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En attendant le vote des bêtes sauvages (French) Mass Market Paperback – Aug 14 2000


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Points (Seuil) (Aug. 14 2000)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 2020416379
  • ISBN-13: 978-2020416375
  • Product Dimensions: 17.5 x 10.9 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 222 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #366,668 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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En un quart de siècle, il n'a publié que trois romans. Pourtant, depuis Les Soleils des indépendances, son premier livre paru en 1975, Ahmadou Kourouma, né en 1927 en Côte d'Ivoire, est considéré comme un classique de la littérature africaine. En attendant le vote des bêtes sauvages fait le portrait d'un certain président Koyaga en qui il est facile de reconnaître bon nombre de dictateurs africains. Au cours de six veillées, il écoute ravi ses louanges chantées par son griot. Koyaga est trop imbu de lui-même pour s'apercevoir que ces éloges sont ambigus et dissimulent à peine des critiques féroces.

Mais le livre de Kourouma n'est pas un pamphlet politique. Il démonte avec subtilité les contradictions entre un discours technocratique souvent creux et le profond attachement aux croyances d'une Afrique plusieurs fois millénaire. Contradictions sensibles dans la langue étonnante du romancier qui s'emploie, non sans humour, à exprimer en français la logique et les structures de la culture malinké dont il est originaire. En attendant le vote des bêtes sauvages a obtenu le prix de Livre Inter 1999. --Gérard Meudal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Lors d'une cérémonie purificatoire en six veillées, toute l'histoire du général Koyaga, " président " de la République du Golfe, se dévoile. Au récit de cette vie, mené par le griot des chasseurs et son bouffon, s'adjoint l'histoire des proches du dictateur : sa mère, Nadjouma, qui tient ses pouvoirs d'une météorite et les fait partager à son fils, et le marabout au service du tyran, qui protège son maître des complots ourdis pour le renverser. Jouant sur les traditions, les mythes et les petits ancestrales liées à la magie, le despote a assis son pouvoir sur l'ensemble du pays et a bâti sa propre légende, mais avec les mains couvertes de sang... Conte fantastique, chronique historique et politique, ce roman est un portrait féroce et plein d'humour de l'Afrique d'aujourd'hui.

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Format: Paperback
This 1998 work by French-speaking Africa's premier novelist is a vehemently outspoken satire of despotic and corrupt African regimes from the 1960s to the 1990s. It's the life story of Koyaga, dictator and "founding father" of the fictitious West African state called the Republique du Golfe. Koyaga's history is recounted over the course of a "donsomana," a six-night storytelling by a hunters' bard, and the novel reflects this in its six-part form, interspersed with African asides and proverbs.
Koyaga himself is an interesting and contradictory character, though he remains rather underdeveloped as the author concentrates on his political rather than personal life. He's a military strongman who took power through innumerable assassinations and acts of brutality. But Koyaga isn't portrayed as evil--in fact he seems to have been beloved by his countrymen, at least those who weren't constantly trying to kill him. The reader is introduced to and immersed in the perspective of the African tyrant, one who after three decades in power has begun to believe his own self-serving propaganda.
The most interesting sections of "En Attendant le Vote" are those depicting Koyaga's visits to his fellow African dictators. Here the novelist gives us very thinly disguised versions of autocratic regimes of days gone by--Sekou Toure's Guinea, Felix Houpouet-Boigny's Cote d'Ivoire, Bokassa's Central African Empire, Mobutu's Zaire, and even the Morocco of King Hassan II. Each of these leaders lets Koyaga in on his own secrets to maintaining power, and gives him fatherly advice on preserving his own grip. We see otherwise kindly and respected statesmen who jail and torture their own friends, just to be sure of their loyalty.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Political Parable of Postcolonial Africa Jan. 30 2001
By Bruce Whitehouse - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This 1998 work by French-speaking Africa's premier novelist is a vehemently outspoken satire of despotic and corrupt African regimes from the 1960s to the 1990s. It's the life story of Koyaga, dictator and "founding father" of the fictitious West African state called the Republique du Golfe. Koyaga's history is recounted over the course of a "donsomana," a six-night storytelling by a hunters' bard, and the novel reflects this in its six-part form, interspersed with African asides and proverbs.
Koyaga himself is an interesting and contradictory character, though he remains rather underdeveloped as the author concentrates on his political rather than personal life. He's a military strongman who took power through innumerable assassinations and acts of brutality. But Koyaga isn't portrayed as evil--in fact he seems to have been beloved by his countrymen, at least those who weren't constantly trying to kill him. The reader is introduced to and immersed in the perspective of the African tyrant, one who after three decades in power has begun to believe his own self-serving propaganda.
The most interesting sections of "En Attendant le Vote" are those depicting Koyaga's visits to his fellow African dictators. Here the novelist gives us very thinly disguised versions of autocratic regimes of days gone by--Sekou Toure's Guinea, Felix Houpouet-Boigny's Cote d'Ivoire, Bokassa's Central African Empire, Mobutu's Zaire, and even the Morocco of King Hassan II. Each of these leaders lets Koyaga in on his own secrets to maintaining power, and gives him fatherly advice on preserving his own grip. We see otherwise kindly and respected statesmen who jail and torture their own friends, just to be sure of their loyalty. We see presidents who make no distinction between personal and public wealth; it's all theirs for the taking. And we see wily survivors who outwit countless threats to their rule and their lives, clinging to power in the face of tremendous opposition at home and abroad.
Kourouma's novel, in presenting these images, loses some of its narrative punch. The reader, if she's been reading the papers at all over the last decade, already knows how things are going to come out. We know that the 1990s will usher in a wave of "democratization" and "transparent government" (although, like the dictators, we are caught off-guard when it actually occurs in this novel). But along the way we get a rare insight into what it's like to be a dictator, to have an entire nation singing your praises while simultaneously trying to kill you.
At times I wondered why Kourouma didn't simply come out with a collection of historical and political essays about modern African governments. Then I realized that if he were to write about Houphouet-Boigny or King Hassan II the same way he writes of their fictionalized stand-ins, his book would likely be banned in those countries where he'd most want it to be read. "En Attendant le Vote" gets as close as it can to political expose without crossing that line into dangerous territory.


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