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Don`T Look Now


Price: CDN$ 74.68
Only 1 left in stock.
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2 new from CDN$ 54.99 5 used from CDN$ 35.96

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Product Details

  • Language: English, French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Paramount
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000069I0A

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kona TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 14 2009
Format: DVD
After the death of their daughter, Laura and John Baxter (Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland) are living in Venice, where John is restoring an old church. They meet a strange pair of women, one of whom is a psychic who claims she can see their dead little girl. This fascinates Laura, but then the woman says John is in mortal danger.

This is a very well-made, creepy thriller. Filmed in the shadowy, twisted alleyways of Venice, it is chock full of red herrings and dripping with atmosphere that will keep you on the edge of your seat. Everyone seems to be a potential threat, every action is suspicious, even if we don't know why. And the soundtrack adds just the right eerie touch. Christie is young and beautiful, Sutherland is moody and complex; they have great chemistry together and share a scene that surely should have been rated X.

Based on a story by Daphne du Maurier, this is a dark, dreamlike movie filled with so much tension that you may think twice about that Venetian vacation. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Wendy Kaplan on June 21 2002
Format: VHS Tape
This film, which features Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland at their most young and gorgeous, may be one of the scariest movies ever made.
Based on a Daphne DuMaurier story, it concerns two grieving parents (Christie and Sutherland) who have lost their young daughter in a horrible drowning accident right on their opulent English estate. Mourning beyond reason, the shattered couple goes to Venice, where Sutherland repeatedly sees visions of his dead daughter, always just out of reach.
Through disjointed stream-of-consciousness images, gorgeous views of Venice, lush colors, eerie people with second sight, and one of the most erotic love scenes on film, we feel this couple's anguish, fear and desperate love for one another. And we know, simply by feeling it, that there is great danger lurking just out of sight. But we don't know what it is.
As the suspense builds unbearably, the viewer is mesmerized by the photography, the music, the beauty--and yes, the grief. And when the end comes...well, let's just say that you'll want to leave the lights on for many nights to come.
An absolutely brilliant film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Jan. 31 2002
Format: VHS Tape
The senseless and [accidental?] death of a child. Guilt?
Dim, underlit streets and waterways of Venice. Visions of a small child wearing a hooded red raincoat....... Steamy sex.....A serial killer........A blind psychic.....warnings....and a very sharp straight razor, or two.....and lover's do learn.....
A deliciously dark and brooding concept by auteur Nicholas Roeg ["Bad Timing"]of Daphne Du Maurier's vision of grieving parents Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland, recovering in Venice after the death of their only daughter. AND this movie has one of the best love-scenes ever recorded on film - excellent - not gratuitous or offensive.
VENICE, though, is the Star of this work. Forget any Summer Holiday memories you might still have of this wonderous dreamcity, she really comes to life during the winter! To say more about the plot would be to betray the work, but if you like experiences along the lines of "The Innocents", perhaps even the original "Haunting" - see this one. "Don't Look Now" is kind of the flip-side of Kate Hepburn's "Sunmmertime", even "Lover's Must Learn". It's an odd kaleidoscopic view of the city and its post midnight pulse - but be warned - stay in your hotel room - don't venture out on your own, especially after dark...........those Venetian walkways are still so dimly lit, never quite know what you might find in a doorway, or in the canals for that matter].
A companion-piece? The later "Comfort of Strangers" - equally disturbing, but a great double-bill!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Doug Anderson on Dec 6 2001
Format: VHS Tape
This is an under appreciated mystery. Partly because there were so many occult films made in the early 70's it was easy to lose track of the fact that some of them were much more interesting than others. Roeg is not interested in linear narrative. In fact as a cinematographer he is more interested in using unique shots to give us glimpses into his characters subjective goings on than he is in forwarding a plot. Some call that arty and maybe it is. Roeg began as a cinematographer as Stanley Kubrick did and like Kubrick he has learned that camera angles and lighting can tell as much story as events and dialogue, both are masters at the art of cinema so perhaps that makes them arty. However Kubrick never forgot to tell a story while performing his magnificent art, Roeg sometimes forgets that without a story the technical sleights of hand sometimes seem wasted or meaningless. I think this film has a lot going for it and may be enjoyed for the way it looks and the way it keeps you wondering what is going on. I like that kind of movie, there were a lot of them in this time period perhaps it was the influence of the European directors. Roeg certainly learned some tricks from Antonioni, another brilliant technician.
In addition to all the impressive and exciting cinematic devices being put to use there is a barely discernable story being told. Nothing or not much is literally told to us but we slowly gather impressions, bits of data, and possibilities begin to form as to what really is going on. The fact that it is based on a short story by a mystery writer should clue you in that a)its a mystery and b)there is not much story development.
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