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Escape from Reason Paperback – Dec 26 2006


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 125 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Books (Dec 26 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830834052
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830834051
  • Product Dimensions: 17.9 x 10.9 x 1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 68 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #80,880 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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This is a crash course on the development of Western culture and Christian history... Where is has come from and where it is now. A quick but potent read.
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Format: Paperback
Escape from Reason. Francis A. Schaeffer. InterVarsity Press, 1974. 96pp. ISBN 0-87784-538-7.

Francis Schaeffer has been widely recognized as one of the twentieth century’s greatest Christian apologists. In his book Escape from Reason, Schaeffer proposes to help the reader to interact, on a more meaningful level, with the current culture. Why? “We must realize that we are facing a rapidly changing historical situation, and if we are going to talk to people about the gospel we need to know what is the present ebb and flow of thought-forms. Unless we do this the unchangeable principles of Christianity will fall on deaf ears. And if we are going to reach the intellectuals and the workers, both groups right outside our middle-class churches, then we shall need to do a great deal of heart-searching as to how we may speak what is eternal into a changing historical situation.” In order to help the reader to properly understand his current cultural situation, Schaeffer proposes to explain why people think the way they do today, and how we got to this point. Unless we understand the cause, we will be unable to know the effect fully. Schaeffer proposes, as a starting point, that the entire contemporary situation finds its starting place in a number of doctrines that he claims were proposed by Thomas Aquinas, namely: a distinction between nature and grace, and a partial fall of humanity by which humans retained some form of autonomy from their creator. “What is wrong? Again, it goes back to Thomas Aquinas’s insufficient view of the Fall which gives certain things an autonomous structure. When nature is made autonomous it soon ends up by devouring God, grace, freedom and eventually man.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore on Sept. 10 2001
Format: Paperback
First, I have to express appreciation for Schaeffer. When I was in high school, I read through all of his books with great interest and avidity. He (along with C. S. Lewis) was a great example to me that you could be a Christian and still have a brain. I thought. Unfortunately, his books led to actually read the individuals he discussed. I went on to attend Yale University and the University of Chicago, studying theology and philosophy at both places. At Yale I met several Christian grad students who, like me, initially became interested in philosophy through reading Schaeffer. Every single one of us was grateful to Schaeffer. Every single one of us agreed: Schaeffer probably never read any of the people he discusses.
If you have just a little background in philosophy or the history of theology, and you look carefully through the footnotes of any of Schaeffer's books, it becomes fairly obvious that his reading was restricted almost entirely to secondary sources. He didn't read Aquinas so much as books about Aquinas. He seems to have been especially indebted to books by Dutch Reformed scholars. Most of his discussions of the great figures in the history of the church are travesties of their actual thought.
An example: Kierkegaard. Most of my graduate work both at Yale and Chicago was on Kierkegaard. Kierkegaard is a widely misunderstood scholar, but virtually everyone who has studied his work at any length will acknowledge that he was not a theological innovator, that he in no sense was trying to undermine Christian faith, and that he was utterly orthodox in his thought. It is impossible to find a single orthodox Christian doctrine that Kierkegaard attacks. In no sense is Kierkegaard an opponent of Christianity.
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By A Customer on Jan. 8 2001
Format: Paperback
Schaeffer's understandings of Kierkegaard and Barth are right on the money. His "rationalism" (i.e. belief in a rational God Whose Logos became incarnate in Jesus Christ) is in fact the only proper and possible harmonization of Christianity and reason. Neither one can last long without the other.

If God isn't "bound" by "human" logic and if the Bible can contain genuine paradoxes (a la Barth), then why do we bother defending the quaint and outmoded doctrine that the Bible is free of contradictions? Or do those who damn Schaeffer with faint praise wish to dispense with that doctrine too?

That there are still some readers who think Barth was "orthodox" proves only that Schaeffer's book is just as timely now as it was early in the twentieth century.
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Format: Paperback
This is a rather small book. Including the index, it has only 96 pages. But the contents of 'Escape From Reason' delivered on its claim as a penetrating analysis of trends in modern thought.
Francis A. Schaeffer had the insight to see into the near future by analyzing popular thought and showing that by bringing them to their logical conclusions, they usher in an era of chaos and moral irresponsibility. He demonstrated how the escapism of modernism and post-modernism only leads to absurdity and madness. The only way Schaeffer saw that anyone can transcend the absurd is the belief in a personal God who loves, expressing this love in God's Son Jesus. Good advice from a legendary saint.
I recommend this book to the student of philosophy, history, apologetics, and any Christian who wants to see a clear and well thought out discourse of Christian thought.
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