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Embedded FreeBSD Cookbook Paperback – Nov 26 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 233 pages
  • Publisher: Newnes; 1 edition (Nov. 26 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1589950046
  • ISBN-13: 978-1589950047
  • Product Dimensions: 22.3 x 19 x 1.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 440 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,080,369 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

Covers all the fundamentals, and provides sample code for most of the major software components of a typical embedded system.

From the Back Cover

*Provides numerous examples of system software with source code and debugging techniques that can provide starting points for your own designs
*Covers core operating system components, processes and process scheduling, system booting, virtual memory, device drivers, debugging, and much more
*All sample code is provided on the accompanying CD-ROM, along with other useful programming tools

Embedded systems software and hardware engineers will welcome this "cookbook" with recipes for writing embedded software using the popular FreeBSD operating system. Most of the technical information about FreeBSD is scattered and hard to find. The book, with its accompanying software, solves that problem as it walks the reader through portions of the kernel relevant to embedded systems programming. User-level code is provided to illustrate concepts discussed in the text. Debugging tips and techniques are also provided. All code for the examples in the text is also provided on the CD-ROM.

The FreeBSD operating system has become a popular OS choice for embedded systems due to its small size and the fact that it is free to users. However, detailed information on using FreeBSD is difficult to find. Author Paul Cevoli, an experienced embedded systems engineer, answers that need in this cookbook aimed at making life easier for engineers working with FreeBSD. Topics covered in the book include core operating system components, processes, process scheduling, virtual memory, device drivers and debugging, as these are the core features necessary for embedded system developers. The core software provided to the reader on the accompanying CD-ROM is written in C. Each chapter discusses basic components of FreeBSD, device drivers, Unix kernel, and C and GNU development tools, and provides the reader with the information needed to accomplish the stated task, along with sample source code.

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Customer Reviews

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By A Customer on April 18 2003
Format: Paperback
Amazing book, like no other. Most books include things like a 'Table of Contents' and organized chapters.. not these guys. They have learned to think outside the box and have created all new features never seen before in any other book, such as placing part of chapter 4 inside of chapter 2 and omitting chapter 1 completely. Amazing, Brilliant.
Yes, this is sarcasm. Be careful when ordering this book because, although they are pretty good writers, they are not very good at book binding.
But luckily, they do include a cdrom that contains the entire book in electronic format so you're not completely [lost].
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By A Customer on June 5 2003
Format: Paperback
the tomcat installation page , show the snapshot of the tomcat application server which is running in windows platform .
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Format: Paperback
Very clear. No waste of time with useless listings.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
A unique look inside the embedded development process Dec 13 2004
By Richard Bejtlich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
When I skimmed 'Embedded FreeBSD Cookbook' (EFC) in the bookstore, I was impressed by the amount of general FreeBSD information it contained. Now that I've bought and read it, I'm glad this book caught my eye. Although EFC is somewhat dated by its use of FreeBSD 4.4 (released Sep 01), I learned more about about FreeBSD internals. I also gained insights into what is needed to create an embedded appliance from the ground up.

EFC describes how the Measurement Computing company used FreeBSD 4.4 to create their Digital Input-Output (DIO) server appliance, built on a Network Engines 'Roadster' platform. The author explains the advantages of embedded systems and why it makes sense to construct them using open source software. He also defends the use of BSD-licensed software to build the DIO.

The best aspect of the book was its direct nature and breadth of coverage. EFC addresses many topics in a clear and concise manner, including processes, daemons, system calls, and library usage. I found this direct and efficient approach a good way to become familiar with subjects covered in much greater depth by books like McKusick and Neville-Neil's 'The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System.'

On the downside, for a reader on the eve of 2005, the book is dated in several respects. EFC's use of FreeBSD 4.x means some of its material no longer applies to FreeBSD 5.x. For example, 5.x uses DEVFS in place of manual device node creation. System source code (like the cdevsw structure in bus_private.h) is often much different. Some code, like ch 2's explanation of forking, works on 4.x but not 5.x. The use of the Java JDK version 1.1.8 really dates the book, as well. Finally, several typos change the meaning of parts of the text. For example, p. 30 appears to show 'gcc -00' (two zeroes) when I believe it should be 'gcc -O0' (capital O, zero) to disable compiler optimizations. Below on the same page, objdump should be passed the '--disassemble' or the '-d' switch, not '-disassemble'.

Overall, I still liked reading EFC. The book gave me plenty to consider, should I ever want to deploy an embedded appliance. Companies like St Bernard do use FreeBSD in their appliances, so perhaps an update by one of their developers would be in order?
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Contains Very Little Information Specific To Embedded FreeBSD March 3 2010
By Cory Walker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A complete waste of time and money. This book is misrepresented in what it claims to be about. It contains very little information specific to embedded FreeBSD.

The author should have written much more about minimizing the kernel, limiting memory usage, device driver development, and flash storage issues - because these are the topics that are the most relevent to an embedded system. The discussion about using Tomcat, JSP, and JNI to provide web access to an embedded device - while important - is severely lacking.

A good book about an embedded operating system will explore the problems and trade-offs that a systems developer will have to make. It would also discuss getting the OS to run on a single board computer - such as one of the devboards listed in the FreeBSD ARM project. This book does neither.
7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
Nothing to do with embedded BSD Jan. 3 2006
By B. Ben Ami - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I have several years of experience working on embedded Linux. I've bought this book, thinking it will help me better understand how to use BSD in an embedded env (like number of embedded linux books available). However, instead on focusing on the embedded side, this book simple describe how to wirte deamons, what's a system call etc. Read Steven's books if you need this kind of training.
5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Thinking outside the box April 18 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Amazing book, like no other. Most books include things like a 'Table of Contents' and organized chapters.. not these guys. They have learned to think outside the box and have created all new features never seen before in any other book, such as placing part of chapter 4 inside of chapter 2 and omitting chapter 1 completely. Amazing, Brilliant.
Yes, this is sarcasm. Be careful when ordering this book because, although they are pretty good writers, they are not very good at book binding.
But luckily, they do include a cdrom that contains the entire book in electronic format so you're not completely [lost].
3 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Great Book! a real cookbook Feb. 18 2003
By Gargamelic - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very clear. No waste of time with useless listings.


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