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Dime Store Magic: Kelley Armstrong Paperback – Aug 25 2009


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Dime Store Magic: Kelley Armstrong + Stolen: Women of the Otherworld + Industrial Magic
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Canada (Aug. 25 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307358011
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307358011
  • Product Dimensions: 13.2 x 2.2 x 20.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 227 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #45,629 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

On the surface, it's a common domestic situation. Typically rebellious teen Savannah is constantly butting heads with protective guardian mother Paige Winterbourne. But the standard teen traumas pale in comparison to Savannah's difficulties. To begin with, her mother Eve, a black witch, was murdered, and now evil telekinetic half-demon Leah O'Donnell is trying to gain custody of her, by legal or foul means. Standing in Leah's way is Paige, a rather typical twentysomething entrepreneur, trying to come to terms with this motherhood thing. That, and her status as leader of the American Coven.

Welcome to East Falls, a sleepy small town outside of Boston that turns out to be a veritable hotbed of occult activity. It is also the locale for Dime Store Magic, a thoroughly entertaining supernatural thriller. As with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Dime Store Magic features a contemporary setting and outwardly normal characters. This device provides scope for humour and social satire, and Kelley Armstrong proves adept at both. For instance, there is Savannah's observation that "all the best sorcerers are lawyers. Well, until they get older and become politicians." In fact, a young sorcerer lawyer, Luis Cortez, becomes Paige and Savannah's best ally in the fight against the evil forces terrorizing them. In Dime Store Magic, the third in Armstrong's Women of the Otherworld series following Bitten and Stolen, she displays a nice ear for dialogue, an imaginative way of describing the differing characteristics of witches, demons, and sorcerers, and skill in piling on the suspense, which adds up to one fun read. --Kerry Doole --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From Publishers Weekly

Unlike the Wizard of Oz, the witches in this sexy supernatural romance, including the murdered mother of 23-year-old heroine Paige Winterbourne, are not evil entities inhabiting a fairy tale land. They're an ages-old race of women so frightened by the possibility of exposure and endangerment that they've allowed their magical powers to atrophy. When Paige inherits her mom's mantle as Coven leader, however, she also inherits caretaking responsibility of Savannah Levine, an extremely gifted but rebellious 13-year-old who possesses her dead mother's penchant for dark magic-and for attracting the unwanted attention of darker magical beings (including Savannah's long-lost sorcerer father). The only person Paige can depend on is the one person she doesn't want to associate with: Lucas Cortez, an endearingly nerdy lawyer/sorcerer ("It was a sad world when a witch had to rely on a work-starved sorcerer for help"). As in Armstrong's debut novel Bitten, this story's special strength lies in its seamless incorporation of the supernatural into the real world. A convincing small-town setting, clever contemporary dialogue, compelling characterizations and a touch of cool humor make the tale's occasional vivid violence palatable and its fantasy elements both gripping and believable.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Avery Greaves TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Feb. 8 2010
Format: Paperback
*MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS*

This is the third book in Kelley Armstrong's "Women of the Otherworld" series and I must say, this is my least favourite book (as of yet) in the series. This book is narrated by Paige, the "know it all" witch we meet in "Stolen". When I first met Paige in "Stolen", I did believe that she was a somewhat annoying character, but looking back I can now say that in the first two books I was biased against all of the other female characters as I found Elena to pretty much the be all/ end all.

Going into "Dime Store Magic" I tried to put aside my preconceived notions of Paige and I do believe that I was successful... To a point. I personally found Paige to be way too 'happy housewife' for me, I like a girl who isn't afraid to kick butt... Paige is very much a homebody- she has the cookies and milk ready for when the kids come home, she is constantly backing,and she only wears skirts as jeans are beneath her. Though I believe that more people can relate to Paige than Elena, I much prefer Elena.

And as much as I love Elena I must admit that I love her partner Clay more. Introduced in "Dime Store Magic" is the male counterpart of Paige, Cortez. To sum it up, Cortez is as interesting as a sack of potatoes. At first I thought that Cortez had potential to be a really intriguing character when he knocked on Paige's door to offer her his assistance, standing there shuffling his papers about, afraid to meet her eyes... I thought he was going to be some loveable dork, but alas, that was not the case. I think what bugged me most about Cortez is his language. Yes, I understand that he is a lawyer and a professional, and therefore he has to uphold a certain persona. But really?
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Format: Kindle Edition
My Review: A couple of days ago I reviewed Shatter Me for the second time. I'm not an avid re-reader (too many books, so little time) but as I looked around my book shelves I noticed a few series that I've failed to keep up on. So I informally named the summer of 2014 as the "remember all the book series that I need to catch up on!" Ya, it's a catchy title.

Kelley Armstrong's wonderful 'Women of the Underworld' series was unfortunately one of these series that I had fallen behind on. And that's sad because I adore it. In my recent review of Shatter Me I had stated that the old adage 'you can never go home' can come into play when rereading a book you once loved. Meaning, that you may find yourself not quite so smitten with the book the second time around. I'm happy to say this isn't the case for Dime Store Magic.

I had first read Dime Store Magic back somewhere around 2006 and liked it. But, at that time, I think my love of all things Elena and Clay (the two main characters in the first two books in the series - Bitten and Stolen) kind of overshadowed what Armstrong was trying to do with Paige in Dime Store Magic because this time around I loved it. I was really riveted to the story and had a hard time putting the book down. Lots of great supernatural action with well fleshed out characters = a truly great read.

I've waxed poetic about this series by one of my favourite Canadian authors time and again on this blog so I won't tell you to go out and pick up Bitten (the first book in the series) ASAP just because I've gotten more people than I can count hooked on this series.
I won't tell you to but I highly advise it. ;)

Highly recommended (but begin with Bitten and read in order!
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By J. Scully TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Jan. 25 2010
Format: Paperback
Dime Store Magic sets itself apart from the first two Women of the Otherworld novels, by having Paige the young witch we met in Stolen narrate the story rather than the Werewolf Elena who had been our point of view thus far. At first I found the switch a bit distracting and had a hard time adjusting to Paige as the narrator - especially when Paige and Elena were talking on the phone! But as the story progressed I grew to love Paige, and stopped feeling the absence of the werewolves.

While I'm still looking forward to returning to Elena's stories, once I got into Paige's world, I really enjoyed getting to know her and Savannah. As with the first two novels in the series, Armstrong creates layered and likable characters, who are both flawed and endearing at the same time. While Paige comes across a little spoiled when we meet her in Stolen, it's clear that she's maturing quickly since she's been charged with taking care of Savannah. Savannah is now the spoiled one, but as an adolescent girl, she's supposed to be a bit of nightmare, and I felt that the portrayal was realistic. One character that I very much dislike is Leah, but considering she is the villain of the story, I think that's the way it's intended to be. New arrival Lucas Cortez on the other hand, is charming pretty much from the minute we met him. Even when we're not sure which side he's really on, I found I couldn't help but like Lucas, and was rooting for him to be one of the good guys.

The overall plot to steal Savannah made for a great story, but I also found some of the other developments in this book intriguing as they allow for interesting new stories in the future. One of the ones I found most intriguing was the fact that Paige is has been exiled from the Coven.
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