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Dream Children Hardcover – Jul 28 1998


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: WW Norton; American First edition (July 28 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393027406
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393027402
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 16.8 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)


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First Sentence
It was Bobs who broke the news to the three of them, to her mother, her grandmother, and to Catharine Cuffe: to the quorum, one might say. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is an awful book. I am an avid reader and I often read controversial books but this one is as close to pornography form the far side of the spectrum. As a bout the literary style, the best I can say is that it is written in correct English
I personally returned the book and asked for a refund
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By Judith Poch Armata on Oct. 29 2003
Format: Hardcover
I am not sure what is wrong with the other people who read this book who seem to think it is exceptionally good writing. At the end of the day the story is of a grown man who destroys a child's innocence, leads a former lesbian wife to suicide and adopts two additional children to molest later in life. It is sickening. For all the grand words used to describe the book, it is nothing but a new twist on pedophelia. By explaining it through the eyes of man consumed by it, the author tries to perhaps makes him more human and makes the subject more palatable. Rubbish. I threw the book in the trash in the Orlando airport and poured my drink on top of it. That was the only time I had any delight related to this book! It does not even deserve one star
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By A Customer on Aug. 4 2002
Format: Hardcover
I was about to read this novel, when I noticed a piece in the New York Times Week in Review reporting that the author, A.N. Wilson, had "'reluctantly' concluded that Israel no longer had a right to exist." The article discusses Wilson's support of a fellow writer who had referred to Israeli soldiers as "the Zionist SS" and who described American Jews who have settled on the West Bank as Nazis who should be shot. "'Many in this country and throughout the world would echo [these] views on the tragic events in the Middle East,'" the Times quoted Wilson as saying. I felt that A.N. Wilson's political opinions were important information for readers to be aware of. I am glad Mr. Wilson was so open about his views; I immediately discarded his book unread on learning of them.
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Format: Paperback
...into the mind and life of a pedophile. Told from the point of view of Oliver Gold, a seemingly mild-mannered, brilliant writer and philosopher, A. N. Wilson's book does just that -- and it is truly a scary place to visit.
Gold lives in a house of women -- all of whom consider themselves to be free-thinkers. It is the consequence of this self-image that they allow themselves to be taken in emotionally by their male lodger, to the extent that they are unable -- or unwilling -- to see the ongoing relationship he shares with Bobs, a precocious pre-teen girl, the daughter of one of the women in the house. A dark, well-written story with disturbing moral implications, Wilson's novel is one that will -- hopefully -- make most readers uncomfortable to the point that they will do some serious thinking and investigating on their own into the subject of child abuse in our society.
I don't think for a moment that Wilson has made his protagonist seem gentle and harmless, intelligent and ingratiating, in order to make him seem less evil, or to propose in any way whatsoever that this sort of behavior is acceptable -- he's done it in order for us to realize how insidiously a perpetrator such as Gold can 'hide in plain sight'. There are truly monsters such as this who live among us, preying on children. As disturbing as this novel is, maybe it will cause all of us to open our eyes a little wider, to be more watchful and vigilant in protecting those who look to us for care and love.
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