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The Devil Wears Prada (Movie Tie-in Edition) Audio CD – Abridged, Audiobook


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Random House Audio; Abridged edition (May 30 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 073933980X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0739339800
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 15.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 159 g
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (516 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,680,771 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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2.9 out of 5 stars
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By RGos on June 4 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is one of the few books where I had seen the movie before reading the book. Regardless in almost every adaptation I have seen on screen, I generally find the book cannot be matched. Here however the movie actually streamlines the plot in a more structured, and thrilling way. I found the movie was actually carrying the main character through the requisite phases of the story, in the book however, Andy's dislike yet internalizing her Job is a repetitive theme, with the climax being disappointing. R
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2007
Format: Paperback
Lauren Weisberger's "The Devil Wears Prada" just got made into a major motion picture, which always means one thing: Time to check out the book again.

But while "The Devil Wears Prada" is one of the most alluring book titles in years, the actual content behind the title is not nearly as interesting. Alas, it's mostly whiny, poorly written and makes rather feeble grabs for sympathy and understanding, but doesn't actually get either.

As it starts, recent college grad Andrea Sachs wants to be a writer for the New Yorker. But for any chance at that, she has to work as a personal assistant for Miranda Priestly, chief editor of the prestigious fashion magazine Runway. She doesn't like fashion (despite an overriding concern with top-notch brand names) but is willing to do it to move up the ladder of success.

Soon she discovers that Miranda is, in fact, a boss from hell. Lunch demands, business trips, and phone calls are all given a manic twist as Miranda makes demands that no human being should have to put up with. Is it going to get worse? And just how far into Hades can Miranda take Andrea before enough is enough?

Oh, the horrors of being showered with favours and couture clothing. Oh, the pain of money and prestige. Sadly, only wannabe-fashionistas will find this book a compelling read -- at the end, all we're convinced of is that annoying, whiny people will sometimes get what they want... like massive book deals.

Sadly, this isn't even a good beach read -- even beach reads are supposed to have a plot and likable characters. Instead, it's a thinly-veiled roman a clef so the author can portray her ex-boss Anna Wintour as evil incarnate (get it? "Devil Wears Prada" -- how deviously subtle!).
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Format: Paperback
I read this book hoping for a light, funny, chick-lit read and wasn't disappointed. I didn't read it hoping to get the inside scoop on anything or to learn about the who's who of fashion. I wanted fun, some silliness, and a heroine I could relate to who wasn't completely out of touch with the real world. Usually, the female protagonists in chick-lit novels are so vacuous, so idiotic, so self-absorbed, so incapable of existing in the real world, and placed in such ridiculous romantic situations that I want to hurl the book across the room. This was more fun and much more clever than all the rest put together.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. Miller on May 8 2003
Format: Hardcover
OK, we get it. Andrea Sachs has the worst boss ever. That's about all you need to know about Lauren Weisberger's novel "The Devil Wears Prada."
True, the title is great, and so the subject matter could have been. Instead, though, the book is a seemingly endless litany of all of the insane things fashion editor Miranda Priestly does or demands her peon assistant to do or get for her, and the gag grows old. Undoubtedly, Priestly is pathetic, unable (or just unwilling) to do even the simplest task for herself, while demanding others do the impossible. (It's a thinly veiled secret that Priestly is based on Anna Wintour, the famously icy editor of Vogue, and the fictional Elias-Clark Company is of course Conde Nast.) Weisberger has some fun mocking the Manolo-clad fashion assistants she calls "Clackers," as well as the fabulous, excessive Conde Nast cafeteria. And Miranda's craziness is a scream, but that's where the fun ends.
The problem lies with the protagonist herself. She doesn't have to be likeable, but she could at least be interesting. Instead, Andrea Sachs is a whiny, spoiled brat who thinks the world should just fall at her feet. She makes no attempt to hide the fact that she thinks working at a fashion magazine is completely insignificant and beneath her. We may be able to identify with having a hellish job, but the thing is, that doesn't make us sympathize with her. Everyone, unless they come from extreme privilege or just have damn good luck, has had a horrendous first job or a terrible boss, so we don't exactly feel sorry for her when she must deal with Miranda's antics. In fact, Andrea has such a sense of entitlement, such a ridiculous superiority complex, that we almost smile when she must search block after block for an antique store Miranda remembers seeing once.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Melye on July 22 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This was not a horrible book but it did lack some substance or whatever that thing is that makes a book memorable. It was entertaining. I would put it on the same level as say, Ellen Degenere's "MY POINT IS", which was super funny in a very light and easy kind of way (I recommend that book too, by the way). But if you are looking for a plot that will draw you in you may not enjoy this book so much. It is a light reader--expect nothing more and you will be fine. Janet Evanovich's novels (any one of them) are equally funny but with engaging plots to go with the witty writing. One of my favorite books lately is Nancy Madore's "ENCHANTED" which is a very entertaining rewrite of the classic fairy tales.
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