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Erin's Daughters in America: Irish Immigrant Women in the Nineteenth Century Paperback – Jan 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins Univ Pr (January 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801828724
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801828720
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.2 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,447,125 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

The most sensitive treatment of Irish culture... [and] the most complete history we have of the Irish female experience. Labor History A vision of women with their own economic aspirations, actively engaged in the climb towards financial security. Women's Review of Books

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Nothing thrives in Ireland, but the celibate. Read the first page
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Although at first glance Diner's exhaustive study appears to be fraught with the political correctness and feminist biases that plague so many American academics, in reality _Erin's Daughters_ portrays the story of a gallant group that was able to overcome barriers of poverty, ignorance, and disease to succeed in a New World. The Irish women received no help from the government, from existing charities, or from the Catholic Church, but they were still able to reach the promised land of middle-class America due to their focus on economic goals. The women of Ireland carried their cultural values to America with them, playing a key role in the development of the greatest nation on earth. In order to understand this role, I urge you to read this book.
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By A Customer on Feb. 21 2001
The second half of the book is clearly superior to the first half. The lack of hard data from prior to and immediately after the Famine seems to lead the author to some curious and questionable conclusions regarding the economic motivation of the Irish women in America. She repeatedly attributes late marriage and spinsterhood to the "traditional" cultural separation of Irish women and men along with the general lack of character of the Irish male. She fails to examine the profound impact of the Famine on women--watching their families and friends starve to death along with forced immigration--and their determination to prevent this from happening again. I found her theories rather determindly sexist.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 7 reviews
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
A worthwhile addition to anyone's Irish library Jan. 28 2001
By Emmet Christoir O'Tuathaigh - Published on Amazon.com
Although at first glance Diner's exhaustive study appears to be fraught with the political correctness and feminist biases that plague so many American academics, in reality _Erin's Daughters_ portrays the story of a gallant group that was able to overcome barriers of poverty, ignorance, and disease to succeed in a New World. The Irish women received no help from the government, from existing charities, or from the Catholic Church, but they were still able to reach the promised land of middle-class America due to their focus on economic goals. The women of Ireland carried their cultural values to America with them, playing a key role in the development of the greatest nation on earth. In order to understand this role, I urge you to read this book.
18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
Questionable scholarship Feb. 21 2001
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
The second half of the book is clearly superior to the first half. The lack of hard data from prior to and immediately after the Famine seems to lead the author to some curious and questionable conclusions regarding the economic motivation of the Irish women in America. She repeatedly attributes late marriage and spinsterhood to the "traditional" cultural separation of Irish women and men along with the general lack of character of the Irish male. She fails to examine the profound impact of the Famine on women--watching their families and friends starve to death along with forced immigration--and their determination to prevent this from happening again. I found her theories rather determindly sexist.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Wonderful!!! Jan. 11 2012
By Irish - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I loved this book. If you are born from Irish immigrant lineage, it will explain a lot of your family history and why the maternal Irish side of the family had such dominance. The book also explains the love and solidarity of many large Irish families..As my County Sligo born grandmother used to say of the six siblings who immingrated to the NYC area in the early 1900's, "When one was in trouble, we were all in trouble!!"
Excellent resource April 26 2014
By Nancy Glidden Coffey - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is fascinating, well researched book on Irish immigrant women in the 19th century. It is a very well documented study that sheds light on working class women in the 19th century.
Erin's Daughters in america. Aug. 22 2013
By larry mulkerin - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
In some ways, the book seems to present conflicting views. Women followed Catholic norms. That made them nominally obedient to husbands to the extent that they would serve men a hot meal and accept the warm leftovers. That sounds a lot like an Afghan village today, where women are reduced to eating scraps and becoming too anemic to safely bear the huge number of children that their circumstances demand. It seems that Irish women were able to carve out positions for themselves, while the men became involved in politics. It has been interesting to look at the women in my family, including some alcoholics, and better understand them.The Ayatollah's Suitcase


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