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Diary of the Dead [Blu-ray]


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Frequently Bought Together

Diary of the Dead [Blu-ray] + George A Romero's Survival of The Dead  / La survie des morts-vivants  (Bilingual) [Blu-ray] + Land of the Dead [Blu-ray]
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Product Details

  • Format: Widescreen
  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: R
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001CDLARQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #66,475 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

DIARY OF THE DEAD - Blu-Ray Movie

Customer Reviews

2.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By CC Vandale on May 26 2014
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is shown from young college student aspect and how to survive through the zombie epidemic. You find yourself rooting for these students. Can they survive? Watch it and find out. The watch it again for sheer enjoyment. Hold onto your seats as these students take you for a ride of horror, comedy, love and laughter. It is a must see
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Matthew King on June 1 2008
Format: DVD
"Diary of the Dead" is the fifth installment in George Romero's zombie cannon which started off with 1968's genre-defining "Night of the Living Dead", was updated brilliantly and surpassed by the 1978 sequel "Dawn of the Dead", which was also nearly (but not quite) upstaged by 1985's excellent "Day of the Dead". This trilogy proved that when it came to zombies, George could do no wrong. In 2005 Romero returned with the 20 years in the waiting "Land of the Dead" a film, which was met with very mixed fan reaction. I personally liked Land of the Dead and dug it for what it was. We couldn't expect George to make movies look as though it was still 1985 could we?

Story: In Diary, a group of college students from Pitt University flee from campus after a zombie outbreak. They hit the road in a big hippy-style van so they can go back home and be with their (hopefully still alive?) loved ones. One of the students named Jason decides to film all of the events and broadcast on-line for the world to see. The film thus plays out as a sort of web-cam unfolding of events.

My initial reaction on hearing about the premise of Romero's new zombie opus was not necessarily a negative one. Sure, the shaky-camera, reality thing has been played out for years now but I gave Romero the benefit of the doubt because it wouldn't be the first time he reinvents himself through these films. Although all of them are zombie films, "Night" is radically different from "Dawn" which is radically different from "Land". So in Diary, Romero is not settling but continuing to reinvent himself. But oh, how poorly this is executed! Nearly everything in this film is an absolute mess. The CGI head shots that make us crave for Tom Savini.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jenny J.J.I. TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 29 2008
Format: DVD
I thought the film was okay but I know to myself it will never be my favorite out of the bunch. Though it was a documentary I didn't quite catch it as one or for the majority of the film. In here we have a film crew that made up of different characters: The director Jason (Joshua Close) who acts though he believes that if it didn't happen on camera, then it never happened at all. There's his girlfriend Debra (Michelle Morgan) who gets increasingly annoyed with his filming everybody, Tony (Shawn Roberts) who looks like he is prepared to beat Jason to death, and there's even the drunken film professor Maxwell (Scott Wentworth) who looks upon everything with a bemused attachment. What George Romero succeeds in doing as a writer is give us characters who aren't simple types and break those clichés to become increasingly unpredictable in their actions.

Which is one of Romero's strong attributes is that he gives us strong characters with females and minorities. He started doing this a long time ago with "Night Of The Living Dead," and it continues on with this one. The female character that comes across as the strongest here is Debra, played by Michelle Morgan. She is driven to get back to her family who are back at home, and she is not about to get sucked into watching things through a camera lens. Michelle gives the strongest performance in the movie, and she also narrates the movie within the movie, so you have a pretty good idea of what happens to her character. The group does run into a squad of African Americans who have taken over a small town and all its supplies, and who refuse to leave the town.
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0 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jey Bugden on Aug. 5 2008
Format: DVD
this movie,was aweful shot like the blair witch project,except with zombies,ppl running around with stedicams.so if u liked witch,u are welcome to this garabage movie.and ilike george remero movies,this movie i didnt!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 231 reviews
34 of 43 people found the following review helpful
I can't hate the man at least he tried May 29 2008
By Jenny J.J.I. - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I thought the film was okay but I know to myself it will never be my favorite out of the bunch. Though it was a documentary I didn't quite catch it as one or for the majority of the film. In here we have a film crew that made up of different characters: The director Jason (Joshua Close) who acts though he believes that if it didn't happen on camera, then it never happened at all. There's his girlfriend Debra (Michelle Morgan) who gets increasingly annoyed with his filming everybody, Tony (Shawn Roberts) who looks like he is prepared to beat Jason to death, and there's even the drunken film professor Maxwell (Scott Wentworth) who looks upon everything with a bemused attachment. What George Romero succeeds in doing as a writer is give us characters who aren't simple types and break those clichés to become increasingly unpredictable in their actions.

Which is one of Romero's strong attributes is that he gives us strong characters with females and minorities. He started doing this a long time ago with "Night Of The Living Dead," and it continues on with this one. The female character that comes across as the strongest here is Debra, played by Michelle Morgan. She is driven to get back to her family who are back at home, and she is not about to get sucked into watching things through a camera lens. Michelle gives the strongest performance in the movie, and she also narrates the movie within the movie, so you have a pretty good idea of what happens to her character. The group does run into a squad of African Americans who have taken over a small town and all its supplies, and who refuse to leave the town. This is because for once, they have power over something that they have never had before, and you could see it as a sort of revenge against the white man for all they have put their people through.

The movie does have its share of good scares, and has that same morbid humor that has been present in all of Romero's "Dead" movies. This does make this film relevant in a way even after four decades after the very first one. The last scene in the movie questions the audience directly as to if we as a race are really worth saving or not. That scene will stay with you long after the movie has ended because the characters have only started to learn how to exist in a post-zombie world (shades of 9/11 do abound here and there).

The suspense was there along with the blood and gore, it was giving to us in a fair dose though not quite on the same level as "Dawn" or "Day." Still, there are some good kills throughout, and the characters make good use of a scythe and a bow and arrow. Romero, after all these years, doesn't skimp on the good stuff. However, it still takes these characters way too long to figure out that the best way to defeat a zombie is to shoot it in the head. Aside from that I was slightly disappointed with this film or documentary. I'm thinking there may be room for another one Romero zombie yet, and there is hope to be had in that even if the world is still falling apart. I wouldn't mind seeing him do one more, but I hope it comes out before the apocalypse hits us.
17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
The horror of modern technology May 27 2008
By C. Christopher Blackshere - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Good evening. This is Tom with Channel 4 news. The stock market crashed as oil prices hit record highs. The unemployment rate ballooned nearly 10% the past month while crime keeps escalating at an alarming rate. Home equity plummetted, health care plans are becoming invalid, taxes rose, debt skyrocketed, and the soldier's death toll suffers its most jagged increase since the opening weeks of the war. But to heck with all that irrelevant junk, did you watch American Idol last night? Hahaha, that's some funny stuff!

My biggest problem with the latest Dead installment is the seesaw effect between the serious and the comical. Throw in so much cheese and corn, and it's hard to digest all of the social and political commentary. George makes some great points, some important profound statements, and then shows something totally absurd to spoil the moment. I didn't particularly care for that.
I've got some more issues with this one. The acting is pretty bad, but that didn't really bother me. Neither did the CGI. I hated the tone, or the mood of this entire story. George never really establishes a dark, gloomy, foreboding atmosphere. In my opinion, an adequate feel of desperation never settles in, I'm sorry to say.
I did love the idea of the homemade zombie documentary. Romero tries to bring a fresh element to the horror genre, and for that he should be commended. But the camera work was not too convincing. It rarely has a real feel. And I was shocked at how underdeveloped the characters are. Maybe this story is about people as a whole, but some closer connection with some individuals would have been nice.

Diary of the Dead starts strong, but quickly fizzles out in many aspects. There are some nice gore scenes, although it seemed to be lacking in that department a bit. It has some undeniably great pieces from the master, but are bogged down by chunks of disaster. I will say that I'm impressed with Romero's efforts at something original in the zombie saga. Hopefully his latest effort will grow on me.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
DIARY a surprisingly fresh, thoughtful and strange entry Feb. 26 2010
By Brian Ridgway - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Hello, and THANK YOU for reading my reviews. Despite my deep respect for George Romero as a filmmaker, I've waited until this week (over 2 years after it's release!) to see DIARY OF THE DEAD. Mainly it's because I was somewhat disappointed with his last big horror feature LAND OF THE DEAD, but following my recent screening, I have to say that I found DIARY to be an unusual, entertaining feature. Filled with interesting content, reasonably solid dialogue and good characterizations, DIARY is an unusual choice for Romero in that it 'compresses' the zombie world he's created, in effect moving the events of the original NIGHT to relatively current times, as well as placing the followup DAWN OF THE DEAD in a time frame as to suggest that it occurred only weeks ago. Strange as that sounds, Romero makes it work by filling the screen with haunting images of violence, an unsettling tone of despair and a modern pace that compares (and transcends) most contemporary thrillers. Although the film starts out a bit 'stilted', it's relatively easy to fall into line with the pack of survivors he creates here. The actors are all unknown but deliver solid performances. If I had one major complaint with the film though, it's that Romero's decision to shoot on HD video (not only as a budget constraint, but as clearly as part of the in-film story) it's that there are a few TOO MANY scenes where the screen is too dark, losing character detail and confusing the action. HD video seems to be good for relaying vibrant color, but the blacks seem all too FLAT and the lens range doesn't seem to compensate well when going from indoor to outdoor environments. Having said that, I found the film overall probably the most effective ROMERO ZOMBIE entry in terms of maintaining an effectively creepy tone throughout, as well as a terrifically bizarre ending shot that's as shocking and oddly thoughtful as anything he's committed to film. All in all, after TWO viewings, I feel that DIARY has achieved a position directly behind DAWN OF THE DEAD and NIGHT as my THIRD FAVORITE zombie effort.I wasn't crazy about Romero doing another zombie film, but with DIARY, he's shown considerable growth and energy as a filmmaker and cultural commentator.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Blair Witch meets Night of the Living Dead March 9 2008
By J. Davis - Published on Amazon.com
Diary of the Dead finally released in my hometown. Overall, it was a decent flick but I couldn't help but feel somemthing was lacking. Romero decided to film the movie with a Blair Witch/documentary type of feel and this (I felt) kind of shorted the viewer. Instead of being able to lose yourself in the story, your constantly reminded you are in fact watching a movie.

Downsides-
The movie is constantly interrupted by narrative voice-overs.
Because the group decides to bypass major populated areas, you never get to really see whats going on in the real world except for tiny news clips which you have to watch as the "camera" films the group watching on a tiny monitor.
As soon as the group gets a chance to access weapons not one more gunshot is fired throughout the film (LAME).
The "camera guy's" friends would not shut-up about him filming. Get over it already or break his camera.

Upsides-
Samuel the Amish guy totally rocked! (Diary is worth seeing just for this charecter alone).
Zombie Goldfish
A few (and sad to say I do mean few) nice zombie deaths.

I'd have to say Dawn of the Dead is still remains my favorite and in order to be completely fair, as of now, I would have to rank "Diary" as my least favorite. I really wanted to be blown away but I have to admit I wasn't.

Diary of the Dead is still worth seeing especially if your a zombie or Romero fan. Just don't have your hopes up to see anything new and innovative to be added to this genre. Keep your eye out for a George Romero cameo! I give it 3.5 stars (*sigh*).
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
When there is no more room in hell... July 22 2008
By jbot - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
...the dead shall inundate Hollywood!

First let me just say, I'm a big Romero fan, after all he's the father, err grandfather, of zombie filmmaking. Last year when I first heard that Romero was making another dead film and I started seeing trailers for Diary of the Dead; I was overwhelmed with excitement. It seemed edgy, gritty, and kind of reminded me of Martin in that it was set out to be more of an experiment in filmmaking and carried itself in a kind of intellectual way.

Fast forward to a few months ago and Dimension Extreme released Diary of the Dead on DVD. First, what is it about the word "extreme" that immediately makes me doubt the intention of its very meaning? Oh I know, Tartan Asia Extreme has sullied the expression on more than one occasion; but that's beside the point. I keep an open mind because both Tartan and Dimension have put out some excellent stuff; it's just every now and then...well you know. Anyway, I'll get right to it. Diary of the Dead missed its mark for me; conceptually Romero gets an A+, as always, but he just failed to deliver in his execution.

Romero makes some of the most prolific, poignant social observations of any filmmaker I know. Subtly masked within their zombie layer his commentary has a way of creeping in and infiltrating barriers that we would normally, perhaps inadvertently, be not in tune with. In this case, sensationalized media, desensitized and habitualized society, was, and I think the biggest, comment made in Diary. "The people need to know" words that echoed repeatedly in my mind while watching this film. It could be construed as irony within a world where the term "people" and what qualifies is quickly becoming debatable. It reminds me of the adage; if a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear, does it make a sound? I think the real question Romero asks is does it really matter if it makes a sound? Touché, Romero, touché.

Well with Romero's good intentions aside; the film just didn't pull it off for me. I'm not sure if it was because of a low budget or what but Diary just came off as trite. The innovative third person documentary style came off as overly polished and the camera work lacked the gritty documentary feel. Maybe the HDV video look was not the best way to differentiate between the uses of multiple cameras. It simply blurred them and made it appear that the filmographer was drunk. Simply put it lacked the realism that one would expect from a documentary. However, the biggest flaw was not that Romero didn't keep up with the thread of different cameras; in fact that all pretty much made sense as we would go from one camera as its battery died to another that "coincidentally"(accidentally on purpose) was placed in another strategic location. It's just that it made no sense as to how we, the audience, happened across the masterful, edited copy of the video in question. It didn't jive with me, in fact bugged me throughout the whole film.

There is not much else left to say about the film at this point. The gamble Romero took by using this documentary style as a plot device just didn't hit therefore things like the acting is irrelevant. The effects certainly didn't make up for anything either. The CGI gore just, well sucked. Sorry I couldn't be more constructive there but it just wasn't believable and looked as though it was edited along with the fake made for TV movie that the protagonist shot.

It was certainly a great effort on Romero's part and any fan of Romero can appreciate what he is doing and has done for the horror genre. I think he is definitely, continually going in the right direction with his films. I just think he needs to let go and really get back to his roots a bit more and experiment.

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