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Ender's Game: Battle School [Hardcover]

Christopher Yost , Pasqual Ferry
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 27.99
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Book Description

July 29 2009 Ender's Game Gn
There's a war coming. The same aliens who almost destroyed Earth once are coming back to get the whole job done this time. But we aren't going to just sit and die. The international military is taking our best and brightest to mold them into the finest military minds ever - and they're taking them young. 8-year-old Ender Wiggin is the best they've ever found. Can he save the Earth? Can he survive Battle School and the game that they will force him to play? The legendary sci-fi epic by New York Times Bestseller Orson Scott Card comes to comics, courtesy of hot writer Christopher Yost (X-Force) and superstar Pasqual Ferry! Collects Ender's Game: First Series #1-5.

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Ender's Game: Battle School + Ender's Shadow: Battle School + Ender's Shadow: Command School
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4.0 out of 5 stars Life at battle school May 16 2010
By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAME TOP 10 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Ender Wiggin is a very unusual boy -- he's a brilliant tactician, a genius, and a despised "third" in a future that only allows two children. He's also six years old.

And despite the fact that Orson Scott Card's sci-fi classic is about a little boy learning how to be a warrior, the first part of the comic book adaptation is a pretty solid graphic novel. "Ender's Game: Battle School" has plenty of zero-G action, tense confrontations between little boys and girls who act like hardened adults, and some weirdly shiny faces and hair.

After a fight with a gang of bullies, Ender Wiggin is approached by an army officer who wants him to join the elite Battleschool, where kid geniuses become soldiers -- basically because aliens are about to attack Earth AGAIN and may end up wiping out the human race. His brother Peter is too wild and cruel, and his beloved sister Valentine is too mild-mannered. Ender accepts, and quickly finds himself in a dog-eat-dog space school where he soon becomes loathed for the special treatment the teachers occasionally give him -- when they aren't observing his every move.

And it soon becomes obvious that Ender has a natural ability that exceeds that of most of the Battleschool recruits: he instinctively knows how to outmaneuver his opponents and protect himself in a fight, even if he annoys some of the "army" commanders who don't like being outshone. But an elaborate fantasy VR game has also revealed some unpleasant doubts in Ender's mind, as he tries to move through a fairy tale world filled with dangers....

"Ender's Game: Battle School" has a pretty daunting task in front of it -- it has to take a story filled with psychological games and children acting like adults, and somehow turn it into a good graphic novel.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.5 out of 5 stars  26 reviews
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fun to SEE Ender's Game, but . . . March 24 2011
By Braden E. Bost - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
On one hand this version doesn't change any facts or story elements (except making Ender's figure in the "Fantasy game" into a mouse . . . oh, and putting Salamander army at the top of the standings prior to Ender joining them, instead of at the middle . . . and changing the "buggers" to "Formics" exclusively . . . and making the guns during the game part of the suit, not something that can be holstered . . . I guess they did change a bit--but they didn't change Valentine into a beloved dog or anything seriously significant like that).

But on the other hand, this graphic novel moves through the narrative like a cheap TV-movie that tries to cover the first half of the book in 45 minutes. It chops out so much that I can't understand the reasoning. Were they on a time schedule in making it? Characters are introduced that are of great significance in the story, but only have time to really state their name and then they have to step to the side because the story's gotta keep moving. If you don't already know the story from the novel, you WILL be left scratching your head by the time you reach the end of this one (and it's pretty short). Its speed robs it of all depth, and its lack of an internal voice for Ender removes the most fascinating parts of the story--his heart and mind. We see Ender in the battle room with the Salamander army for just a couple brief frames, and we see nothing of his evaluation of Bonzo's tactics. In fact . . . I was watching for Bonzo's tactics, but the tight formations of toons weren't there, they looked just as scattered and formless as the other army. So what would there have been for Ender to analyze, other than deciding to break orders and use his weapon or not?

The art is okay. It's a bit lazy in some places as they clearly drew ONE picture for an entire setting, then just cut and pasted and zoomed for the additional frames needed, and that's annoying. It is neat, though, to see someone's vision of this world.

So that's what we're left with. A few images of half-way decent art depicting key scenes from the first half of Ender's Game. Don't come to this graphic novel and expect to get out of it what you would from reading the book. I read this thing and I fear what kinds of things Orson Scott Card is doing to his story to try to get it to the screen. This thing reads like it's a few explosions and feet of cleavage short of a Michael Bay movie. If you see it at a library, by all means take the time to sit down for 15 minutes to read it, but do not waste your money on this.
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Life at Battle School July 16 2009
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Ender Wiggin is a very unusual boy -- he's a brilliant tactician, a genius, and a despised "third" in a future that only allows two children. He's also six years old.

And despite the fact that Orson Scott Card's sci-fi classic is about a little boy learning how to be a warrior, the first part of the comic book adaptation is a pretty solid graphic novel. "Ender's Game: Battle School" has plenty of zero-G action, tense confrontations between little boys and girls who act like hardened adults, and some weirdly shiny faces and hair.

After a fight with a gang of bullies, Ender Wiggin is approached by an army officer who wants him to join the elite Battleschool, where kid geniuses become soldiers -- basically because aliens are about to attack Earth AGAIN and may end up wiping out the human race. His brother Peter is too wild and cruel, and his beloved sister Valentine is too mild-mannered. Ender accepts, and quickly finds himself in a dog-eat-dog space school where he soon becomes loathed for the special treatment the teachers occasionally give him -- when they aren't observing his every move.

And it soon becomes obvious that Ender has a natural ability that exceeds that of most of the Battleschool recruits: he instinctively knows how to outmaneuver his opponents and protect himself in a fight, even if he annoys some of the "army" commanders who don't like being outshone. But an elaborate fantasy VR game has also revealed some unpleasant doubts in Ender's mind, as he tries to move through a fairy tale world filled with dangers....

"Ender's Game: Battle School" has a pretty daunting task in front of it -- it has to take a story filled with psychological games and children acting like adults, and somehow turn it into a good graphic novel. Sure, aliens are about to invade the Earth, but the focus here is on the slow transformation of Ender from a very self-contained young boy into a tiny prepubescent adult.

But it actually does work rather well -- lots of punching (with accompanying blood splatters), zero-G acrobatics, and tense confrontations between assorted children, divided by "toons" and competition. It gets too slow in patches, but once Ender starts really showing his skills the story becomes more intense and focused. And it adds a chilling overtone that the adults are watching the whole thing and clinically observing what is going on.

Perhaps the biggest problem with the story is that we don't get much of a look inside Ender's thoughts, and mainly see how he feels through his fantasy-world explorations and the psychological evaluations. He does seem to come alive more at the end, when he struggles with his fears of becoming like his brother Peter, and realizes the true purpose of Battle School. And Valentine serves as a good supporting character, a girl who adores her brother and serves as his rock.

As for the art, it's a mixed bag. It's rather awkward at first, with giant heads and scrawny legs for everyone, and a stylized video-game sheen that makes everyone look like video game characters. However, the art becomes smoother as the series goes on, and the glimpses of talking snakes, green-skinned giants and magical mirrors in the imaginary realm are lovely.

"Ender's Game: Battle School" has some minor flaws, but is a surprisingly solid comic adaptation of the first part of Orson Scott Card's sci-fi classic. And Command School is yet to come.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Good - a review of Battle School (Ender's Game) Sept. 20 2010
By PeaTee - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Excellent rendition.

Having read "Ender's Game" in it's full glory I found myself more than a little hesitant to approach the graphic novel. I don't know about you, but frequently I've found that the graphic versions of popular works do adequately with the artwork, but entirely miss the tone of the originals. In this case I was afraid the the tone would be childish and the dialog boxy.

Surprisingly, that wasn't the case. "Battle School" was serious and carried the sense of intrigue and adventure/danger that Card put in the original. And I was entirely drawn into the story again.

Now the artwork, I must say, took some getting used to. The stylized shadowing I found a little odd, but soon I found that I was making the transition and really got into the dark backgrounds and striking images. (The inside artwork, by the way, doesn't look like the coverart. It's much better. And much darker in tone.)

All-in-all I really enjoyed re-reading Andrew's story.

Pam T~
mom/blogger
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good read Feb. 4 2011
By laura157 - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The book was good. Realtively close to the book. If you haven't read the book, the comic could be a bit hard to follow. All-in-all, as a Card fan, I enjoyed it.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable Aug. 10 2009
By MindCreations - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I am a big fan of the Ender's Game novel by Orson Scott Card so I was very interested when I discovered they were going to do a comic adaptation. I just received my copy in the mail and couldn't put it down, it was great! Illustrations are very interesting and it's cool to see someone else visualize the story. I hope they continue with this series and come out with more issues. I recommend!
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