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Epic Encounters: Culture, Media, and U.S. Interests in the Middle East, 1945-2000 Paperback – Oct 28 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 373 pages
  • Publisher: University of California Press (Oct. 28 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0520228103
  • ISBN-13: 978-0520228108
  • Product Dimensions: 22.8 x 15.3 x 2.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 599 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,046,326 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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When Cecil B. DeMille's The Ten Commandments opened in New York in November 1956, the critical consensus was that the director had created a middle-brow, melodramatic, and highly suspect account of the biblical story of Moses. Read the first page
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McAlister has succeeded in writing a multi-faceted description of the uniquely American view of the Middle East. This book offers unemotional and impartial perspectives on the subject.
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Format: Paperback
An incredibly good book. McAlister dissects and analyzes the representations of the Middle East in various media -- movies, news, plays, books, etc. -- and their relationships to the projection of US global power and the shaping of US cultural identity since the end of World War II. As she puts it, her goal is to address the absence of culture from discussions of the history of US imperialism, the absence of empire from discussions of US culture, and the absence of the US from discussions of postcolonial imperialism.
Among her subjects, all of which she treats deftly and with attentive detail, are: Amiri Baraka's "A Black Mass," the Israeli military raid on Entebbe, the 1977 John Frankenheimer movie "Black Friday," the tour of King Tutankhamen's artifacts through the United States during 1977-1978, Hal Lindsey's "The Late Great Planet Earth," the rise of the Moral Majority, the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-1980 and its obsessive coverage in the US media, the prevalence of military revenge movies in the 1980s like "Navy Seals" and "Delta Force," Betty Mahmoody's book "Not without My Daughter," and the Gulf War.
I found particularly compelling her discussion of 1950s biblical epics, such as "Ben-Hur" and "The Ten Commandments." The recent controversy over "The Passion of the Christ" is put into definite context when you see how "The Ten Commandments" was received (and what purposes it served) when it was released in 1956.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Excellent exploration of cultural and social identity March 17 2004
By fml66 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
An incredibly good book. McAlister dissects and analyzes the representations of the Middle East in various media -- movies, news, plays, books, etc. -- and their relationships to the projection of US global power and the shaping of US cultural identity since the end of World War II. As she puts it, her goal is to address the absence of culture from discussions of the history of US imperialism, the absence of empire from discussions of US culture, and the absence of the US from discussions of postcolonial imperialism.
Among her subjects, all of which she treats deftly and with attentive detail, are: Amiri Baraka's "A Black Mass," the Israeli military raid on Entebbe, the 1977 John Frankenheimer movie "Black Friday," the tour of King Tutankhamen's artifacts through the United States during 1977-1978, Hal Lindsey's "The Late Great Planet Earth," the rise of the Moral Majority, the Iran hostage crisis of 1979-1980 and its obsessive coverage in the US media, the prevalence of military revenge movies in the 1980s like "Navy Seals" and "Delta Force," Betty Mahmoody's book "Not without My Daughter," and the Gulf War.
I found particularly compelling her discussion of 1950s biblical epics, such as "Ben-Hur" and "The Ten Commandments." The recent controversy over "The Passion of the Christ" is put into definite context when you see how "The Ten Commandments" was received (and what purposes it served) when it was released in 1956.
A look into American Politics through literature and popular thought... Dec 16 2008
By ZMC - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I chose this book to pair it with Natasha Zaretsky's book "No Way Home" for my final paper and it helped me to make the connection between how American Foriegn Policy is formed by way of the media and the American public interest in the Middle East Region. To learn more about how American policies are shaped regarding the Middle East region, I suggest that you read this book.

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