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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847677681
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847677686
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 1.9 x 21.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 299 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #776,621 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Allen Lucas on May 19 2010
Format: Hardcover
Having heard an interview on CBC Radio, I was intrigued by Daniel Pink's comments. Hearing the full interview on podcast, I was motivated to explore the book.

Motivation in the workplace is something that one may perceive as a manager's or supervisor's responsibility. Drive provides the insight for one to understand that perhaps some of the best motivation we have comes from within, intrinsic (Type I) rather than extrinsic (Type X). To lead a younger workforce, with different priorities than our parents, companies must embrace the concepts presented by Pink and forget that the carrot and stick approach will solve all woes.

The book is the right length to introduce the subject of motivation and provides a great list of further readings and references. Well worth reading from a business leader AND a worker.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 11 2010
Format: Hardcover
"And if the men should drive them hard one day, all the flock will die." -- Genesis 33:13

Dan Pink has done his usual fine work in Drive by:

1. Identifying the relevant scientific research
2. Turning the findings into brief, reader-friendly material
3. Simplifying the key points into a few principles to remember
4. Comparing and contrasting those points with what prevailing practices are in larger organizations

If you are already familiar with the literature of creative motivation, you won't find anything new here. If you don't read that literature, Mr. Pink will take you to where you should want to go with a minimum of time and effort on your part.

The key point is that people respond to more than money in getting their work done. And the more you need someone to use all their resources, the more money becomes a hurdle to success rather than an aid . . . by narrowing focus too much.

Here's a personal example that I remember well that shows the same point. As a poverty-stricken undergraduate, I never saw a psychology experiment that I didn't want to participate in . . . as long as it paid. One such experiment involved memorizing some nonsense material over a series of sessions. I could usually do it relatively quickly. One night my girl friend was in a big rush to go out, but I needed to get paid by the experimenters before I could afford to take her out. I decided I would try much harder than usual so I could get done faster and be on my way with the money. Wrong! I thought I was never going to finish that experiment. The harder I tried, the worse I did. The experimenter was obviously astonished by all the trouble I was having. I'm sure I messed up that set of results for some graduate student.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 16 2010
Format: Hardcover
I have read and reviewed all of Dan Pink's previous books and think that this is his most important, his most valuable thus far. As the subtitle correctly indicates, he focuses on "the surprising truth about what motivates us." The revelations he shares were generated by a five-year research project that involved thousands of test groups and individuals as well as dozens of research associates whom Pink duly acknowledges with obvious admiration as well as appreciation. "This is a book about motivation. I will show that much of what we believe about the subject just isn't so - and that the insights that [Harry] Harlow and [Edward] Deci began uncovering a few decades ago come much closer to the truth." Pink goes on assert that most organizations (regardless of nature and extent) formulate strategies for motivation based on faulty assumptions and then, however well-executed these strategies may be, fail to achieve their objectives. These organizations continue to pursue practices (e.g., shirt-term incentive plans and pay-for-performance schemes) "in the face of mounting evidence that such measures usually don't work and often do harm. Worse, these practices have infiltrated our schools, where we ply our future workforce with iPods, cash, and pizza coupons to `incentivize' them to learn. Something has gone wrong." Indeed, as Pink convincingly explains, something has been wrong, very wrong, for many years.

Drawing upon an abundance of research by several behavioral scientists, including Harlow and Deci, provides a multi-faceted, multi-dimensional explanation of "what motivates us," what really motivates us. He carefully organizes his material within three Parts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michael A. Robson on Oct. 31 2010
Format: Hardcover
I love it when friends, authors, thinkers, comedians, and scientists are able to cut to the heart of something we've all been thinking, but were never able to articulate: in Drive, Daniel H. Pink goes after our real or imagined relationship with money, and to what extent it actually motivates us to not just work harder, but be more creative and effective in our jobs.

Not only are his findings fascinating, they're so contradictory of traditional Economic models for human behaviour that he proposes a totally new paradigm. He calls it Drive 3.0. (Drive 1.0 being Biological, and 2.0 being Economic)

Since most of us (in the developed world) have the first two taken care of by about age 25, most offices and workplaces are filled with bored empty zombies, clacking keys and shoving paper around until they retire. Their problem is they bought into the Drive 2.0 model ('it's all about money, make more and you'll be happier')

Well, of course money makes some people happy right? Sure! When those people are running short of it!

Anyone in the US who makes less than about 30 thousand dollars annually will actually be ecstatic to get more money. They can be incentivized to work more and work harder on any job, you name it. But once they hit the 30 thousand mark, they start to slack off. Money is about survival, and 30 grand is enough for most people to survive. Once they start making more than that, it's time to stop paying, and start inspiring. And here's where the fun, cool, creative jobs are. Pink refers to this new motivator as Intrinsic motivation.

Wow. Sounds amazing right?
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