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Dubliners Paperback – May 1 1991


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Dover Publications; New edition edition (May 1 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0486268705
  • ISBN-13: 978-0486268705
  • Product Dimensions: 21 x 13.6 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 118 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #14,211 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Back Cover

Although James Joyce began these stories of Dublin life in 1904, when he was 22, and had completed them by the end of 1907, they remained unpublished until 1914—victims of Edwardian squeamishness. Their vivid, tightly focused observations of the life of Dublin's poorer classes, their unconventional themes, coarse language, and mention of actual people and places made publishers of the day reluctant to undertake sponsorship.
Today, however, the stories are admired for their intense and masterly dissection of "dear dirty Dublin," and for the economy and grace with which Joyce invested this youthful fiction. From "The Sisters," the first story, illuminating a young boy's initial encounter with death, through the final piece, "The Dead," considered a masterpiece of the form, these tales represent, as Joyce himself explained, a chapter in the moral history of Ireland that would give the Irish "one good look at themselves." But in the end the stories are not just about the Irish; they represent moments of revelation common to all people.
Now readers can enjoy all 15 stories in this inexpensive collection, which also functions as an excellent, accessible introduction to the work of one of the 20th century's most influential writers. Dubliners is reprinted here, complete and unabridged, from a standard edition.

About the Author

Sooner or later, most undergraduates encounter him, and some scholars devote their careers to his exuberantly eloquent prose. James Joyce (1882-1941) led the vanguard of 20th-century fiction, and his experimental use of language and stream-of-consciousness technique continue to captivate, intrigue, and influence modern readers and writers.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By alexander danielson on March 26 2001
Format: Paperback
Like in a gloomy church filled with a misty and humid atmosphere, you quietly look for heavenly light to lead your path. As you search for the light switch, feelings of uneasiness and discomfort fill your heart. With fear in every joint of your body, you nervously feel the whole universe will collapse in just a few moments. While feeling your way through the squeezing darkness, the ground starts to tremble from underneath your undecided feet. Earthquake! Yelling and screaming for your life, no one is around. As the shaky church tumbles to the ground, you hope to hold on anything with foundation to save you from going down. Lying six feet in the ground, your only hope is Superman. You continue to struggle with hope of one day finding that light switch. This little story is the feeling I got while reading The Dubliners. The tonality of the book was very depressing throughout. Joyce does a splendid job of letting the reader know the Dubliners and their way of life. Alcohol was excellent in portraying the tranquility of the people and their suppressed lives. Joyce also used a variety of experiences to clearly display the negative tone and outlook on life by the Dubliners. As to the hope of one day finding that light switch, Joyce always gives hope to the reader with his beautiful usage of the English language. And I am not afraid of saying beautiful in describing Joyce's artistic usage of words. For me, he literally paints in the mind a picture of his stories. Joyce's masterpiece of words was the light, hope, and Superman of The Dubliners. The flowery descriptions are what kept me reading. All in all, I thought the book was a fine piece of work that teaches great lessons on real life.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Broderick on March 22 2001
Format: Paperback
Life is a system of interactions: interactions with school, work, church, and essential to all of these are interactions with people. Humans are unique in that they are intensely individualistic yet in their last days they take a more communal perspective and define the success of their lives based on the relationships they had with others. Some understand this long before those last days, and because they know that relationships make a life what it is, they try to understand people. While actually getting out and meeting with people is the best way to learn about them, there is a saying that states something to the effect of "learning from others without making the same mistakes that they did" is another good way to learn. Now, I am not sure what mistakes James Joyce may have made in his life, but from his novel, Dubliners, I can tell that he was an avid observer of people and is worth lending an ear to. His words are capturing and tell the story of humanity at its most base and intimate level. Though I may interact with people everyday, and want more of this interaction in order to feel more alive, when I read Dubliners, I felt more human and more united with the persona around me than I ever had before. Joyce is a master of the English language, but if one looks only at his entertaining and piercing rhetoric, one is missing the point. Of course, Joyce's words compliment his work, but I think the real secret behind his success is his knowledge of human nature. In my opinion, Joyce lived a full life. From his writings it was evident that he knew people. He could read their every move, their questioning eyes, or even the organization of their rooms and make a story of it.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By brandon reynolds on March 21 2001
Format: Paperback
All days are the same, another day full of tests studying and work. I've finally come to accept the fact that there isn't enough time in the day to finish all of things I have to do. Rather than getting disturbed day after day you eventually shutdown and turn off your emotions, everything becomes routine and robotical. Never receiving satisfaction from knowing you are doing enough to actually accomplish anything. The lights of life start to dim and nothing is able to remind you that you are still a living, emotional entity. There is only one way to gain salvation once you start feeling like you are in that cold closed dark room with nothing except the incessant ticking of a clock to let you know that you are still alive. I pull out my favorite red, Swiss pocketknife. McGyver can use a knife like this 101 different ways to save his life. I can be McGyver. This knife can save my life, all I have to do is cut my hand until the viscous red life in my veins starts to warm the surface of my skin and brings that tingling sense which in turn jump starts the cockles of my heart and reminds me I'm living. Fortunately I've found a new instrument to replace this masochistic behavior. I just pull out my favorite book, Dubliners, by James Joyce. This book is a collection of emotionally tearing, seemingly unconnected scenes from individuals' lives. Each chapter introduces a new character that is in an inescapable, despair filled situation. The reader gets to taste the full spectrum of absurdly depressing stories. There are the failed romantic hopes of a young boy who works his hardest to please a girl who doesn't even seem to notice him.Read more ›
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