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Designing with Web Standards (3rd Edition) + Don't Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability (2nd Edition)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: New Riders; 3 edition (Oct. 15 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321616952
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321616951
  • Product Dimensions: 17.8 x 2 x 22.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 794 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #86,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Jeffrey and his web standards coconspirators have made it possible for those old enemies--beauty, usability, and accessibility--to play nice together in any website."  -- Louis Rosenfeld, publisher, Rosenfeld Media

"Zeldman explains complex technologies in a way that designers can not only understand, but actually get excited about.  If you are serious about web design, you need this book.  -- Hillman Curtis, author, MTIV: Process, Inspiration and Practice for the New Media Designer
--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Format: Paperback
Useful book, clear examples, interesting links. I read it from cover to cover. Good reference, basic. I would have liked to have more design examples, but i guess i'll have to browse sites and look at their source code for this.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 18 reviews
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Shows Importance of Web Standards Nov. 23 2009
By katherine Hicks - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
During the prehistoric era of the internet, there was no real guideline for making a website. It was done how one pleased: put a table here and there and viola, you have your layout. But tables were not meant for layout, they were meant for tabular data. Examples such as these are seen in "Designing with Web Standards," and how they can lead to the detriment of the webmaster.

While "Designing with Web Standards" is not necessarily code-intensive, it provides plenty of real-life situations where web standards are important. It is not a guide to creating your website; rather, it is a guide to improve upon it. Jeffrey Zeldman demonstrates that web standards will, in the long run, save you a lot of trouble.

This book is a good read for those who wish to clean their websites and overall make the website less time-consuming and easier to manage.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Required Reading Nov. 25 2009
By Richard Fink - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As used by Jeffrey Zeldman and co-author Ethan Marcotte in the third edition of Designing With Web Standards, the term "web standards" is a catchphrase that refers to writing web pages using, as a basis, a group of free and open technical specifications. The core specs being HTML, CSS, and Java­Script. Think of them as the three legs of a tripod upon which all else rests.
In no way futuristic, this has already happened. HTML, CSS, and Java­Script are at the heart of publishing in the 21st century. DWWS3 is largely about authoring with these and other related specs in smart and efficient ways that could, more simply and accurately, be labeled best practice. The first edition of DWWS in 2003 was in large part a work of advocacy. But six Internet years have passed and today it's main­stream. As I've labeled it on my blog, Readable Web - [...], the third edition is, simply, Required Reading.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Still a classic! March 1 2011
By Gary E. Albers - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There have undoubtably been enough useful reviews of this book already written to enable anyone interested to form an accurate assessment of its contents. Some reviewers have rated it poorly because it was not the comprehensive CSS instruction book they expected. Perhaps they were misled, in part, by some of the five-star reviews that were a bit over-zealous in their praise of it as a book about CSS. With that in mind, I'm hoping another short review will help clear up some of these misunderstandings.

First, the book is NOT a comprehensive treatment of (X)HTML or CSS. It is, however, perhaps the best book around about WHY web standards are important and how they can be utilized to produce semantic markup properly separated from presentational styling, improve code weight, increase accessibility, and deal with cross-browser incompatibilities. Toward this end, Zeldman uses enough good code examples to get his message across. Although it is true that a large portion of the book is dedicated to hard-core preaching about the value of modern standards, the included code is succinct and useful. In particular, his dissection of an actual well-designed website in the last chapter is a gold mine of valuable information.

Zeldman has been at the forefront of the effort to evangelize web standards for many years. He and others (e.g., Cederholm, Marcotte, Moll, Budd, etc.) deserve much of the credit for informing designers about the advantages of standards-based design techniques and getting browser manufacturers to shift from their history of internecine warfare toward endorsing common standards. That has not been an easy task. I suggest that we should all cut Zeldman a little slack if he seems at times to be a bit too passionate. It has always required passion to kick money-lenders out of the temples!

Finally, although this is not a primary text on HTML and CSS (of which there are many), it would undoubtably be of value for any aspiring website designer to have on the shelf next to the main text. I suggest this is especially true considering the recent "victory" of HTML5 over the (X)HTML path. In attempting to respond to the constraints of the real world, HTML5 allows much "sloppy" markup to survive. The need for better discipline in the world of website design will be with us for some time to come. Hopefully Zeldman's book will continue to steer designers in the right direction.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Good but Nov. 30 2009
By Brian Edwards - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Overall good but I question the intended audience of this book. It seems to be directed at people who already know a lot about web design but then goes on to explain the basics. It glosses over a lot of the important issues and seems to ramble on and on about the trivial. The book doesn't really get started until part II. Part 1 could be 1/3 the current size if it didn't repeat itself every few paragraphs. I do like the philosophical/theory type of talk that Zeldman delves into but it just needs to be tightened up. Maybe in the 4th edition?

Anyway, part II is where the book really shines. He explains a lot directly and indirectly by which I mean he selects examples that give you specific code but that also give insight into comprehensive design decisions even when doesn't directly address them. Chapter 17 is a perfect example of this. It makes you really ponder your design decisions.

All criticism aside, I ordered the companion book "Developing with web standards" because I like Zeldman's third edition so much.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Very informative; not a step-by-step tutorial Dec 6 2009
By David Warfel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I would highly recommend this book to anyone in the web design field. A little basic HTML & CSS knowledge would be helpful, but you can do without. I've been designing websites for 4 years, trying to keep up with standards, and there is still much I learned from this book. It has changed the way I code.

He provides very solid arguments why to design with standards; he outlines the benefits; he explains his reasoning to both designers & managers/CEOs. He doesn't tell you there is one way all sites should be designed. Rather, he explains the specifications they should meet, and why you should meet them. He provides several options/techniques on working with browser compatibility.

If you're looking for a tutorial book that blows your mind with crazy-awesome techniques, look elsewhere. But if you're interested in an informative, research/fact-based book, with a personal writing style, that will transform the way you think about the web, help you create accessible, compatible sites for your clients, then you need to read this. And I sincerely hope you are interested.


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