I had read Steve Krug's "Don't make me think", and a few other usability books, but wanted to give this one a shot based on the other positive reviews here. All I can say is that I didn't really take away that much, but that's probably because I am not building any kind of complex application, rather a relatively static site with a few dynamic components. If your app is complex and has a lot of user interaction to it and processes, this is a good book for you. Frankly, I didn't really get that much out of it, just the same old "less features, less confusion, mvp type stuff".
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
My New Bible Oct. 12 2011
By Marc S. Ardizzone - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is a must have for anyone who architects or designs websites and/or applications. Buy this book, you will not be disappointed.


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