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Don't Shoot Me I'm Only The Piano Player Original recording remastered, Extra tracks


Price: CDN$ 11.18 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
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32 new from CDN$ 5.53 9 used from CDN$ 9.96

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Frequently Bought Together

Don't Shoot Me I'm Only The Piano Player + Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (Remastered) + Honky Chateau
Price For All Three: CDN$ 32.47

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Feb. 28 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording remastered, Extra tracks
  • Label: Island
  • ASIN: B000001EG2
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #19,943 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Daniel
2. Teacher I Need You
3. Elderberry Wine
4. Blues For My Baby And Me
5. Midnight Creeper
6. Have Mercy On The Criminal
7. I'm Gonna Be A Teenage Idol
8. Texan Love Song
9. Crocodile Rock
10. High Flying Bird
11. Screw You (Young Man's Blues)
12. Jack Rabbit
13. Whenever You're Ready (We'll Go Steady Again)
14. Skyline Pigeon (Piano Version)

Product Description

Product Description

Classic rock 'n' roll and '70s pop came together seamlessly on this 1973 LP, another #1. This has his mega-hit Crocodile Rock and smash ballad Daniel ; this CD adds Jack Rabbit; Skyline Pigeon (piano version), and two more bonuses!

Amazon.ca

One of the best entries from Elton John and Bernie Taupin's remarkably successful mid-1970s run, this album still holds up well over a quarter of a century after its release. Even casual fans will recognise "Daniel", "Elderberry Wine", and "Crocodile Rock", but "Teacher I Need You", "Have Mercy on the Criminal" and "I'm Going to Be a Teenage Idol" are equally good. Elton's backing band at the time (guitarist Davey Johnstone, bassist Dee Murray, and drummer Nigel Olsson) was easily his best, and producer Gus Dudgeon and orchestral arranger Paul Buckmaster bathed the tracks in a warm and enticing glow. The only complaint is that, due to its size, the CD reissue doesn't remotely do justice to the colourful packaging of the original album. --Dan Epstein

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 22 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is another of my Top 10 Elton John albums, and one I can easily listen to more than once in a single sitting. It's definitely another example of Elton's best work.
As far as the tracks go, every one on this album is great. But as was the case on Elton's self-titled album, the hits (with the exception of "Daniel", probably one of his best ballads) are not the standouts; the lesser-known songs are. The really notable tracks are "Elderberry Wine" (a great pop-rock song with very good piano by Elton), "Blues For Baby & Me" (a lovely ballad that I'm amazed wasn't a hit), "Midnight Creeper" (a great, though slightly disturbing rocker), "Have Mercy On The Criminal" (another great rocker with a dramatic, emotional vocal by Elton), and "High Flying Bird" (a poetic, touching ballad with great vocals by Elton and his band).
The remaining tracks ("Teacher I Need You", "I'm Gonna Be A Teenage Idol", "Crocodile Rock", and "Texas Love Song") are also good, but for different reasons. "Teacher I Need You" and "I'm Gonna Be A Teenage Idol" are both great "story songs". "Crocodile Rock" was, of course, the other hit from this album, and is a fun song to listen and sing to. "Texas Love Song" is another good "story song", and is an excellent (and successful) attempt at country on Elton's part.
Though not quite at the level of something like Tumbleweed Connection, his self-titled album, Honky Chateau, or Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (which was released right after this), this is still a very good album. It has some great stories, some very singable tracks, and quite a few unknown gems. Definitely a good addition to an Elton John collection.
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By Slokes on Feb. 11 2004
Format: Audio CD
The bad news for Elton's hard rock fans in 1973 was that the guy who made "Madman Across The Water" less than two years before had left the building. In his place was a pop craftsman with a keen interest in making music for the masses.
The good news, of course, was Elton's arrival as a full-fledged pop star came with some terrific music, still very enjoyable more than a quarter century later. Actually, his pop leanings were in evidence in 1972 with the release of "Honky Chateau," but this time the gloves are off, and his aim is clearly Casey Kasem country. The result was his first two top-five singles in the U.S., the chart-topping "Crocodile Rock" and #2 hit, "Daniel." "Don't Shoot Me" reached the top of the charts, too, just as "Honky Chateau" did.
If you like "Honky Chateau," chances are good you will like "Don't Shoot Me, I'm Only The Piano Player," which in many ways feels like a sequel. The title, for instance, sounds like something the singer in "Honky Cat" might have said if offered an extra chorus. "Crocodile Rock" deals with a faithless girlfriend named Susie, while someone with the same name and inclinations also appears in a song named after her on "Honky Chateau."
The two hits on "Don't Shoot Me," painful as it is to say, aren't as enduring as the hits on "Honky Chateau." Frankly, both "Daniel" and "Crocodile Rock" suffer from radio overplay in a way "Honky Cat" and "Rocket Man" don't. That's not to say they aren't great songs, just less enduring. Elton works in some interesting keyboard tones with "Daniel" and plays to the '50s nostalgia craze (quoting Pat Boone, ye gads!) with "Croc Rock," a song I grooved to as a youngster when it first came out and dearly love today. Yet when it comes on my stereo, my focus sometimes wanders a bit.
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Format: Audio CD
After "Honky Chateau" and its subsequent hit singles "Honky Cat" and "Rocket Man" proved Elton could rock as good as he did ballads, Elton shot to # 1 with 1973's "Don't Shoot Me I'm Only The Piano", a classic album with great songs from start to finish.
The classic Elton sound can be found here, especially on the hits "Crocodile Rock" and "Daniel", which still sound as fresh and as innovative as they did 31 years ago. He shows that he still is a true balladeer with the heartshattering "Blues For My Baby And Me" and "High Flyin' Bird" (the latter, with its surreal harmonies, is a sheer Beach Boys tribute). Elton the rocker bursts out with "I'm Gonna Be A Teenage Idol", "Elderberry Wine" and the Bobby Vee - inspired "Teacher, I Need You".
The bonus tracks give the album some extra strength. I especially the carefree "Jack Rabbit" and his aching remake of "Skyline Pigeon" that was unjustly banished to a b - side when it was first released. "Screw You" and "Whenever You're Ready (We'll Go Steady Again)" were also very good.
I really think that this a truly essential album. It is Elton nearing his peak, showing that he was a predominant musical force that would be around making classic records and albums for years and years to come.
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Format: Audio CD
This album should be reguarded as more than just the album with "Crocodile Rock" and "Daniel" on it. Those are two excellent songs but admit it, they do get annoying after you play them over and over again. This album should be cherished more for the songs that are complete unknowns unless you're a die-hard Elton fan, such as myself. Elton's piano playing is at its best here. His ivory tickling at the beginning of "Teacher I Need You" is reminiscent of Jerry Jee Lewis, and his insescent banging during the intro of "Elderberry Wine" is pure Elton. He proves once again that he's at his best with a ballad with beautiful "Blues For My Baby And Me", with a flourishing wa-wa guitar solo by Davey Johnstone, who also plays sitar on the track. The menacing "Midnight Creeper" is another look of Elton and Bernie's comical dark side. He also proves he can write straight rock with "I'm Going To Be A Teenage Idol". And he attacks social issues with "Texas Love Song", which just so happens to be my favorite Elton track here. But it's "High Flying Bird" that makes the album. Elton's powerful vocals and Nigel, Davey and Dee's hauntingly beautiful backing vocals beats
out all the other songs. The bonus tracks give the album an extra punch, most notably the piano version of Elton's classic "Skyline Pigeon". Buy this album.
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