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Electroweak Interactions: An Introduction to the Physics of Quarks and Leptons [Paperback]

Peter Renton
3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 128.95 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Book Description

Feb. 23 1990 0521366925 978-0521366922
This book describes the theory of electroweak interactions, starting from a level understandable to students with only a first degree in physics. This theory, the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg (GSW) model, unifies the weak and electromagnetic forces of nature and gives a detailed description of the interactions between quarks and leptons, the basic building blocks of matter. The various experimental tests of the model that have been made and that are planned are described in detail, with reference to the fact that all results obtained so far are in agreement with the model. The interactions of quarks by the strong force, the theory of quantum chromodynamics, are also discussed. The GSW model, together with quantum chromodynamics, constitute the so-called 'standard model'. Theories proposing further unification of the forces of nature are outlined. This is a rapidly moving subject, and this up-to-date book will be of great value to researchers and beginning graduate students in high energy physics.

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"...an extremely valuable compendium of standard-model results and is strongly recommended as a reference to active researchers and to students and teachers of high-energy physics at the graduate level." Physics Today

Book Description

A graduate-level description of how the theory of electroweak interactions, or so-called "Standard Model" unifies the weak and electromagnetic forces of nature in high energy physics.

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One of the main objectives of physics is to find out what, if any, are the basic constituents of matter and to understand the nature of the forces by which they interact. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most helpful customer reviews
3.0 out of 5 stars right stuff wrong way Oct. 25 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
I think Renton has written a fine book, but I dont think it's a good text. Perhaps it's just me, but look at SU(3) and SU(4) sections and try to derive the 3*3=8+1 (for su3) or 4*4=15+1 (for su4) from what he's written. It wasnt until i read the better part of georgi that I 'understood'...the other introductory parts suffer from the same problem (like calculating cross sections before the chapter on calculating the S-matrix). That being said I think that starting at chapter 5 he does an excellent job. I would recommend a knowledge of quantum field theory (just enough to calculate cross sections w/o loops) and a knowledge of semi-simple lie algebras in particle physics to appreciate this book. So in all, excellent where it's good, but poor pedagogy for a serious part of the text.
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Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  2 reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good introduction to all quantum mechanics May 19 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is not really suitable for use as a University course textbook on "Electroweak Interactions", although the treatment of W and Z particles is here, because the parts dealing with electroweak interactions are scattered loosely through the book in Sections 5.4, 6.3, 8.9 etc.
Where this book really shines is in it's global treatement of all quantum mechanics. I particularly like Chapter 2 (the building blocks of quantum field theory) which touches on topics as diverse as the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, group theory, classical electromagnetism, and resonance particles; and Chapter 10 (the standard model and beyond) which touches on grand unified theories, supersymmetry and superstrings. Another highlight is Section 9.3 which describes neutrino oscillations. This book contains information on all the major particles, all the major equations for spin 0, 1/2 & 1 particles, Feynman rules for interactions, quantum electrodynamics and quantum chromodynamics as well as the "electroweak" of the title.
I compared this book with 3 other good books on advanced quantum mechanics and this one was by far the most comprehensive.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars right stuff wrong way Oct. 25 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I think Renton has written a fine book, but I dont think it's a good text. Perhaps it's just me, but look at SU(3) and SU(4) sections and try to derive the 3*3=8+1 (for su3) or 4*4=15+1 (for su4) from what he's written. It wasnt until i read the better part of georgi that I 'understood'...the other introductory parts suffer from the same problem (like calculating cross sections before the chapter on calculating the S-matrix). That being said I think that starting at chapter 5 he does an excellent job. I would recommend a knowledge of quantum field theory (just enough to calculate cross sections w/o loops) and a knowledge of semi-simple lie algebras in particle physics to appreciate this book. So in all, excellent where it's good, but poor pedagogy for a serious part of the text.
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