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Dixie & the Dominion: Canada, the Confederacy, and the War for the Union [Hardcover]

Adam Mayers
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Book Description

Oct. 1 2003

Dixie & the Dominion is a compelling look at how the U.S. Civil War was a shared experience that shaped the futures of both Canada and the United States. The book focuses on the last year of the war, between April of 1864 and 1865. During that 12-month period, the Confederate States sent spies and saboteurs to Canada on a secret mission. These agents struck fear along the frontier and threatened to draw Canada and Great Britain into the war.

During that same time, Canadians were making their own important decisions. Chief among them was the partnership between Liberal reformer George Brown and Conservative chieftain John A. Macdonald. Their unlikely coalition was the force that would create the Dominion of Canada in 1867, and it was the pressure of the war - with its threat to the colonies' security - that was a driving force behind this extraordinary pact.


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Review

Dixie & the Dominion is a compelling look at how the U.S. Civil War was a shared experience that shaped the futures of both Canada and the United States. The book focuses on the last year of the war, between April of 1864 and 1865. During that 12-month period, the Confederate States sent spies and saboteurs to Canada on a secret mission. These agents struck fear along the frontier and threatened to draw Canada and Great Britain into the war.

During that same time, Canadians were making their own important decisions. Chief among them was the partnership between Liberal reformer George Brown and Conservative chieftain John A. Macdonald. Their unlikely coalition was the force that would create the Dominion of Canada in 1867, and it was the pressure of the war - with its threat to the colonies' security - that was a driving force behind this extraordinary pact.



"An entertaining story, one which given the widespread Canadian lack of understanding of our own history, is a useful addition to our literature." -Claire Hoy, Toronto Star, February 29, 2004

"...Mayers' book is a fascinating one, taking a look at a side of early Canadian history that isn't very well known to all Canadians." -Shelf Life September 2004

"Dixie and the Dominion is a popular but seriously thought-out work that shows once again how the Confederate States, for all the brilliance of so many of their military leaders, were quite hopeless in the subtler forms of warfare." (Vancouver Sun 2003-11-22)

"Adam Mayers shaltters the too-common perception that the American Civil War occurred in a vacuum. He shows us the neighbor nations of North America affecting one another deeply and enduringly in a turbulent historical moment that was formative not only for the United States, but also for Canada." (Jim Kushlan Civil War Times Illustrated)

About the Author

Adam Mayers is a senior editor at thestar.com, the Toronto Star's website, and a frequent contributor to Civil War Times Illustrated, the largest general interest magazine on the Civil War. His articles focus on Canadian connections to the conflict.

Mr. Mayers has a degree in psychology from McMaster, a graduate degree in journalism from the City University of London, and an MBA from McMaster. He lives in Oakville, Ontario with his wife and two children. He has always believed that Canada has more history than geography.


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Most helpful customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Canada's American Civl War Jan. 5 2004
Format:Hardcover
This is a great book that is a well-written popular work that shows how the Civil War was a North American, rather than just American war.
I had no idea of the connection of Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth to Canada or of any of the Confederate guerilla operations in Quebec and Ontario. Nor did I know that Canadians were very sympathetic to the South and not because of slavery.
It's also interesting that some Canadian political institutions were designed so Canada could avoid a similar experience.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Canada's American Civil War Jan. 5 2004
Format:Hardcover
This is a great book that is a well-written popular work that shows how the Civil War was a North American, rather than just American war.
I had no idea of the connection of Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth to Canada or of any of the Confederate guerilla operations in Quebec and Ontario. Nor did I know that Canadians were very sympathetic to the South and not because of slavery.
It's also interesting that some Canadian political institutions were designed so Canada could avoid a similar experience.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.3 out of 5 stars  3 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent treatment of understudied aspect of the Civil War Jan. 20 2014
By Deborah K. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a tightly-organized little work on the relationship between British Canada and the Confederacy. Ultimately, the author demonstrates the influence of the American Civil War on the formation of the Canadian Dominion, as the title suggests. However, in the process he opens up an overdue discussion of the "Northwest Conspiracy," an aspect of American Civil War history that has long gone ignored. While there will always be a market for the "Virginia School" of Civil War scholarship, as handed down by Douglas Southall Freeman, it's good to finally see some decent work being done emphasizing the international aspect of this conflict. I recommend this book in connection with John Headley's 1906 first-hand account of Confederate Operations in Canada.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Canada's American Civl War Jan. 5 2004
By michael jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a great book that is a well-written popular work that shows how the Civil War was a North American, rather than just American war.
I had no idea of the connection of Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth to Canada or of any of the Confederate guerilla operations in Quebec and Ontario. Nor did I know that Canadians were very sympathetic to the South and not because of slavery.
It's also interesting that some Canadian political institutions were designed so Canada could avoid a similar experience.
4.0 out of 5 stars Canada's American Civil War Jan. 5 2004
By michael jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is a great book that is a well-written popular work that shows how the Civil War was a North American, rather than just American war.
I had no idea of the connection of Lincoln's assassin John Wilkes Booth to Canada or of any of the Confederate guerilla operations in Quebec and Ontario. Nor did I know that Canadians were very sympathetic to the South and not because of slavery.
It's also interesting that some Canadian political institutions were designed so Canada could avoid a similar experience.
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