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Easter Parade


List Price: CDN$ 9.93
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Product Details

  • Actors: Fred Astaire, Judy Garland, Peter Lawford, Ann Margaret, Jules Munshin
  • Directors: Charles Walters
  • Writers: Sidney Sheldon, Frances Goodrich, Albert Hackett
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (US and Canada This DVD will probably NOT be viewable in other countries. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Canadian Home Video Rating : General Audience (G)
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Warner Bros. Home Video
  • Release Date: April 26 2011
  • Run Time: 107 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004GJYR50
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,243 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

Easter Parade (DVD)

Amazon.ca

Don Hewes (Fred Astaire) is devastated when his longtime dancing partner, Nadine Hale (Ann Miller), breaks up the team to set out on her own. Determined to prove that he can succeed without her, Astaire vows that he can pick any random chorus girl and make her a star. Fortunately for him, the chorus girl he picks happens to be one of the greatest entertainers of the 20th century, Judy Garland (playing Hannah Brown). Easter Parade turned out to be the first and only collaboration between the two screen legends. Garland made the 1948 film despite ongoing health problems then had to pull out of a planned follow-up, The Barkleys of Broadway (Ginger Rogers replaced her); Astaire had retired following Blue Skies in 1946 but was brought in for this film as an emergency replacement after Gene Kelly broke his ankle playing touch football. Fortunately, Easter Parade always feels like an Astaire film rather than a Kelly film, from its Pygmalion-esque plot (which helps explain the principals' 23-year age disparity) to its score of Irving Berlin standards (some new, some recycled from earlier films). The film capitalizes on the strengths of both stars, Astaire in dance solos, including "Drum Crazy" and "Steppin' Out with My Baby" (MGM's take on Astaire's earlier, persona-defining "Top Hat, White Tie, and Tails"), and Garland in vocal solos, including the torchy "Better Luck Next Time." The stars especially shine, however, when they perform together in their vaudeville numbers, most notably the persona-defying hobo routine "We're a Couple of Swells." Watch this classic every Easter. --David Horiuchi --This text refers to an alternate DVD edition.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley TOP 50 REVIEWER on April 10 2004
Format: VHS Tape
If I could design my own musical, it would come out looking and sounding a lot like Easter Parade. After all, my perfect musical would absolutely have to star Judy Garland, I would want the two best dancers of the world in it - Fred Astaire and Ann Miller, Irving Berlin would supply all of the music, I would pack as much singing and dancing as possible into it, and there would have to be a significant degree of comedy alongside a wonderful romantic plot. I would not, however, include Peter Lawford in my cast, although Lawford isn't too terribly irritating in Easter Parade (and even seems to stay sober throughout the whole film). Gene Kelly was supposed to star opposite Judy Garland here, but an injury prevented him from making the movie. I do not mean to slight Gene Kelly at all, but I just can't imagine anyone other than Fred Astaire, who came out of retirement to take Kelly's place, in the role of Don Hewes. There are only a handful of stars talented enough to share the spotlight equally with Judy Garland, and Astaire is definitely in that select group. His presence is felt immediately, as he sings, dances, and drums his way through the opening scenes, and never fades throughout the entire 104 minutes of the film.
Hewes is in love with his dance partner Nadine Hale (Ann Miller), so he is distraught when she tells him that she has signed a contract to star in her own show. Hewes seeks comfort at a local club, where he drowns his sorrows and swears that he can take any young lady and turn her into a magnificent dancer, even someone like Hannah Brown (Judy Garland), one of the club's chorus girls. The following morning, he regrets asking Hannah to be his new partner, but when she shows up saying she quit her job to accept his offer, he has little choice but to fulfill his promise to her.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Chris Aldridge on March 19 2003
Format: VHS Tape
...this movie was supposed to co-star Judy Garland with Gene Kelly and, believe it or not, Cyd Charisse!! The latter two names both had leg injuries which forced the studio to replace them both. It was one of those magical jells which historians still talk about today: Astaire, coaxed out of retirement because he swore he was too old (49 at the time) to be dancing on film, was the perfect mix of Pygmalion mentor/gentle soulmate to Ms. Garland's familiar variation on winsome earth-girl-who's-every-inch-as-pretty (but doesn't believe it) as her more glamorous counterparts. I also feel that the "Swells" hobo number has been revered to death; I'd rather talk about Astaire's stage extravaganza "Stepping Out," which has the distinction of him dancing with *three* gorgeous partners then wraps up with him tapping slow-motion in front of a regular-motion chourus. Or Judy Garland's torch solo "Better Luck Next Time;" or even Ann Miller's tapping exhibition (visually dazzling in black, grey, and yellow) to "Shakin' the Blues Away." The period costumes are A+ (suits and hats on men; hats and gowns on women!!), the Irving Berlin score is an embarassment of riches, and the Charles Walters direction is solid. Favorite line is Astaire saying to Garland: "Why didn't you tell me I was in love with you?"
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Andrew C. Miller TOP 500 REVIEWER on July 16 2014
Format: Blu-ray
EASTER PARADE [1948] [Blu-ray] [US Import] One Of M-G-M'S Brightest, Cheeriest Musicals! Plus The Uplifting Irvin Berlin Score Is First Rate!

Strolling along 5th Avenue or going with a couple of bums with A Couple of Swells. Judy Garland and Fred Astaire lead a parade of music [17 Irvin Berlin tunes and an Academy Award® winning adaption score arranged by Johnny Green and Roger Edens] and gotta-dance fun [including Fred Astaire's Drum Crazy] in this never-ending delight and co-starring Ann Miller [performing a knockout Shakin' the Blues Away] and Peter Lawford [gamely crooning "The Fella with the Umbrella"] with Judy garland. Don't let this colourful Easter parade pass you by!

FILM FACTS: The film won the 1948 Academy Award® for Best Original Music Score. The writers of the film also received the Writers Guild of America Award for Best Written American Musical. It was the most financially successful picture for both Judy Garland and Fred Astaire as well as the highest-grossing musical of the year.

Cast: Judy Garland, Fred Astaire, Peter Lawford, Ann Miller, Jules Munshin, Clinton Sundberg and Jimmy Bates

Director: Charles Walters

Producer: Arthur Freed

Screenplay: Albert Hackett, Frances Goodrich and Sidney Sheldon

Composers: Irving Berlin, Johnny Green and Roger Edens

Cinematography: Harry Stradling Sr.

Video Resolution: 1080p [Technicolor]

Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1

Audio: English: 1.0 DTS-HD Master Audio Mono, Spanish: 1.0 Dolby Digital Mono, Spanish: 1.0 Dolby Digital Mono, German: 1.0 Dolby Digital Mono and Portuguese: 1.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Elaine Campbell on July 17 2002
Format: VHS Tape
In this film we have talents galore at their very best. The Fred Astaire we meet is perhaps more mellow, but warmer, than the films he made when he was younger. The Judy Garland we meet has a natural vivaciousness which life hasn't yet at times lessened. I have always thought of her as more of a singer/entertainer than an actress, but in this movie she excels at both. She is a wonder, even though she smiles through sad and haunted eyes. And Peter Lawford really acts and sings in superior fashion; he is not just a handsome, English poseur. And three cheers for beautiful Ann Miller, smooth as silk when dancing with Astaire or solo.
The plot: Dancer loses his partner (who he is also in love with) as she goes it alone. When tipsy, he pulls Garland out of a line and claims he will make her a great star. Come to find out that for psychological reasons she doesn't even know her left foot from her right. In the end, she's great, and also in love with you know who. She has to throw a few tantrums before Astaire wakes up to his unacknowledged feelings for her as well.
The best here are the wonderful and bountiful musical numbers: "We're a Couple of Swells" perhaps being the heighth of musical artistry for Astaire and Garland.
One aside: When Jimmy Bates (the boy who follows Astaire around a toy store while Fred performs "Drum Crazy," finished the filming of his segment and was about to leave the studio, Fred was a sweetheart enough to present him with the gift of a bicycle. Jimmy grew up to be one of this country's greatest dancers (modern, ballet and tap) and became the head of a dance department at a Northern California university.
Another element of this perfect film is the stunning fashions. Too bad women don't wear those gorgeous hats anymore which so adorned their faces and garnished the style of an era. An era captured beautifully in this what-more-can-you-say-about-it movie.
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