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Dig Lazarus Dig!!!


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Dig Lazarus Dig!!! + Abattoir Blues / The Lyre of Orpheus (Vinyl)
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 8 2008)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Anti
  • ASIN: B0014DBZT2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #25,805 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!
2. Today's Lesson
3. Moonland
4. Night of the Lotus Eaters
5. Albert Goes West
6. We Call Upon the Author
7. Hold On To Yourself
8. Lie Down Here (& Be My Girl)
9. Jesus of the Moon
10. Midnight Man
11. More News From Nowhere

Product Description

Nick Cave returns to his full time Bad Seeds co-conspirators for this release. "Grinderman was deliberately spare and the concepts were pretty simple," explains Cave. "With 'Dig, Lazarus, Dig!!!' we allowed ourselves to get expansive." It picks up where Grinderman left off, filled with Stoogified electric guitar, driving beats, and Cave's literate, seductive, and firmly tongue-in-cheek lyrics.

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By power on May 4 2008
Format: Audio CD
The prolific Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds have been refining and revitalising their music for decades but have not reached the end of their inventiveness yet. Severely cutting back on the trademark wailing violin and spooky piano - and with a noticeable dearth of songs about dead girls - "Dig, Lazarus Dig!!!" is rockier and funnier than the "Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orheus" offering.
That 2004 dazzling double opus would have left lesser bands gasping for creative oxygen, but their thirteenth studio LP rather suggested a band with limitless artistic energy and endurance.
There's a sense of fun here - not always a mainstay of the previous 13 Bad Seeds albums - but we're back to Cave the poet, Cave the laconic chronicler, and he's being a bit more flowery about the rude stuff.
With much of the energy of the grungier "Grinderman" project, Cave et al explored last year, "Dig" is stuffed with all the literary, biblical and mythological jumble fans can usually expect.
If there is a trademark Bad Seed sound, it is most apparent in "Jesus of the Moon", in which Cave's talent for emotive narrative is accompanied by elegant flute.
As verbose and intellectual as it is scary and unsettling, "Dig" is a baffling, dark masterpiece in which Cave deliberately sets out not to deliver the sweet tones of the piano or the guitar chords which massage the pleasure centres of the psyche.
Instead we get rock constantly verging on dissonance, with squalls of sound and numbing basslines.
There are few musicians, who have never had a major record deal, yet command an ever-growing audience and, at 50, are unleashing music with all the vigour and imagination of their youth.
Nick Cave turned out astonishingly primal garage-rock with last year's Grinderman album.
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By Laurie Anderson on Dec 26 2014
Format: LP Record Verified Purchase
Love it however i thought it would be in box format
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 54 reviews
63 of 70 people found the following review helpful
"The older he gets, the more revitalised he sounds." April 8 2008
By monte - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The prolific Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds have been refining and revitalising their music for decades but have not reached the end of their inventiveness yet. Severely cutting back on the trademark wailing violin and spooky piano - and with a noticeable dearth of songs about dead girls - "Dig, Lazarus Dig!!!" is rockier and funnier than the "Abattoir Blues/The Lyre of Orheus" offering Abattoir Blues / Lyre of Orpheus.
That 2004 dazzling double opus would have left lesser bands gasping for creative oxygen, but their thirteenth studio LP rather suggested a band with limitless artistic energy and endurance.
There's a sense of fun here - not always a mainstay of the previous 13 Bad Seeds albums - but we're back to Cave the poet, Cave the laconic chronicler, and he's being a bit more flowery about the rude stuff.
With much of the energy of the grungier "Grinderman" project Grinderman Cave et al explored last year, "Dig" is stuffed with all the literary, biblical and mythological jumble fans can usually expect.
If there is a trademark Bad Seed sound, it is most apparent in "Jesus of the Moon", in which Cave's talent for emotive narrative is accompanied by elegant flute.
As verbose and intellectual as it is scary and unsettling, "Dig" is a baffling, dark masterpiece in which Cave deliberately sets out not to deliver the sweet tones of the piano or the guitar chords which massage the pleasure centres of the psyche.
Instead we get rock constantly verging on dissonance, with squalls of sound and numbing basslines.
There are few musicians, who have never had a major record deal, yet command an ever-growing audience and, at 50, are unleashing music with all the vigour and imagination of their youth.
Nick Cave turned out astonishingly primal garage-rock with last year's Grinderman album.
Here, back with the Bad Seeds, he veers wildly between grooviness, beauty and ear-splitting white noise.
The narratives he delivers are fantastically weird: on the title track, the biblical Lazarus returns from the dead in sleazy, pre-Giuliani New York.
The song brilliantly repositions the myth of Lazarus in the moral swamp of 1970s N.Y.; with the Bad Seeds coming on like the Stooges after a funk injection, while "Moonland" is a Taxi Driver narrative with a man behind the wheel in lonely rage. "Albert Goes West" is a report of a psychotic episode which manages to rhyme 'vulva' with 'sucking a revolver'.
"We Call Upon the Author" is Cave addressing God, and chiding those who ask him to explain his songs. "I go guruing down the street", he wails, "Young people gather round my feet/Ask me things - but I don't know where to start".
Even when the maudlin "Hold On To Yourself" provides something musically straightforward - a theme which would not go amiss on the soundtrack to a spaghetti western - there is a din going on in the background which sounds like a colony of agitated bats.
Then listen to "Night Of The Lotus Eaters" and you have a clatttery blues riff around which there are guitar sounds which spookily resemble a creaking door. And then there is "Lie Down Here", whose intro sounds like a man involved in a fight to the death with feedback. This is one mean, ornery album. But it is not in the mould of the primeval Grinderman project.
It's much cleverer than that. "Dig" is, by Cave's own testimony, more expansive, teasing us with glimpses of psychedelia. You could draw comparisons as diverse as Tom Waits and The Fall, but "Dig" is simply great on its own terms.
It is a confident album by musicians who are not simply singing the songs they know will sell and it is an interesting, exciting and often irreverent offering. Adult, funny, packed with Freudian allusion and apocalyptic dread, it really is magnificent stuff.
Download : "We Call Upon the Author", "Midnight Man" and "Jesus On The Moon".
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
WE CALL UPON THE AUTHOR March 9 2008
By K. H. Orton - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I think the gist of this one can pretty much be summed up with the line, " we've been scribbled in the margins of a story that is patently absurd" ( Lie Down Here & Be My Girl).

Cave & the Bad Seeds' 14th pretty much picks up where Grinderman left off. But where that album's Garage/ Blues lampoon was more of a lark, the stakes have been raised on Dig. Mad carny swirls of organ replace the tickling ivories of yore. Lashing Fenders duke it out with sleazy bass lines. There's even a lute (courtesy of the criminally gifted Warren Ellis). Throughout Cave holds court with self-mocking swagger. In short, this is a Bad Seeds record unlike anything that ever came before.

I will say that fans of Cave's Boatman's Call balladry are likely to be disappointed. The only things that would remotely qualify as ballads are hauntingly atmospheric numbers like "Hold Onto Yourself" & "Jesus Of The Moon. Lyrically, Cave empties out the asylum here. The songs are sprawling, surreal narratives that hark back to the Dylan Subterranean Homesick/ Desolation Row tradition. Some might say the man needs an editor, but they'd just be missing the point. In terms of the writing, he's hit on a perfect mix of the literary & the profane.

I've always maintained that fans & critics often take Cave far more seriously than he does. Never has this been more apparent than on Dig. This is a playful, groove laden & hilariously over the top record. Cave's sense of satire & contempt has never been so off the cuff.

The title cut is in the Lyre of Orpheus tradition, once more yanking the carpet out from under an established mythological figure. In this case, the victim is poor Lazarus, resurrected from the dead only to be so mortified, he yearns to dig himself back into the grave. His spade of choice---debauchery. One listen & you'll be chanting, "Lazrus dig yourself" for days. Suffice it to say, Cave wields the double entendre like a switchblade.

"Today's Lesson" seems to be nothing more than, "congregating around the intersection of Janie's jeans". Guess it all could be summed up by the song's refrain, clearly echoing the Stooges classic "Real Cool Time". By far the eeriest track is "Night Of The Lotus Eaters" seconded by the ominous travelogue, "Albert Goes West". Classic Cave. Word play reaches a fore with "We Call Upon The Author" which manages to merge the meaningful with the absurd. For my money, "Midnight Man" is one more on the list of standouts. The shamelessly catchy "More News From Nowhere" closes the door on a suitably warped note.

In this age of downloading I say this one makes a strong case for the validity of the album format. These guys are taking you on a journey here & dear reader---- its one hell of ride.
21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
The album Grinderman should have been May 12 2008
By C. Boerger - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Before the release of Grinderman, I remember getting all excited reading that Nick Cave was coming out with hard rocking album. Unfortunately, the CD didn't live up to my expectations, it struck me as more of a throwaway than a committed project. But at least I didn't have long to wait for the real goods. Dig Lazarus Dig is everything I had been hoping for in a rocking Nick Cave release, full-fledged songs, fun yet biting lyrics, a diversity of musical styles, moments of pensiveness and beauty, and oh yeah, it really really jams. Welcome back, Nick!

I don't understand why some reviewers are knocking this album. This, to me, is not the sound of Nick Cave in a rut, this is the sound of Nick and the Bad Seeds revitalized. We all love Nick Cave the twisted balladeer, the lounge singer with the dark tortured soul of an Ingmar Bergman, the pensive Nick Cave of The Good Son, Murder Ballads, The Boatman's Call, No More Shall We Part and The Lyre of Orpheus/Abbatoir Blues, but staying in that same mode ad infinitum would have constituted the true rut. It was time for a change, and Lazarus indicates a deviation in focus I ardently applaud, even if it turns out to be for one album only. Nick's characteristic snarl is still here, but he seems to be having more fun this time around. Does that make some of the lyrics less deep than what we're accustomed to? Maybe, but that doesn't mean they're not every bit as intelligent and literate and black as before. Nick has opted for a more absurdist lyrical style on several of the songs, going off on bizarre tangents while spinning his characteristically sardonic narratives, and frankly I'm not always sure what the hell he's singing about, but the results are damned entertaining nonetheless. As for the musical element, I like the sound of Nick Cave cutting loose. This might be the closest thing to a party album that Nick and the Bad Seeds ever release, and it is appropriately raunchy, but that doesn't make it negligible. The title song which opens the album, and We Call Upon the Author, positioned directly at the middle, and the closing More News From Nowhere are the key tracks here, setting the mood of theater of the absurd spontaneity, but they aren't necessarily the strongest. This is a hook-laden album, with Nick's pop sensibilities in full swing. In addition to those three songs, I really love Today's Lesson, Hold On To Yourself, Lie Down Here(& Be My Girl) and Midnight Man. Besides its melodic invention and lyrical, flamboyance, Lazarus has the added advantage of being far from a one note adventure; musical ideas abound. Night of the Lotus Eaters employs what sounds like a steel drum, Hold On To Yourself and Jesus Of the Moon are beautiful ballads in the tradition of his more recent albums, but with some musical twists(Hold On has a distinctly western twang), and Lie Down Here is a barroom sizzler, the kind of all out assault Nick and the boys haven't done for a while(not counting Grinderman), with an irresistible melody and a propulsive performance by the band. Lazarus might be Nick's most American album, with its nods to American music and its darkly comic examinations of American celebrity and culture.

Some may argue with Nick's change in direction, I find it exhilarating. To the naysayers, criticize this album if you must, but please don't accuse Nick Cave of getting stale. For me this album is a refreshing change of pace, with the emphasis on fresh.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
great new album June 18 2008
By Joseph Broze - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Perhaps re-energized by the Grinderman project, this album finds Nick Cave and company picking up the pace a bit from the last few Bad Seeds albums.

I disagree with the (semi) negative reviews. I appreciate the fact that he mixed things up a bit and think the song-writing and lyrics are still top notch.

Can't wait for the tour!
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
It's a new Nick Cave &TBS album... so how can I complain?? March 20 2008
By N. Flowers - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I LOVE Nick Cave.

Like the previous reviewer pointed out, this sounds more like a better, more polished sequel to Cave's GRINDERMAN album... so if you're looking for a AND NO MORE SHALL WE PART or BOATMAN'S CALL - type album, you're out of luck. But don't dismiss this album, though... it's got some great cuts that are destined to become more Cave classics.

For the past decade, I've had to order Cave's albums from overseas, since America doesn't get his albums until way, way later than their initial release. I highly recommend getting this version... the 60-page booklet is nothing more but the complete lyrics to each song, but it's a great little companion piece.


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