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Emperor: The Gods of War Hardcover – Mar 28 2006


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Press (March 28 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780385337670
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385337670
  • ASIN: 0385337671
  • Product Dimensions: 16.3 x 3.1 x 24.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 635 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #353,159 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Iggulden (Emporer: The Field of Swords) saves the best for last in the fourth and final novel of his well-received Emperor series, following the life of Julius Caesar. Caesar's story is a familiar one, but Iggulden writes it convincingly as a thriller: the novel begins in 49 B.C., when Caesar and his legions-fresh from their conquests in Gaul and Britain-cross the Rubicon and race toward Rome to confront his enemies. It ends five years later on the Ides of March with his assassination. Along the way, there's a civil war to be fought and won, a romantic encounter with the young Egyptian queen Cleopatra and a triumphant return to Rome where a cowed Senate names him Dictator for Life and Unconquered God. But Caesar's enemies-including his friend Marcus Brutus-plot his assassination for subverting the Republican government. Despite Caesar's larger-than-life historical reputation, Iggulden humanizes his hero and juxtaposes his bloodlust in battle and ruthless ambition in politics with an unexpected tenderness in his personal relations. Taking a rather large dose of literary license, Iggulden strays too far from the historical record, but his expert plotting, supple prose and fast-paced action will keep readers riveted until the end.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Iggulden concludes his magnificent four-part saga of Julius Caesar with a veritable bang. The many fans of the previous three volumes-- The Gates of Rome (2002), The Death of Kings (2003), and The Field of Swords (2005)--will not be disappointed by the cataclysmic final installment in this riveting epic. After tasting the fruits of victory on battlefields in Gaul and Britain, General Julius Caesar crosses the fabled Rubicon, initiating a civil war among rival Roman legions. Matching wits with cunning Roman dictator and military genius Pompey the Great, Caesar grapples for power both within the confines of the city of Rome and in all the far-flung corners of the empire. Realizing martial success alone is not enough to command the respect and loyalty of the cosmopolitan Romans, he becomes a consummate politician, exploiting his relationships with Marcus Brutus, Mark Antony, Octavian, and, of course, Cleopatra. Brimming with military, political, and romantic intrigue, this action-packed epic provides a breathtaking panorama of one of the most exciting episodes in the ancient world and breathes new life into a legendary historical figure. Margaret Flanagan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Again, what he makes interesting in this book of the series is his descriptions of the political strategies and battle strategies of the main characters. In this series he does not seem to get as much into the more personal aspects of their lives as he did in his series on the great Khans, but he still manages to keep you looking forward to the next page.
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By John P. Sully on June 9 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Book in great condition - however was not signed as advertised, but not a big concern
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By MDT on May 9 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Iggulden's writing is very entertaining and his weaving of history and fictionalized filling in the blanks are usually very well done. One problem.... check the historical notes at the back of the books. You'll find that, at times, he completely fabricates events and at other times he even deliberately re-writes history to suit his story line. It is a shame because several of these incidences were completely unnecessary. This makes the book fictional NOT historical.
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By Matt on July 31 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Epic novel right here
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4 of 9 people found the following review helpful By James Field on Oct. 15 2008
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
As historical fiction, this is pure comic book writing. The author has taken liberties with the facts to create a version of history that is one dimensional and trite. The bookish Brutus and unathletic Octavian both end up rippling with manly virility, duking it out in mortal combat. Huh? No one familiar with the real story can really be satisfied seeing things so hashed up. Never mind it is historically inaccurate and that neither of them were there in Egypt (Octavian was still a boy, for Pete's sake) it is not true to either of their characters, what character they have left after the author has reinvented them to fit his genre of writing. Other inaccuracies abound. For example, what's Julia still doing around after she died (her death was a factor in the final break between Caesar and Pompey)? The author glosses over these glaring inaccuracies in his historical note at the end, focusing instead on less glaring "literary licenses," implying thereby that he is actually writing historical fiction. If he is capable of writing an historical note at the end then he knows he is not really writing historical fiction and that there are far worse inaccuracies in his book than the ones he mentions. Despite all this he kept me reading, which means it was an entertaining read. Too bad it ultimately fails to satisfy on other grounds.
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