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Elizabeth Karmel's Silicone-Coated Burger Press, 3/4-Pound Capacity


Price: CDN$ 21.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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  • From grilling expert, Elizabeth Karmel, a steakhouse burger press for making uniform, ideally shaped patties
  • Made from sturdy, silicone-coated plastic; easy-to-use design includes nonstick coating for quick release
  • Makes a "thumbprint" indentation in each patty to prevent burgers from rising at the center while cooking; 3/4-pound-burger capacity
  • Safe to clean in the dishwasher
  • Measures 5 by 5 by 5.3 inches

Frequently Bought Together

Elizabeth Karmel's Silicone-Coated Burger Press, 3/4-Pound Capacity + Norpro 3403 Square Wax Papers, 250-Piece
Price For Both: CDN$ 28.60



Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 12.7 x 12.7 x 13.5 cm ; 159 g
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Item model number: 60522
  • ASIN: B000JV7UGC
  • Date first available at Amazon.ca: Aug. 29 2010
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,342 in Home & Kitchen (See Top 100 in Home & Kitchen)
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Product Description

What makes this burger press a flat-out success?? For those who crave a great steakhouse burger meat or veggie - at home - the Grill Friends Steakhouse Burger Press makes the job easy. This is the first burger press made with a thumbprint indentation to assure even cooking, so burgers don't round-out while they cook. "The thumbprint is a little-known restaurant technique; the chef makes the patties and puts an indentation in the middle of the burger with his finger. As the burger cooks and the meat fibers expand, the hole is filled in and you have a perfectly flat, even burger, explains Grill Friends creator Elizabeth Karmel. This burger press makes the thumbprint for you, for better burgers every time.

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Most helpful customer reviews

By Colleen on Aug. 8 2013
Verified Purchase
All in all a good press. I made 24 burgers for a birthday party with it and it worked really well. If you're only making a few burgers at a time the meat doesn't stick too badly in the press, but if you're making more the patties do start to stick a little. I've had the most success by putting a square piece of wax paper in the bottom of the press for each patty. This makes it convenient for cooking/freezing also. The other feature that I really like about this press is the "thumbprint" feature. The patties always turn out really well. The only drawback with this press is the lid of the press isn't the easiest thing to clean. Still, its a great press.
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By RCL on Nov. 5 2012
Verified Purchase
Hey it is what it is and it works not much more to say. It is dishwasher safe but being no stick
that's really not an issue.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 21 reviews
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Not bad, particularly if you've tried the alternatives July 6 2008
By Sean P. Logue - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This has a lot of good things going for it.

The silicone coating is thick, resilient, and releases the hamburger patty (intact) with little effort. This is such a good idea that I'll very likely never buy another press that doesn't have a silicone lining. Those of you who have tried other presses, particularly the metal ones, and had the patty stick and fall apart after the press is opened probably know what I mean.

The ram allows very firm pressure for a tight, round patty.

The size is really good for a quarter-pound burger. I tried third-pound burgers with mine, but I think a larger diameter would be better for those as they came out thicker than I wanted them. It would be nice if they offered this in two sizes, with a larger diameter for heavier burgers. That way the heavier burgers could be made bigger (in diameter), without getting thicker.

The thumb print seems like a gimmick, but does work, particularly when using meat that has a lower fat percentage. I've found that the higher fat meats, like the traditional 80% meat/20% fat chuck, still tends to end up more like a meatball than the lower fat alternatives like 93%/7%, especially when using more meat. This is because the higher fat content meat shrinks more, and a small diameter with a thick middle will turn out looking more like a ball than a burger.

The little silicone cap, which comes off for cleaning, is nearly impossible for me to get back on. The tolerances are so close that it sometimes takes me longer to get that thing back on than to make the burgers themselves. Perhaps individual units vary a bit, but the one I have needs either a little larger cap, or a little narrower post. I tried drilling a small hole in the post in case air pressure was the problem, but it didn't help. Eventually I'll probably try sanding the post to reduce the tight fit, but I haven't done that yet.

I make the burgers by purchasing 2-3 pounds of 93%/7% ground chuck that is very cold (but not frozen). I use a digital kitchen scale to measure out four ounce balls of meat. I put them in the press one at a time, flatten them with my hand, then press down on the ram with all my weight. This makes crisp, round burgers that won't fall apart later when cooked. The soft silicone lining means you can rap it against a cutting board and it will pop out in one piece. (Hint: if yours is leaking around the edges, try using colder meat. Warmer meat is more likely to flow around the gaps and also to stick.)

As I make each patty, I put it on a foil lined baking sheet, thumb print side up. When I've finished all the patties, I put a sheet of wax paper over them and put them in the freezer for a few hours until they are hard. Then, I take them out, put them in foodsaver bags (ziplocks will work too), separating them with squares of wax paper cut from the sheet that was over them while they froze. Then the bags go into the freezer, and I can pull one or more patties out whenever I want to cook them.

To cook them, I put them on a hot, preheated cast iron grill pan, or outside on the grill, thumbprint up. After around 4-5 minutes (time will vary depending on the temperature of the pan or grill), juices will appear on the top. That means that the burger is now thawed all the way through, because as long as ice remains in the center, the top will stay cold and juice-free. At this point I usually carefully lift and turn the burger about a quarter turn and leave it for another minute for nice looking grill marks. Then, I flip it and leave it for about the same amount of time (including the quarter turn). I use an instant-read thermometer to check the center for doneness, around 160 degrees for well done. If it is close to 160, you can go ahead and take it off as the internal temp will rise around five more degrees after you take it off the grill. Just don't cut it for a few minutes or the juices will all run out due to the heat.

I put the buns on the grill for a short time to toast them on the side that faces the burger. It makes the bun stand up to the burger and condiments better, and lends a nice warm fresh taste to the whole thing. I also use field greens instead of standard lettuce for a more upscale taste and look, but other lettuces, like romaine, also work well.

Overall, I've found this to be a very cost-effective way to make my own, lower-fat burgers for much less money than buying the premade frozen versions.

Recommended, with a few reservations. It isn't perfect, but this is probably the best press currently on the market.

Sean P. Logue, 2008
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Best burger press to date...great product Feb. 3 2008
By Boston Bean - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I have over half dozen burger presses....plastic, aluminum, non-stick, etc.
This is the first one that the formed patty slides out of the base, so quickly and so easily. All of the non-stick presses that I have tried simply did not work....same for the plastic ones. The meat whether cold or at room temperature, would always stick. I'd have to pry the meat out of the press, destroying the patty shape in the process.
This Grill Friends Press is absolutely awesome. Burgers form easily, with little pressure, and are not overly compressed. The meat does not press out of the sides, as in other presses. After forming the patty, all you have to do is remove the top, by pulling up on the side of the upper body of the press. Don't pull by the red cap. I weigh the meat portions for uniformity of patties. The red cap, and the black parts of the press are made of plastic, while the red inner part of the base is made of silicone.
I recently disposed of all the old useless plastic hamburg presses that I have accumulated, over the years. Each one of them could have been a good
press if they only had that silicone lining in the base, as does the Grill Friends Steakhouse Burger Press.
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Nice but not perfect Aug. 8 2007
By --chris - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
Pluses
- Easy to clean (dishwasher safe)
- Burgers come out easily
- Makes "perfect" burgers

Minuses
- Plastic top comes off when "separating" after making a burger.
- Hard to pull apart after making a burger.

Overall a nice product and I'm very happy with it.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Not bad... but the search goes on June 7 2008
By Michael Holmes - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This press makes pretty good burgers as long as they are on the large size. Making thin patties is very difficult as they tend to fall apart when trying to get them out of the press. Also, after the first patty or so, the meat begins to stick in the press and one must turn the base over and pound to get the burger out. It is also important to centre your meat in the press and have it rolled in a uniform ball else the finished patty will be misshapen and an uneven thickness. I think the press is ok but my search will continue for something better.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great! Aug. 10 2008
By Molly in VA - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is a terrific product. I haven't had any problems with parts separating. I make 4 oz - 6oz burgers, but I'm not sure you could really make a 3/4 pounder. The thumbprint really works! The whole things washes nicely in the dishwasher. I've had it all summer and have made dozens of burgers and run it through many dishwasher cycles. I highly recommend it.