Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair: Gunsmithing at Home and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair: Gunsmithing at Home on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair: Gunsmithing at Home [Paperback]

Edward A Matunas


Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $9.99  
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $16.00  
Paperback, Aug. 8 2004 --  
There is a newer edition of this item:
Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair: Gunsmithing at Home Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair: Gunsmithing at Home
CDN$ 16.00
In Stock.
Amazon.ca's 2014 Books Gift Guide
2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Book Description

Aug. 8 2004 Outdoorsman's Edge

Learn how to diagnose and repair a broad selection of popular hunting firearms including rifles, shotguns, and handguns in the convenience of the home, safely and inexpensively. Also included is a special section covering disassembly, repair, and reassembly of seven of the most popular firearms: 700, Remington 1100, Remington 870, Winchester 94, Savage 110, Marlin 336, and Marlin 70. The instructions are fully illustrated with photos and drawings as well as exploded views and parts lists, and much of this information can be applied to other guns with similar actions.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Creative Homeowner (Aug. 8 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 158011203X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1580112031
  • Product Dimensions: 25.3 x 21.4 x 1.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 612 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #944,744 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Edward A. Matunas was a practicing gunsmith for 12 years, a director of a ballistics laboratory, a designer of reloading tools, and a national sales manager for Winchester-Western. He lives in Clinton, Connecticut.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
Before a firearm is subjected to any home repair attempts it should be absolutely in need of the planned repair. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.9 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Terrific value at this price May 31 2007
By Joe D - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Most of us have come to understand the differences between performing routine maintenance and accessory installation, and chambering and fitting a new barrel. If you are standing in the midst of expensive machinery, and you know how to use the equipment with a quality result, you don't need this book. If you'd like to install your own scopes, recoil pads, replace small parts and tinker with a gun to improve its accuracy, you would probably find this book to be useful.

"Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair" is presented into five logical parts: An Approach to Gunsmithing in the Home Workshop, Basic Maintenance and Repair, Disassembly - Repair and Reassembly of Popular Firearms, Advanced Techniques, and The Final Steps. The book begins by showing ways of assessing if your firearms need work or maintenance, then it move on to a chapter dedicated to determining the scope of work that could reasonably attempted. There is a chapter presenting common and useful hand tools and a brief section covering frequently used power tools. The section that follows, which addresses the work area, special tools and parts supplies is pretty sketchy. A chapter titled "Thinking Like a Gunsmith" is thoughtful, but not substantial enough in content to assist someone in acting on some of the suggestions.

"Basic Maintenance" is more of a page filler. It mostly advises how to clean a firearm, something that could be found in many sources, including packaged in a cleaning kit. A follow on section covering analyzing and correcting accuracy problems is well written and, based on my own experience, would be very useful to almost anyone. "Ten Easy Gunsmithing Projects" is OK, but the projects are a little specialized and most lead to purchasing tools or material Brownells. The section isn't bad, I just believe there are more universal and common projects, and I am not taking a poke at Brownells. They are one of the best tool and material sources out there for us gun owners.

There is an excellent section regarding proper scope mounting that results in centered optics and proper hardware alignment, and included the proper use of shims under mounts for the purpose of leveling. This is an area so fundamental to good accuracy and frequently people don't take the time to perform this task correctly. The section on various firearm disassembly and assembly is actually very good. The author includes popular firearms, very good illustrations and photos, assembly tips, and coverage of common problem correction for each specific firearm.

Some of the information offered in other sections is not so directly useful. You are not going to learn how to checker from half a page of text and one picture of a checkering tool; artistic craft work takes a lot of talent and practice to master. There is an eight page chapter, chapter 23, dedicated to drilling and tapping a firearm for sights that is decently done, but you would need to purchase a $160 B Square Professional Drill Jig or a $400+ Foster Scope Mounting Jig to do the job, and you would have to possess the basic skills of drilling and tapping and how to properly set up fixtures. There is a good information addressing the repair of stocks and fitting a recoil pad, but they all presume prior woodworking and machine operating skills and the use of some specialized machinery and fixtures. Work of this types, to justify the cost of fixtures, needs to be a frequent requirement or it is easier and less expensive to drop the gun off with a good gunsmith. Still, it doesn't hurt to know what you are asking a gunsmith to accomplish when you purchase services.
22 of 27 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Love the book, not the author Aug. 20 2005
By Sam_Liz - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This is a great book for people aspiring to become a professional gunsmith. It may have some usefulness for the normal gun owner as well. The detail and comments provided show this book was written by someone with an extreme amount of knowledge and experience in the subject. Unfortunately the author realizes this and wrote this book to reflect it. His egotistical lectures of exactly what the reader should do go beyond what I expected to gain from this book. Then there are the contradictions that lead me to not believe in the author's knowledge as much as I did when I started.

If you want a very technical guide on how to become a professional gunsmith, this is the book for you. If you want a Do-It-Yourself Gun Repair Manual (Gunsmithing at Home) look elsewhere.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best for the DIYer April 4 2009
By Gary Tooker - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book does contain very useful bits of information, and certainly for the price is worth considering adding to the library for any dedicated enthusiast. However as another reviewer suggested, the tone of this book really is more geared towards an aspiring professional gunsmith than it is for the typical DIYer who is looking to do basic tasks. Therefore the title of the book in my opinion is misleading.

Another thing is that at least half of the information in this book is specialized. What I mean is that the tasks are geared for a specific project on a specific weapon. Certainly while the principles of a given job should carry over to similar rifles, it is a point worth considering for someone who is looking for more generalized knowledge.

Also, some information I do not necessarily agree with either. Case and point is the section on cleaning. His basic idea of cleaning is that after 15-20 shots, the rifle should be cleaned essentially for every shot fired, and he suggests that the procedure (because of soaking times) can take up to a week to perform! In my opinion that is simply being too anal, and I doubt even necessary (hunting rifles) or even desirable (many will claim... and I tend to agree... that EXCESSIVE cleaning does more harm than good because of the wear and tear it creates). Never mind that realistically I think few people have the time or inclination to be that slavishly devoted to cleaning their weapons!

Not bad, but overall I feel that for the DIYer, Sweeney's book "Gunsmithing Rifles" is a better choice.
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good reading Oct. 6 2005
By S. R. Karby - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
A great general reference. Ed did a great job with this one. I can say confidently, I enjoyed this book. Not a bad investment if you want to get a small taste of the craft. Enjoy, and thanks Ed!
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing Read on Gun Repairs Jan. 28 2014
By BVC - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The author spends the first 40 pages explaining tools and work area set-up - a bit much, I think, Based on the title, I expected detailed information on how to perform a broad range of gun repeirs. There were a few of these specifics, but the author picked seven weapons and gives us parts breakdowns on them - fine if you happen to own one of this limited number of weapons - and general repairs on those. He also provides a few generic repair procedures, but not nearly enough to justify the title.

Many of the other repairs require tools, jigs, and equipment not likely to be owned by most do-it-yourselfers. Perhaps my expectations were unrealistic, but I doubt I'll be doing much of my own gun repair work if this book is my only guide.

I would have expected bluing to be covered, since it can be done at home with care. But there was just a brief mention of a "touch-up" bluing kit and no information on refinishing the metal parts.

Essentially, the book tells us that, unless we're already pretty sharp on gun repair, we'd better hand off the job to a professional. Disappointing.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback