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Dracula [Blu-ray] [Import]


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Product Details

  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Danish, Finnish, Norwegian, Swedish
  • Dubbed: French, Italian, German, Spanish
  • Subtitles for the Hearing Impaired: English
  • Audio Description: None
  • Region: All Regions
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (129 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B008LSAP30
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #102,668 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 20 2004
Format: DVD
While I fully understand the urge to swap this older release for one of the new Universal sets (Dracula or the deluxe Monster Legacy box), I implore you not to do it. Not only is the sound much better on this earlier release, but the new set contains the censored print that was originally released in 1931 in which Dracula's "death groans" are highly abbreviated. The contents of the two disks seem to be identical but the quality isn't. If you can put up with the very real possibility of having to repeatedly return sets in order to obtain one that performs perfectly, the Monster Legacy box is a good deal (especially at Amazon's price) and its transfers of the other films in the Universal series are very good, but this film is the exception. THIS ONE'S A KEEPER!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 8 2007
Format: DVD
Bram Stoker's vampire novel has been remade dozens of times, but perhaps the best adaptation is the classic Bela Lugosi version. Fairly faithful to the novel and dripping with gothic atmosphere, what really makes "Dracula" stand out is the bone-chillingly charming performance by Lugosi.

A solicitor, Renfield (Dwight Frye), is travelling to Count Dracula's castle for a real estate deal, despite the locals freaking out and crossing themselves whenever Dracula's mentioned. He soon finds out why -- the Count (Lugosi) is a vampire, who enslaves a mad Renfield to his will. Soon after, a ship with a dead crew (and Renfield and Dracula in the hold) arrives in England.

Soon Dracula has moved into his new home, Carfax Abbey, and is insinuating himself with the Seward family -- and especially with pretty Lucy Westenra, who dies of blood loss and is reborn as a vampire. Only the intervention of the mysterious Dr. Van Helsing (Edward Van Sloan) can stop Dracula's attacks in London.

Then there's the Spanish-language one, which is virtually identical and was filmed on the exact same sets, during the hours when the English-language one was not being shot. Same settings, same marks, same cinematography, many of the same scenes -- although it's much longer. It's excellent, and although it lacks that iconic intensity that Lugosi brought the English-language film, it's full of atmosphere and good acting.

Technically "Dracula" wasn't the first adaptation of "Dracula" -- that honor belongs to "Nosferatu" -- but it was the first to actually tackle the storyline in Stoker's book. And to date, it's perhaps the only to portray everyone's favorite vampire with the necessary atmosphere -- ominous, dignified and creepy.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
And so, after all these years, I've finally seen the 1931 Dracula.

I've actually read Bram Stoker's original novel near exactly twenty years ago. After I struggled some with some of the odd words within the old English prose I stuck with it and discovered a story that was genuinely eerie and quite atmospheric. I will say that I wouldn't advise reading this at 2 or 3AM as I did---it gave me weird dreams. Since then I've seen Francis Ford Coppola's version, Bram Stoker's Dracula, and the silent Nosferatu. Now I've finally seen the famed 1931 version.

I'm not a fan of silent films in general, but Nosferatu was effective in creating a genuine atmosphere and sense of unease on some level. In it's own way it's a more faithful adaptation of Stoker's novel than the 1931 film. And while Coppola's version suffers from some poor acting I do feel it visually brings the original novel to life. But while the silent film and Coppola's each have their strengths and flaws neither of them have had the enduring impact of the '31 film.

Watching Dracula I instantly recognized where so many cliches and conventions began in regards to horror films in general and vampire stories in particular. Knowing this allowed me to look past now familiar conventions and experience the film on its own terms.

Candidly, and since I can't really escape the sum of my own experiences, I find aspects of this film rather stagey and theatrical. A little more nuance would be appreciated. Yet I also see that this film could also be watched pretty much as a silent film and this isn't surprising considering it was made still early after the introduction of sound in movies. With that perspective I can overlook much of the stage like and theatrical aspects.
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Format: VHS Tape
I am Drac-u-la , I bid you welcome, I never drink ... Wine
The 3 lines that famoused (new word of mine) Bela Lugosi and made him The Infinitive Count Dracula
Mr Reinsfield travels to transylvania to sail sum property to Dracula in england
Dracula welcomes him in for a feast and wine
while reinsfield is collectin all of the papers he accidently paper cuts his finger (which he really did in real life!)
Dracula goes for his neck but notices the crucifix on reinsfield's neck so he waits until reinsfield goes to bed and he pulls the chain off
all of a sudden reinsfield feels faint and passes out
leaving a feast for dracula
The next part of the film is the part of the ship which is very short
all of the passengers on board perrish from the hurricane or whatever as it travels to england accept for a mad man named reinsfield and a undead freak in the coffin named dracula (haha)
so dracula arrives to england and start's puttin the bite on the british
a classic i tell u and every1 who loves horror movies should have this!!!!
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