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Dracula Paperback – Jan 1 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Broadview Pr; New edition edition (1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551111365
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551111360
  • Product Dimensions: 14.2 x 21.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 599 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (274 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #408,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
3 May. Bistritz. - Left Munich at 8.35 p.m. on 1st May, arriving at Vienna early next morning; should have arrived at 6.46, but train was an hour late. Read the first page
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bernie TOP 50 REVIEWER on July 25 2010
Format: Paperback
Surprisingly "Denn die Toten reiten schnell" or "For the dead travel fast" is more than an opening line to this tale of love in the dangerous moon light. After watching several Drac movies and a few Nosferatu's, I pretty much though I had a handle on the genera. Little did I know what a wonderful world of mystery and suspense that Bram Stoker opened up for me.

The story is told mostly third party though the papers, diaries, and phonograph recordings (on wax cylinders) of those people involve in a tale so bizarre that it almost defies belief. The general story line is that of a Count that plans to move to a more urban setting (from Borgo Pass to London) where there is a richer diet. There he finds succulent women; something he can sing his teeth in. Unfortunately for him a gang of ruffians (including a real-estate agent, asylum director, Texas cowboy and an Old Dutch abnormal psychologist) is out to detour his nocturnal munching. They think they have Drac on the run but with a wing and a prayer he is always one step ahead.

Of more value to the reader is the rich prose chosen by Stoker as he describes the morals and technology of the time. We have to come to grips with or decide if we can perform the rituals that are required to eliminate vampires verses the impropriety of opening graves and staking loved ones. The powers in the book differ from the movie versions in that they are more of persuasion and capabilities to manipulate the local weather. At one point the Dutch Dr. Van Helsing, is so overwhelmed by a beautiful vampire laying in the grave that he almost for gets why he is there and may become vamp chow.

All in all the story is more in the cunning chase. And the question as to will they succeed or will Dracula triumph. Remember "For the dead travel fast."

Dracula
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on May 16 2010
Format: Paperback
"Dracula" was not the first vampire novel, nor was it Bram Stoker's first book.

But after years of research, Stoker managed to craft the ultimate vampire novel, which has spawned countless movies, spinoffs, and books that follow the blueprint of the Transylvanian count. Eerie, horrifying and genuinely mysterious, "Dracula" is undoubtedly the most striking and unique vampire novel yet penned.

Real estate agent Jonathan Harker arrives in Transylvania, to arrange a London house sale to Count Dracula. But as the days go by, Harker witnesses increasingly horrific events, leading him to believe that Dracula is not actually human. His fiancee Mina arrives in Transylvania, and finds that he has been feverish. Meanwhile the count has vanished -- along with countless boxes filled with dirt.

And soon afterwards, strange things happen: a ship piloted by a dead man crashes on the shore, after a mysterious thing killed the crew. A lunatic talks about "Him" coming. And Mina's pal Lucy dies of mysterious blood loss, only to come back as an undead seductress. Dracula has arrived in England -- then the center of the Western world -- and intends to make it his own...

"Dracula" is the grandaddy of Lestat and other elegantly alluring bloodsuckers, but that isn't the sole reason why this novel is a classic. It's also incredibly atmospheric, and very well-written. Not only is it very freaky, in an ornate Victorian style, but it is also full of restrained, quiet horror and creepy eroticism. What's more, it's shaped the portrayal of vampires in movies and books, even to this day.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By "samarand" on April 26 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Dracula wasn't either the first or the best vampire story, but it was the first that was wildly popular. There are many reasons for its popularity, among other things because it was pretty racy for the time. Also, the vampire theme was and still is a very compelling and manifold subject. However, I suspect there is another reason for its popularity. Stories like "La morte amoureuse," by Théophile Gautier, and "Carmilla," by Joseph Sheridan LeFanu, preceded Dracula by many years, and, from the point of view of literary quality, they both leave Dracula eating dust, but few people have read them. The fact is, these are pretty ambiguous stories: good and evil are not separated by neat and precise borders. They are not merely scary, they are disturbing. On the other hand, Dracula is very straightforward and simplistic. On the one hand, you have Dracula, a totally evil force, on the other, the "brave men" and Mina, who represent the forces of civilization and "therefore," they are perfectly good. In this picture, Lucy and Renfield are the most interesting characters, because they are the only ones that stand in a grey area. The "message" of the story is that you can always defeat the forces of darkness, as long as you have the right technology and the right money, and as long as the powers of civilized life are on your side. This is simply not the way it works, however.
Most movie Draculas are more interesting than Stoker's Dracula. In the movies, correctly I think, they have generally tried to make Dracula more seductive, and sometimes even charming. In the book, Dracula is more like a rapist, and utterly disagreeable.
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