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The Diary of a Young Girl Mass Market Paperback – Jun 1 1993


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; Reprint edition (June 1 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780553296983
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553296983
  • ASIN: 0553296981
  • Product Dimensions: 10.7 x 2 x 17.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 9 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (445 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,616 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

A beloved classic since its initial publication in 1947, this vivid, insightful journal is a fitting memorial to the gifted Jewish teenager who died at Bergen-Belsen, Germany, in 1945. Born in 1929, Anne Frank received a blank diary on her 13th birthday, just weeks before she and her family went into hiding in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. Her marvelously detailed, engagingly personal entries chronicle 25 trying months of claustrophobic, quarrelsome intimacy with her parents, sister, a second family, and a middle-aged dentist who has little tolerance for Anne's vivacity. The diary's universal appeal stems from its riveting blend of the grubby particulars of life during wartime (scant, bad food; shabby, outgrown clothes that can't be replaced; constant fear of discovery) and candid discussion of emotions familiar to every adolescent (everyone criticizes me, no one sees my real nature, when will I be loved?). Yet Frank was no ordinary teen: the later entries reveal a sense of compassion and a spiritual depth remarkable in a girl barely 15. Her death epitomizes the madness of the Holocaust, but for the millions who meet Anne through her diary, it is also a very individual loss. --Wendy Smith

From Publishers Weekly

This startling new edition of Dutch Jewish teenager Anne Frank's classic diary?written in an Amsterdam warehouse, where for two years she hid from the Nazis with her family and friends?contains approximately 30% more material than the original 1947 edition. It completely revises our understanding of one of the most moving and eloquent documents of the Holocaust. The Anne we meet here is much more sarcastic, rebellious and vulnerable than the sensitive diarist beloved by millions. She rages at her mother, Edith, smolders with jealous resentment toward her sister, Margot, and unleashes acid comments at her roommates. Expanded entries provide a fuller picture of the tensions and quarrels among the eight people in hiding. Anne, who died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in March 1945, three months before her 16th birthday, candidly discusses her awakening sexuality in entries that were omitted from the 1947 edition by her father, Otto, the only one of the eight to survive the death camps. He died in 1980. This crisp, stunning translation provides an unvarnished picture of life in the "secret annex." In the end, Anne's teen angst pales beside her profound insights, her self-discovery and her unbroken faith in good triumphing over evil. Photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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First Sentence
I hope I will be able to confide everything to you, as I have never been able to confide in anyone, and I hope you will be a great source of comfort and support. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Rich Stoehr on March 19 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Before I read Anne Frank's famous diary of her experiences in 1942-1944 as a Jewish teenager hiding in Amsterdam, I wondered if it was so well-known because it was well-written, or because it served as a compelling historical document of a difficult time and place. After reading it I can say that, for me at least, it is both.
Anne's story has so many elements. It is largely the story of herself, a developing, maturing teenager, and the people she interacts with on a daily basis. But as the Nazis take over and she is forced to go into hiding with her family, there is a sharp feeling of change. It is still her story, a very personal story. And yet, permeating her story at every point is this sense of something very dangerous all around, constantly threatening to encroach. We already know most or all of what the Nazis did as they occupied much of Europe, but Anne's diary is a historical document in the sense that it provides a unique, deeply personal perspective on how that time effected a very few people. Some people wil say that history is mainly told in the big events, but I disagree. History means little if we can't see how it effects even the most unlikely, otherwise unknown people. In reading Anne's diary, I could see history's effect on the individual more clearly than ever before.
And yet her writing itself is quite good as well. It's fairly good when the diary begins, with her at age 13. It is even better when it ends, shortly after she turns 15. She had a talent for description and an eye for detail that is rare in any writer, and she was very honest in her feelings, opinions, and experiences. We get her impressions of the Germans and the occupation, of course, but we also get the stories of her squabbles with her family and with the other members of the "Secret Annex.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By hannah on Dec 15 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I recently read The Diary of Anne Frank: The Definitive Edition by Anne Frank. I told my parents that I was reading it and they told me it was a good book, but I never thought I would like it as much as I did. I liked this book so much because you got to know Anne, her family and the guests that were staying with them in the place they called the Secret Annex. Anne let you know exactly what was happening which made me feel like I had actually been there right by her side. What also made the writing of the book excellent in my opinion was that Anne was a very outgoing girl. She made the passages in her diary sound more exciting to make the reader want to read more. You also got to know Anne more mentally than any other person in the book. She shares her inner most thoughts and feelings with her diary, Kitty. I also thought it was very interesting to find out that all the members in the annex hid from the Nazis for a little over 2 months. This book has definitely changed my outlook on the Holocaust and life. I recommend it to anyone!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Dec 1 2002
Format: Hardcover
I'm 47 years old and have had the pleasure of reading many great works of literature over the years that deeply affected me. Yet of everything I have ever read, nothing has ever moved me as much as The Diary of a Young Girl. I can state this with certainty because I have just read it for the first time. Oh, I might have read it in school 30 or 35 years ago, but if I did I have no real recollection of it other than the famous quotes that have become part of Western culture. But after visiting the Ann Frank House in Amsterdam recently, I felt I ought to read it.

I was not prepared for the impact. Although I was certainly expecting to be touched by its poignancy as the legacy of a young concentration camp victim, and knew that it contained memorable passages, I had no idea it would be so overflowing with beauty and truth. I had no idea that there would be so many humorous episodes and that so many entries would sparkle with wit and wisdom, and I had no idea that it was written with such freshness and vitality that the words practically leap off the page. But it has all this, and so much more.

Although I'm not an emotional guy, by the time I reached the entries of 1944 (which contain some of the most moving passages) I was crying myself to sleep every night. That has never happened to me before, and it probably never will again, because there will never be another Anne Frank. This book is one of the wonders of the world.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amanda on May 31 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This complete edition of Anne's diary makes us realize how hard it was for Anne to live in her "Secret Annex", hiding from the Nazis. During the WWII, it wasn't easy for Jews to survive, so Anne, her family, and a couple of friends, decided to hide in a building, which they renamed the "Secret Annex". While the other editions omitted Anne's more private thoughts, this edition is more complete and Anne's private thoughts about sexuality are also included. Her fear about being caught by Nazis is overwhelming, however she soon ignores these fears and must face constant famine and the challenges of becoming a woman. Often disagreeing with her mother, she runs to Peter, a boy of her age, for advice. It is then that she slowly discovers she is having mixed feelings about this boy whom she rarely paid any attention to. She starts discovering what love is, but how can she continue her relationship with Peter when she hears Nazi airplanes throwing bombs in the city every night?
Anne was a very strong person and, day after day, was glad she was alive, even though things didn't always go her way. After a while, she got used to her routine and never thought the Germans would one day discover her secret hiding place. However, as the Nazis got stronger, they one day discovered the Frank's secret hiding place, and Otto, Anne's father, was the only one out of the eight people in the annex who survived the concentration camps. When he returned to the Secret Annex after his liberation, he found Anne's diary and passed on her message to the world. This book is a good way towards a better understanding of what Jews had to live through during the second World War.
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