CDN$ 147.68
  • List Price: CDN$ 158.95
  • You Save: CDN$ 11.27 (7%)
Usually ships within 1 to 4 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Elements of Cartography Hardcover – Mar 3 1995


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 147.68
CDN$ 123.63 CDN$ 5.55

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Frequently Bought Together

Customers buy this book with Getting to Know ArcGIS Desktop CDN$ 50.37

Elements of Cartography + Getting to Know ArcGIS Desktop
Price For Both: CDN$ 198.05

One of these items ships sooner than the other. Show details

  • This item: Elements of Cartography

    Usually ships within 1 to 4 months.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping. Details

  • Getting to Know ArcGIS Desktop

    In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping. Details


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 688 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 6 edition (March 3 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471555797
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471555797
  • Product Dimensions: 3 x 19 x 23.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #237,288 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Cartography is in the midst of a revolution in technology. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By A Customer on Aug. 6 2003
Format: Hardcover
The sixth edition of "Elements" was published in 1995, and reviewers familiar with the advances in cartographic technology would be familiar with the great upheaval the field was going through at that time. Work on a seventh edition of this seminal text is currently underway, which should bring the content of the book up to par with recent changes. The book remains an important source of information for both the novice and seasoned cartographer.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
This title is billed as the Sixth Edition, and reflects the coming and going of co-authors. It is too bad that the editor had so little influence.
Sections of this book that stick to their cartographic knitting are excellent. Historical information is very intersting. Basic explanations, such as the evolution of ellipsoids is very well done.
Some of the writing could have been extracted from a sophmore term paper, sprinkled with such inept phrases as "such as", "similarly", "however" and "in fact". Better editing could have reduced these distractions.
The most glaring deficiency is in the area of computer technology. Either this material has not been updated since some earlier edition, or the author(s) are very uncomfortable with that subject matter. As examples: "Most common procedures used by cartographers have been translated into software programs written in special computer languages such as FORTRAN and C."
"Today's well-rounded cartographer is routinely involved with these 'canned' (prewritten) mapping programs..."
"The professional cartographer should, therefor, have a working knowledge of at least one computer language." We are regaled with three pages of detailed obselescent material on computer structure, but only 23 lines of overview on current instrument technology. There is a whole chapter on fonts and lettering, but no algorithm for conversion from Lat-Long to UTM. The central meridians for the UTM zones are not provided, nor is the DoD lettering scheme.
One of the responsibilities of a text book is to arrange the subject matter in a structure where it flows logically and can be easily referenced. This book reads like a series of articles of varying quality published under one cover, with overlap resolution left as an exercise for the reader.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Hardcover
This title is billed as the Sixth Edition, and reflects the coming and going of co-authors. It is too bad that the editor had so little influence. Sections of this book that stick to their cartographic knitting are excellent. Historical information is very intersting. Basic explanations, such as the evolution of ellipsoids is very well done. Some of the writing is so bad it could have been extracted from a sophmore term paper, sprinkled with such inept phrases as "such as", "similarly", "however" and "in fact". The most glaring deficiency is in the area of computer technology. Either this material has not been updated since some earlier edition, or the author(s) are very uncomfortable with the subject matter. As examples: "Most common procedures used by cartographers have been translated into software programs written in special computer languages such as FORTRAN and C." "Today's well-rounded cartographer is routinely involved with these 'canned' (prewritten) mapping programs..." "The professionsal cartographer should, therefor, have a working knowledge of at least one computer language." We are regaled with three pages of detailed obselescent material on computer structure, but only 23 lines of overview on current instrument technology. There is a whole chapter on fonts and lettering, but no algorithm for conversion from Lat-Long to UTM. The central meridians for the UTM zones are not provided, nor is the DoD lettering scheme. One of the responsibilities of a text book is to arrange the subject matter in a structure where it can be easily referenced. This book reads like a series of articles of varying quality published under one cover, with overlap resolution left as an exercise for the reader.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
58 of 69 people found the following review helpful
This book is pricey and uneven. March 16 2000
By Peter G. Cook - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This title is billed as the Sixth Edition, and reflects the coming and going of co-authors. It is too bad that the editor had so little influence. Sections of this book that stick to their cartographic knitting are excellent. Historical information is very intersting. Basic explanations, such as the evolution of ellipsoids is very well done. Some of the writing is so bad it could have been extracted from a sophmore term paper, sprinkled with such inept phrases as "such as", "similarly", "however" and "in fact". The most glaring deficiency is in the area of computer technology. Either this material has not been updated since some earlier edition, or the author(s) are very uncomfortable with the subject matter. As examples: "Most common procedures used by cartographers have been translated into software programs written in special computer languages such as FORTRAN and C." "Today's well-rounded cartographer is routinely involved with these 'canned' (prewritten) mapping programs..." "The professionsal cartographer should, therefor, have a working knowledge of at least one computer language." We are regaled with three pages of detailed obselescent material on computer structure, but only 23 lines of overview on current instrument technology. There is a whole chapter on fonts and lettering, but no algorithm for conversion from Lat-Long to UTM. The central meridians for the UTM zones are not provided, nor is the DoD lettering scheme. One of the responsibilities of a text book is to arrange the subject matter in a structure where it can be easily referenced. This book reads like a series of articles of varying quality published under one cover, with overlap resolution left as an exercise for the reader.
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Still recognized as an important text Aug. 6 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The sixth edition of "Elements" was published in 1995, and reviewers familiar with the advances in cartographic technology would be familiar with the great upheaval the field was going through at that time. Work on a seventh edition of this seminal text is currently underway, which should bring the content of the book up to par with recent changes. The book remains an important source of information for both the novice and seasoned cartographer.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A Little Surprised... Aug. 24 2006
By L. Rich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I am currently reading/studying this book and have found it be a bit choppy and not very well written. For a book of this magnitude I would have expected that a outline of the book to be written in chapter one. This book is about cartography but no definition is given until chapter two (it is assumed in the intro and panels). I just expected more and am currently looking for a supplimentary book to this one.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A little outdated, but good overall review of the profession/subject as a while March 2 2014
By Brandi Kiehl - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A little old and outdated, but it did the job. It explained what my professor didn't. Good book for beginners or those that do not understand what cartography is. I kept the book. I found it to be too informative and valuable to sell.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Cartography - must have title June 25 2006
By Zorko Sostaric - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This book is very valuable source of information for anyone wanting to learn or refresh his knowledge of cartographic principles. Great variety of topics is covered in details and well illustrated so understanding of topics should not be too difficult to grasp.

It is a little bit weak on modern GIS systems section and cartographic capabilities of those. It is understandable since it is 10 years old now. It would be good to have more pictures in the full colour section.

This book is used as a reference book for lot of other materials and for a good reason.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback