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End Of Faith Paperback – Sep 27 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: WW Norton; Reprint edition (Sept. 27 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393327655
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393327656
  • Product Dimensions: 21.1 x 14.1 x 2.2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Oliver TOP 500 REVIEWER on Dec 22 2006
Format: Paperback
At its heart, this book is about the difference between faith and reason. Faith is blind. It is not based on evidence or reason, and therefore offering evidence or reasons will not shake the faithful from their beliefs. Harris thinks that is very, very dangerous. It will come as no surprise to anyone that he began writing this book on September 12, 2001.

Harris argues that relying on faith instead of reason is a bad way to lead your life. It leads to all sorts of weird and dangerous beliefs, prevents important scientific discoveries, and stirs hatred between people who hold mutually inconsistent faith-based beliefs. Of course, people make mistakes when they rely on evidence and reason, but at least if we rely on reason and evidence, we are moving in the right direction and we are open to changing our minds when we are wrong. If our beliefs are based on faith, we are stuck forever.

This book will make religious people uncomfortable. Harris says exactly what he thinks, without making an attempt to spare the feelings of the religious. He does not, however, call anyone names or say anything in order to be mean or offensive. He simply states that facts as he sees them.

Some reviewers claim that Harris is "intolerant" or a "fundamentalist." They are wrong. Harris, unlike many religious leaders, fully supports the right to think, say and believe as you wish. He opposes any form of oppression. On other hand, Harris also reserves the right to think some beliefs are foolish. You probably do not respect the belief that Elvis is alive. Harris feels the same way about religious beliefs. He certainly would not want to see Elvis believers put in jail or denied rights, but he feels free to say that belief in Elvis is just plain wrong.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Stephen A. Haines HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on Feb. 6 2006
Format: Paperback
Mum always insisted; "Don't discuss politics or religion!" These days the two are too thoroughly intertwined to avoid discussing one without the other. Sam Harris thinks so, and is emphatic that we need to recognise that. He doesn't like religion - there are too many illogical and inconsistent expressions of it. He's particularly concerned about how religions manifest themselves in politics. In this challenging and provocative book, he urges us all to be aware about what the "faithful" learn about their gods, and how they express that learning. He finds the situation dangerous, threatening enough that immediate action is overdue to correct the peril we face. This cry of alarm must be heeded, and Harris has done a thorough job of explaining why we must act.
In the West, he notes how religious tolerance, after a long struggle to gain acceptance, poses a conundrum. Tolerance means acceptance, but the faithful in the three extensive monotheistic religions, preclude tolerance. "The Book", accepted if not admired universally, demands the diminution, if not the destruction of "heresy". He's particularly scathing of Islam's own "Book", the Qur'an in its insistence on rooting out infidels. Thus, there is no "border" to the Islamic world short of the planet itself. This, he argues, is a tangible threat. We've experienced one of its most diabolically conceived acts in the destruction of the Twin Towers. This, he argues, is but the first of a series of acts that will grow increasingly severe with the passage of time. Those in the West stressing that the suicide bombers are "fanatics" and "fundamentalists" are deluding themselves. It is clear, Harris says, that Islam "must find a way to revise itself".
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Fouad Boussetta on Oct. 27 2006
Format: Paperback
When someone claims something preposterous, unsupported by fact, out of wishful thinking and/or ignorance, we don't have to respect those claims. There is no reason religious faith should be an exception, argues the author. Faith is not worthy of respect in a conversation.

More importantly, Sam Harris makes the point that if we bend over backwards not to offend religious moderates, and the latter do the same not to offend religious fundamentalists (as you've noticed they inevitably do!), we're just freeing the way for the cancerous growth of fundamentalism, with the associated

suicide-bombings and other fun stuff.

This is an excellent book making the point that faith is positively harmful and could well spell the end of our world (think a bit about nuclear weapons in the hands of religious fanatics).

The only part that left me quizzed is the chapter about mysticism and meditation: Sam Harris may be onto something, but I really am at a loss figuring out what he's talking about.

Apart from that, the style of the author is crystal clear, brief, concise, admirably articulate.

Make sure you check out [...] it has very interesting print, audio, and video material.

And buy the book; and promote the cause!
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By James N. Rider on Oct. 15 2006
Format: Paperback
When I read this book about a year ago my first reaction was one of jealousy. This is a book I would have loved to have written. My second thought is that in a Bush era of right- wing Christian orthodoxy there is still nothing wrong with the US graduate schools if they can produce a scholar of this order of magnitude. They are still doing what they are supposed to do: producing graduates that can think and Mr. Harris is able to do so fluently. His is stepping into a distinguished tradition. His skepticism about religious belief in general is foreshadowed in Bertrand Russell's book Why I am not a Christian (a book that Harris makes reference to), and to the work of Karl Popper (The Poverty of Historicism) who demonstrated the strong links between Communism & Fascism with religious orthodoxy. While I cannot say that I agree in toto with everything that Mr. Harris has written, I can say that I admire his intellectual courage, and his ability to cast his arguments with reference to logic and reason
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