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Dove in the Window School & Library Binding – May 1999


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School & Library Binding, May 1999

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--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • School & Library Binding
  • Publisher: San Val (May 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0613427076
  • ISBN-13: 978-0613427074
  • Product Dimensions: 18.1 x 10.5 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 218 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)

Product Description

From Kirkus Reviews

A fifth go-around for Benni Harper (Goose in the Pond, 1997, not reviewed, etc.), the ranch-bred widow of Jack Harper, whos now married to San Celica, California, Police Chief Gabe Ortiz. San Celica is having a Heritage Days celebration, and Benni, as curator of the Folk Arts Museum and Artists Co-op, is in the thick of it. Her elegant southern cousin Emory Littleton (with a mega-crush on Bennis best friend Elvia Aragon) is staying with her, and at her fathers ranch, presided over by Grandmother Dove, a huge family gathering is in progress. Disaster strikes when talented young photographer Shelby Johnson is found dead one early morningmurder or accident? Ranch-hand Kip Waterman and hard-drinking Wade Harper, brother of Bennis late husband, had come to blows over Shelby the night before. Matters worsen when, days latter, Kips drowned body is discovered behind the Frio Saloon. Through it all, Benni has to calm her artist friends Olivia Contreras and Greer Shannon, deal with a zillion chores, and cope with the unexpected presence of renowned photographer Isaac Lyons, Shelbys stepgrandfather, who seems smitten with Grandma Dove. In the end, its Bennis investigative collaboration with Isaac (over Gabes strong objections) that brings a killer to a kind of justice. The quest for whodunit is all but buried under Bennis breezy down-home chatter, sometimes mawkish soul-searching, and descriptions of the celebrations endless eventsfrom the local gallerys show of women artists to the Cow-Plop contest. But Bennis warmly likable persona makes it all worthwhileespecially for lovers of the cozy genre. -- Copyright ©1998, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Earlene Fowler was raised in La Puente, California, by a Southern mother and a Western father. She lives in Southern California with her husband, Allen, a large number of quilts, and twenty pairs of cowboy boots.
--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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By A Customer on June 14 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I want to like the Benni Harper mysteries, I really do. I like the setting, I like the characters who surround Benni, I like the mysteries, which are well-handled, I even like the quilting connection, but I just can't like Benni. On the surface, she's everything a heroine should be, but she can't stop whining about her husband wanting to protect and care for her. As if that were something disgusting and shameful, that he shouldn't do. He's her HUSBAND! And he's a cop! Of course he wants to protect her! Would she somehow be happier if he didn't care what happened to her, and sent her off on her amateur detecting missions with a quick wave and nothing more? Surely, if he were in danger, she'd want to protect him. Wouldn't she? I don't know, but I'm starting to not care. The man is a saint, she treats him like dirt, and I don't know if I want to spend another 300 pages with someone I think is self-centered and whiny, when she has no reason to be. It's hard to like the book, if the main character is not likeable.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Earlene Fowler has peopled her Bennie Harper series with plenty of enjoyable small-town characters and an authentic, humorous, feet-on-the-coffeetable ambiance. Two things, though, were enough for me to lop off some stars in my rating.
I took off one star for the irritating practice of mentioning an event several times throughout the book--in this case, a "hot" date between Benni's best friend and her cousin--and then having the event happen sometime out of the time frame of the book. Unfair, annoying, and unnecessary, near as I can tell.
I took off another star because a young photographer gave Bennie an album of her pictures on page 13. When the photographer is subsequently killed, I waited--and waited--and waited--for her to finally remember the album and look at it. It's one of those times when you want to shout at the character for being such a numbskull. On page 289, I could finally rest easy. I love San Celine; I think its inhabitants are a lot of fun, so much so that I resented being tripped up by the author and reminded that this is, after all, a manufactured story.
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By A Customer on March 19 1998
Format: Hardcover
San Celina, California native Benni Harper is curator of the Josiah Sinclair Folk Art Museum and Artist's Co-op. Her spouse of nine months, Gabe Ortiz is the local chief of police. The couple are looking forward to a blissful day at the annual Ramsey day after Thanksgiving barbecue. When Wade Harper, brother of her deceased first husband, suddenly appears, Benni is flooded with memories of the man she once loved. Gabe is unhappy with Wade's appearance because he does not trust him and is jealous of the shared memories of a ghost that he feels he cannot compete against.
However, all the personal feelings are placed on hold when one of the local artists is murdered on Ramsey property just hours after a fiery incident involving Wade. When the victim's boy friend is also killed, the sheriff considers Wade as the prime suspect. In spite of Gabe's misgivings, Benni begins to investigate the double murders so that she can keep Wade free and she can close the book on her past. What she has not yet learned is that she has placed her own life in great peril.
DOVE IN THE WINDOW is a first rate relationship drama that is wrapped inside an intriguing who-done-it. Earlene Fowler pays as much detail to Benni's relationships and mental state as she does to the crime drama. This dual technique brilliantly merges together, turning the novel into an emotionally satisfying mystery. The addition of old friends as secondary characters leave the audience feeling as if they are visiting the small California town for the festival. Ms. Fowler is a very talented writer, who gets her readers involved with the mystery and the characters. This is a series worth reading.
Harriet Klausner
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By A Customer on April 26 1999
Format: Hardcover
As usual, Earlene Fowler invites us into her story with quick-witted dialog and characters drawn with razor-edged believability. Inasmuch as it's sometimes difficult to discern her work as mystery or romance, the blend is pleasing and effective. As the reader, I found myself trying to guess not only "whodunit" but also the conclusion to the numerous forays into new relationships pursued by the characters. I was particularly fond of Fowler's decision to form a romantic link for Grandma Dove, a woman in her 70s, because it challenges the reader to accept that romance is not dead after a certain age. Among the humorous (and often balanced) male-bashing and details of the disciplines of photography and cattle castration were poignant reflections on the complexities of family and marital relationships as well as on the roles of women and the aging. The overall result (all murder and motives aside) was an amusing and sweet story.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
In this fifth book of the Earlene Fowler quilting series, the community of San Celina is getting ready for Heritage Days and Benni Harper, the curator of the local folk art museum is encouraging quilters, painters and photographers to complete their projects for the show. An exhibit of women artists who specialize in Western scenes is expected to be very popular with the visitors.
Benni and her husband Gabe are still working out the kinks in their new marriage and the surprise visit of a former brother-in-law causes dissention between them. Grandmother Dove is as feisty as ever and cousin Emory visits from Arkansas. At the annual Harper family barbecue, a young and talented photographer is found dead and Benni's concerned because the young woman had confided a serious problem to her.
There's always a lot going on in these stories and the author does a great job of keeping the reader interested in all of the different plots.
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