Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
CDN$ 0.01
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Ships from the USA. Please allow 14-21 business days for delivery. This copy appears to be in nearly new condition. Free State Books. Never settle for less.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical School Guide to Healthy Eating Paperback – 2002


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 2002
CDN$ 4.90 CDN$ 0.01



Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Free Press (2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743223225
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743223225
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.7 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (68 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,411,272 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
WE EAT TO LIVE. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold on Feb. 29 2004
Format: Paperback
This book by Dr. Walter C. Willett is the second of two very good books on nutrition I am reviewing. The first was 'Nourishing Traditions'. Both works have fairly impressive documentation for their claims from scientific literature. I just wish they would agree on all major points. The irony of the disagreement is that both appear to be railing against the same establishment that is based on endorsing a diet heavy in empty carbohydrates and demonizing fats.
Dr. Willett differs from Ms. Fallon and co-authors in his recommending as small as possible an intake of animal fats from butter, eggs, and meat. The basis of their difference lies in the effect of dietary intake of cholesterol (in contrast to cholesterol manufactured by the body) and in the nutritional value gained from both animal proteins and fats. Dr. Willet's position, backed up by the authority of the Harvard School of Public Health seems more in accord with today's conventional wisdom. Oddly enough, Ms. Fallon's principle demon is another Harvard professor pictured as being in the pay of major American food processors.
The two authors agree on most other things, especially in endorsing whole grains, mono-unsaturated oils, and fish for their omega-3 fatty acids. They also agree on the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet. Dr. Willett goes further to clarify this issue by pointing out that it is not enough to concentrate on any regionally based diet. The Mediterranean diet happens to be healthy due to the conjunction of olive culture, seafood, and grape culture. Those Italians and Greeks just lucked out, I guess.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 3 2004
Format: Paperback
I had always thought that what you should and shouldn't eat was simply common sense until I read this book. The best chapters are the ones about good carbs/bad carbs, and good fats/bad fats. Dr. Willett explains that highly processed carbs such as white bread, white rice, pasta, instant oatmeal, and potatoes cause sharp spikes and then sharp drops in blood sugar. The sharp drops trick the brain into thinking you need to eat, so it sends out hunger signals despite the fact that there is plenty of food in the system. This can lead to overeating. Over time it can also lead to diabetes. Willett also explains the concept of glycemic load. Foods with a low glycemic load raise and drop your blood sugar slowly, so you feel full for longer and have more energy. I have switched to eating whole grain breads, old fashioned oatmeal, Uncle Ben's converted rice, and bran cereals, all of which have low glycemic loads. I used to always feel fatigued (even though I'm in my early 30s). Now my energy level has improved dramatically.
The author is opposed to low fat diets. Willett talks about a study in which participants who had diets high in unsaturated fats had significantly fewer heart attacks than participants on low fat diets. This is because unsaturated fats raise good cholesterol. I also found out how to recognize trans fats when I look through lists of ingredients. The author explains the importance of getting many different colors of fruits and vegetables per day. So, everyday I fry a medley of five or six different kinds of vegetables for dinner, and lunch the next day. This is easy to do if you buy frozen vegetables.
My one complaint is that the book did not mention high fructose corn syrup. This is a sweetener that is in many breads, yogurts, crackers, juices, and breakfast cereals.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mike K2Z on April 2 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm turning 40 next year so I purchased this book hoping to get into the best shape possible so that I may enjoy the next half of my life. I believe these recommendations will change the way I eat permanently as I did not know this but the many foods I have been eating since childhood have been putting my health at risk.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
I abhor diet books. I approached this book with great skepticism, yielding only to the consistently good reviews from reputable sources and, finally, the personal recommendation from a good and intelligent friend.
You may read the other reviews to see how glowing they are, how praiseworthy Dr. Willett's book and nutritional guidelines are--on the whole I agree with them all. I would like to point out his EXCELLENT work at demystifying the science of nutrition, why we get frequent and often contradictory advice from health experts and, most importantly, how to critically evaluate nutritional claims, emphasizing when they are solid enough to warrant a change in lifestyle. In an age where every news desk has its own Health & Nutrition correspondent, intent on bringing you the most up-to-date (but not necessarily best, as Willett puts it)information from the food front, being able to sort through the chaff and find the wheat is crucial. How much of a role does sample-size play in a study? What role does randomization play? Is it even possible to have a random sample for nutritional studies? For even the best, largest studies, what are the downsides to them? How can the results deceive us? And, most importantly, when should we take the studies seriously?
I teach Critical Thinking classes as part of my living, and these topics are all central to any CT curriculum. I have rarely seen a clearer, more accessible, and more relevant exposition of this topic. In fact, when I begin to plan my next courses, I will be contacting Dr. Willett for permission to use several of these chapters in my class. The content is invaluable!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback