Start reading Empire of the Summer Moon on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle bookseven without a Kindle devicewith the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets, and computers.
Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History
 
See larger image
 

Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History [Kindle Edition]

S. C. Gwynne
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)

Print List Price: CDN$ 20.00
Kindle Price: CDN$ 16.99 includes free international wireless delivery via Amazon Whispernet
You Save: CDN$ 3.01 (15%)
Sold by: Simon & Schuster Canada, Inc.
This price was set by the publisher

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover CDN $22.57  
Paperback CDN $14.44  
Audio, CD, Audiobook, CD, Unabridged CDN $29.93  

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Description

Review

"S.G. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon is many things—a thrilling account of the Texas frontier in the nineteenth century, a vivid description of the Comanche nation, a fascinating portrait of Cynthia Ann Parker and her son, the mysterious, magnificent Quanah—but most of all it is a ripping good read. Gwynne writes history with a pounding pulse and a beating heart. In Empire of the Summer Moon he’s given us an epic frontier peopled with real men and women, living and dying and hoping and dreaming at the bloody edge of civilization. I couldn’t put it down."
--Jake Silverstein, Editor, Texas Monthly, and author of Nothing Happened and Then It Did

"Sam Gwynne is a master story-teller and a dogged reporter, and in this book he makes history come to life in a way that everyone -- not just students of the Texas myth -- will find irresistible. I couldn't put it down."
--Evan Smith, CEO and Editor in Chief, The Texas Tribune

"Man for man, the Comanches were the fiercest and most resourceful warriors in North America, and they held onto their domain with an almost otherworldly tenacity. In this sweeping work, S.C. Gwynne recreates the Comanche's lost world with gusto and style—and without sentimentality. After reading Empire of the Summer Moon, you'll never think about Texas, or the Great Plains, in quite the same way again."
--Hampton Sides, author of Blood and Thunder and Hellhound On His Trail

Product Description


In the tradition of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, a stunningly vivid historical account of the forty-year battle between Comanche Indians and white settlers for control of the American West, centering on Quanah, the greatest Comanche chief of them all.

S. C. Gwynne’s Empire of the Summer Moon spans two astonishing stories. The first traces the rise and fall of the Comanches, the most powerful Indian tribe in American history. The second entails one of the most remarkable narratives ever to come out of the Old West: the epic saga of the pioneer woman Cynthia Ann Parker and her mixed-blood son Quanah, who became the last and greatest chief of the Comanches.

Although readers may be more familiar with the tribal names Apache and Sioux, it was in fact the legendary fighting ability of the Comanches that determined just how and when the American West opened up. Comanche boys became adept bareback riders by age six; full Comanche braves were considered the best horsemen who ever rode. They were so masterful at war and so skillful with their arrows and lances that they stopped the northern drive of colonial Spain from Mexico and halted the French expansion westward from Louisiana. White settlers arriving in Texas from the eastern United States were surprised to find the frontier being rolled backward by Comanches incensed by the invasion of their tribal lands. So effective were the Comanches that they forced the creation of the Texas Rangers and account for the advent of the new weapon specifically designed to fight them: the six-gun.

The war with the Comanches lasted four decades, in effect holding up the development of the new American nation. Gwynne’s exhilarating account delivers a sweeping narrative that encompasses Spanish colonialism, the Civil War, the destruction of the buffalo herds, and the arrival of the railroads—a historical feast for anyone interested in how the United States came into being.

Against this backdrop Gwynne presents the compelling drama of Cynthia Ann Parker, a lovely nine-year-old girl with cornflower-blue eyes who was kidnapped by Comanches from the far Texas frontier in 1836. She grew to love her captors and became infamous as the "White Squaw" who refused to return until her tragic capture by Texas Rangers in 1860. More famous still was her son Quanah, a warrior who was never defeated and whose guerrilla wars in the Texas Panhandle made him a legend.

S. C. Gwynne’s account of these events is meticulously researched, intellectually provocative, and, above all, thrillingly told. Empire of the Summer Moon announces him as a major new writer of American history.

Product Details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 7784 KB
  • Print Length: 396 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1416591052
  • Publisher: Scribner (May 25 2010)
  • Sold by: Simon & Schuster Canada, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003KN3MDG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #16,159 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
4.4 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Misnamed but not misleading July 21 2010
By David Wineberg TOP 100 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Although Quanah Parker doesn't really come into his own until the last 40 pages, Empire of the Summer Moon is a fascinating compendium of everybody's sins - from the bloodthirsty hunter-gatherers to the incompetent armed forces and xenophobic, hypocritical settlers in between.

From time to time, we in the 21st century need to be reminded that buffalo roamed the endless plains, in herds seventy miles long and five miles wide, That tribes of natives lived off them and commanded huge tracts of land - as any self respecting hunter-gatherer from bald eagle to mountain lion must to survive. That everyone was brutal, thoughtless and cruel comes with the territory. The totality of this makes the book continually compelling.

What I liked best was that over the course of 250 pages, I got used to the idea of the endless plains (a few thousand Comanches unfathomably controlling more than 120 million acres), the criminally brutal weather, and constant movement of people, to fight and to survive. And then in one brief sentence, not highlighted or separated, Gwynne takes it all away again:

"Within a few years, barbed wire would stretch the length and breadth of the plains" (p. 276)

It put everything in perspective, and made the decline and fall of the Comanche bands all that more inevitable, necessary, and tragic.

Extraordinarily well documented, well written and well laid out, this is a fine read.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Native Americans June 9 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
If you are interested in a factual account of the native american during the late 1800's and early 1900's this book is for you.This book does not leave anything to your imagination, it tells what the Indians were like during that time and reasons for it, it is an "in your face" type of book.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating March 24 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
As a family historian I was drawn to the story of Cynthia Parker and her life with the Comanches and of course the fate of her son, Quanah. While I found the brutality appalling the story is very compelling. Quanah seems to have inherited an equal amount of both sides of his heritage. It is a sad story that he lost his mother as a young teenager. His love and respect for her struck a chord with me. Their story will stay me for a long time.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Nov. 29 2012
By Ryan
Format:Hardcover
One of the best non-fiction books about Native American histroy I've ever read. A great combination of History and an interesting story of a captured child.
Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended. Aug. 21 2010
Format:Hardcover
A fine work. Vivid, balanced, elegantly written, rife with interesting detail. Highly recommended.
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?

Popular Highlights

 (What's this?)
&quote;
Killing the Indians food was not just an accident of commerce; it was a deliberate political act. &quote;
Highlighted by 96 Kindle users
&quote;
(So many raids were made by moonlight that in Texas a full, bright spring or summer moon is still known as a Comanche Moon.) &quote;
Highlighted by 92 Kindle users
&quote;
But there was no ultimate good and evil: just actions and consequences; injuries and damages due. &quote;
Highlighted by 87 Kindle users

Look for similar items by category