Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Domestic Tranquility: A Brief Against Feminism Paperback – Sep 1 1998


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 44.54 CDN$ 17.07

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Spence Publishing Company (September 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1890626090
  • ISBN-13: 978-1890626099
  • Product Dimensions: 22.4 x 15.2 x 3.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 748 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,600,721 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on Dec 8 2003
Format: Hardcover
There have been a number of good books to appear lately offering a critique of feminism. Perhaps one of the best is this volume. Although it has been around for some years now, it still remains one of the most comprehensive, articulate and well-researched books to take on the excesses of feminism.
A major thesis of this volume is that while feminism may appear to be anti-men, it is even more so anti-women, at least women of a certain stripe. Wives and homemakers are the real target of radical feminists, insists Graglia, and she spends a good part of this hefty tome (450 pages) in documenting this claim.
The author, who is a lawyer by profession, but a homemaker by choice, has the intellectual firepower needed to take on the heavyweights of the feminists movement. The thoughts and writings of Friedan, Steinem, Greer, Millet, de Beauvoir, and all the other major movers and shakers in the feminist movement are here carefully evaluated, and their antipathy to wives and families are carefully assessed.
Solid chapters explore the rise of modern feminism, the feminist agenda, the totalitarian impulse in feminism, the push for androgyny, and the attack on the institutions of marriage and the traditional family, among other things.
The author is especially adept at showing how women cannot have it all, at least not at the same time. The push for climbing the corporate ladder invariably takes a toll on child rearing and family, and many women have suffered as a result of buying the feminist line on this issue.
She tackles a number of other myths, such as the idea that gender is simply a social construct, and the idea that motherhood and homemaking are somehow second class lifestyles. She shows how women have been the big losers in the feminist-promoted sexual revolution.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
This book is very enjoyable to read, especially if you are a full-time mom or homemaker. It provides detailed and well-researched arguments to support the author's contention that there are some major drawbacks to the results of the feminist movement, which began in the 60s. While the obvious advantage to the feminist movement of women being able to pursue the career of their choice is evident, Ms. Graglia argues persuasively that the feminists have denigrated the traditional mother and homemaker in the process with sometimes horrible results for children and families. The mass surrogation of childrearing and the mass exodus of women out of the home and into the workforce have had numerous detrimental effects on our society, as explained eloquently and in great detail by Ms. Graglia. This book is a must read; and although lengthy, it is easily understood and very informative. Thank you, Ms. Graglia for telling the other side to this story.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By S.R.W. Phillips on May 20 2004
Format: Hardcover
I must, of course, preface this review by saying that I am a feminist. However, my mother was a homemaker, and my older sister is also a homemaker. That being said, I can also understand why Graglia would be so offended by the things that feminists have said about homemakers in the past. I think my sister and my mother are both hard workers and my sister is, as my mother was, devoted to raising her children in a traditional setting and being a full-time mom. However, the context in which these comments were made cannot be denied; these overzealous women made generalizations about homemakers just as many blacks, when they were the victims of oppression, must have made hasty generalizations about whites. This is something that just happens, right or wrong, when you are so passionate about an issue, idea, or belief.
There are several parts of this book with which I take exception. They are, but not limited to, the following:
1) She blames women whose husbands molest their daughters because the wives should be sexually satisfying their husbands. This does not address the issue of pedophilia and the perverseness of a man who would sexually abuse his own daughter. In no way should the woman be blamed when her husband obviously has more serious problems than an unsatisfactory sex life. If the mother is ever to blame, it is in those instances in which she knew it was going on and allowed it to continue.
2) She presents what I view as flawed statistics. Graglia states that 90% of all births to black mothers aged 15-19 are illegitimate. This obviously makes perfect sense, since the average age of marriage is currently 24 for women and 26 for men. A married eighteen- or nineteen-year-old is rare and surely most women younger than this are not married.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I made it through the introduction and most of the first chapter of this book. By that time I had smoke coming out of my ears and my blood pressure had gone way up. This woman managed to trash working women, ethnic groups, women who choose not to have children, and women who, because of economics, have to work. But when she said that children of working mothers always turn out bad I had to quit reading. She managed to quote that old standby that working women were "taking jobs away from men". And she brought up the person that she sees as a purveyor of evil, Hillary Clinton. She should read Proverbs 31:10-31.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Product Images from Customers

Most recent customer reviews

Search


Feedback