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Dungeons & Dragons Player's Handbook: Core Rulebook I Hardcover – Aug 1 2000


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast (Aug. 1 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786915501
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786915507
  • Product Dimensions: 27.4 x 21.3 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (400 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #60,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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By WithPalmInHand on Aug. 14 2000
Format: Hardcover
Simply stated, if you're reading this, you've probably sunk enough money into role-playing games to purchase a used car. If this is the case, buy this book. If this is not the case, you probably can save a few bucks by buying older books from EBay, just to see if you enjoy RPGs. This having been said, I will direct the rest of this review toward gamers who already own/play D&D.
First, the basics:
Did they change a lot of stuff? Yes. A lot of basic mechanics have changed, from ability scores to classes. Some of this is good(No more confusing fractional strength scores) and some bad(unbalanced racial bonus/penalties:Half-Orc +2 Str, -2 Int, -2 Cha). One of the biggest changes is the dropping of most support for game worlds outside of Greyhawk, with a promise to get around to some Forgotten Realms sometime next year.
Is it really better? Thus far, I've only read the book, and not played a game based on it. As with any gaming system, there are things I like and dislike. Before I actually play a game based on these rules, I will probably sit down with the intended party and discuss all of the changes with them. If they hate something, I won't use it. I know I'm dodging the question a bit here, but the bottom line is, I won't really know until I've experienced the game played.
So how do I justify a rating of four? A lot is based upon my optimism going forward in the next year. As the new books are released, I am hoping that all will be well and good in the world of D&D.
The good:
-The book physically is quite attractive. The artwork is beautiful and the cover very nice.
-Some clunky mechanics have been removed from the game.
-Better system for handling skills(finally!).
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By Jacki on Feb. 21 2011
Format: Hardcover
Though it came a few days later than expected, the book is in great condition exactly as I wanted it.
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By A Customer on Nov. 12 2003
Format: Hardcover
I wouldn't listen to anyone that claims the "new and improved" 3.5 is any bit "new and improved".
3.0 is truly the right blend of D&D tradition and sound game mechanics. 3.5 is a pile of garbage house-rules for actual D&D crafted by a new batch of "limited" designer minds.
This book is D&D 3rd edition, no other.
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By A Customer on Sept. 23 2003
Format: Hardcover
Woc has done it again. They have released another editon, and it is supearior. Edition 3.5 is very like third (Hence the .5), but realy cleans up the classes and makes things more balanced. This book is good, but the new Players Handbook 3.5 Edition just blows it out of the water. They tweaked all that needed tweeking, and left the good stuff there. Toss your third Edition and go buy 3.5!
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Format: Hardcover
This book for most people is the only book you will ever need for Dungeons & Dragons. While there are many more accesories expanding the game, This is the ancor, and the only book needed for a player. It includes all of the Races, Classes, Spells, Feats, and Items you need to make and run a Charactor.
The best art of this book is that not only does it list all the things you need to know, it explains in full detail how all things are related to each other. If read like a book, (front to back not just paging for specifics) It spells out what you need, need to do, and how to. You start with the abilities, go into races, classes, and then skills, and items. Finsihing with spells, and feats.
Over all, i would rae this 5, because of what it offers, and its necesity to the game it serves. i recomend you buy it, even if you dont buy it here.
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Format: Hardcover
D&D 3E is a massive improvement over previous editions in a number of ways ... D&D has finally embraced skills, a big plus; a lot of the arbitrary and annoying restrictions of previous editions have been eliminated; the whole thing has been streamlined greatly at a fundamental level (there is still a lot of rules grit - attacks of opportunity anyone? - but this has always been the case, and by using a much cleaner and less arbitrary basic system, the game is now more intuitive).
The problem with D&D 3e is that it requires a *lot* of work on the part of the gamemaster. This is not a ready-to-play game by any stretch, unlike WotC's Star Wars d20, say. You have to go to some lengths to create a campaign setting, and realistically you're going to have to throw some of those arbitrary restriction back in. Why? Because D&D 3e has some significant imbalances, and you're likely to be playing with one player who is going to be looking for rules loopholes to create an unbalanced character. A big culprit here is the multi-classing combined with the fact that many classes are front-loaded with a lot of cool abilities at first level, so it's not unusual to find characters with 3 or 4 classes so they can cherry-pick low-level abilities from each. This is not only aestetically displeasing and unbalancing, but makes it impossible to keep a coherent character vision. The prestige classes are a cool and interesting feature, but are for the most part egregiously broken and, in the words of a fellow-player, "pure munchkinism".
Another complaint of mine about the system is that characters are simply too hard to make distinctive; the only real tool you have is this problematic multi-classing, and that is at best a blunt instrument.
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