Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Tell the Publisher!
I'd like to read this book on Kindle

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

English Pronunciation in Use [Paperback]

Mark Hancock
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 33.95
Price: CDN$ 31.67 & FREE Shipping. Details
You Save: CDN$ 2.28 (7%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Tuesday, April 22? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback CDN $31.67  
Audio, CD, Abridged, Audiobook CDN $54.82  
There is a newer edition of this item:
English Pronunciation in Use Intermediate with Answers English Pronunciation in Use Intermediate with Answers
Currently unavailable

Book Description

Sept. 29 2003 0521001854 978-0521001854
The best-selling English Pronunciation in Use is a comprehensive reference and practice title suitable for self-study or classroom work. Sixty easy-to-use units cover all aspects of pronunciation, including individual sounds, word stress, connected speech and intonation. An additional reference section offers a glossary of specialized terms, help with the pronunciation of numbers and geographical names and fun exercises on phonemic symbols and minimal pairs. Versions of this title with audio CDs, and a CD-ROM for additional interactive practice, are available to purchase separately.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Book Description

Sixty easy-to-use units cover all aspects of pronunciation, including individual sounds, word stress, connected speech and intonation. An additional reference section offers a glossary of specialized terms, help with the pronunciation of numbers and geographical names and fun exercises on phonemic symbols and minimal pairs. Versions of this title with audio CDs, and a CD-ROM for additional interactive practice, are available to purchase separately.

Sell a Digital Version of This Book in the Kindle Store

If you are a publisher or author and hold the digital rights to a book, you can sell a digital version of it in our Kindle Store. Learn more

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Why isn't this in the bookstore? April 27 2005
Format:Paperback
I don't know why so many bookstores carry Grammar in Use and Vocabulary in Use but not Pronunciation in Use, since it's just as good or better. And I would consider pronunciation more important than grammar or vocabulary.
There's a lot of fun included with the instruction. Try this: "Where are the pears?" "Bears?!!! Did you say bears?" "No, pears. You know, fruit!" "Oh, I see. Pears with a P! They're in the pack." "What? In the back of the truck?" "No, in the pack. You know, with a P" "Oh, I see. Pack with a P! Would you like one?" "No, I'll have a peach, please." "A beach?" Or this: "There was a young waiter named Dwight, Who didn't like being polite. If you asked him for food, He was terrible rude, and invited you out for a fight."
From the author about minimum pairs: "The units in Section A are not presented as minimal pairs. Vowels are paired according to their spelling, not their potential for being confused with one another. Consonants are paired mainly where they share the same place of articulation. The units were not organized as minimal pairs for two reasons: - Any sound can form a minimal pair with a number of other sounds, not just one. Organising units according to minimal pairs would therefore lead to a huge number of units and a lot of duplication. - Many minimal pairs will be redundant for any given learner, so learners need to be selective. Potentially confusing minimal pairs are gathered together in Section D4, Sound Pairs. Learners are encouraged to select from these according to their own needs."
Southern British accent. The appendix includes a list of useful and dispensable units for 26 languages
For extensive minimum pair work, see Pronunciation Contrasts in English, by Don and Alleen Nilsen, Waveland Press.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 5.0 out of 5 stars  1 review
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why isn't this in the bookstore? April 27 2005
By Shu Ping - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I don't know why so many bookstores carry Grammar in Use and Vocabulary in Use but not Pronunciation in Use, since it's just as good or better. And I would consider pronunciation more important than grammar or vocabulary.
There's a lot of fun included with the instruction. Try this: "Where are the pears?" "Bears?!!! Did you say bears?" "No, pears. You know, fruit!" "Oh, I see. Pears with a P! They're in the pack." "What? In the back of the truck?" "No, in the pack. You know, with a P" "Oh, I see. Pack with a P! Would you like one?" "No, I'll have a peach, please." "A beach?" Or this: "There was a young waiter named Dwight, Who didn't like being polite. If you asked him for food, He was terrible rude, and invited you out for a fight."
From the author about minimum pairs: "The units in Section A are not presented as minimal pairs. Vowels are paired according to their spelling, not their potential for being confused with one another. Consonants are paired mainly where they share the same place of articulation. The units were not organized as minimal pairs for two reasons: - Any sound can form a minimal pair with a number of other sounds, not just one. Organising units according to minimal pairs would therefore lead to a huge number of units and a lot of duplication. - Many minimal pairs will be redundant for any given learner, so learners need to be selective. Potentially confusing minimal pairs are gathered together in Section D4, Sound Pairs. Learners are encouraged to select from these according to their own needs."
Southern British accent. The appendix includes a list of useful and dispensable units for 26 languages
For extensive minimum pair work, see Pronunciation Contrasts in English, by Don and Alleen Nilsen, Waveland Press.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xa985742c)

Look for similar items by category


Feedback