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Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind Soundtrack


Price: CDN$ 36.95
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 23 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • Run Time: 108 minutes
  • ASIN: B0001IXU1W
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #60,146 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Theme
2. Mr. Blue Sky - E.L.O.
3. Collecting Things
4. Light & Day - The Polyphonic Spree
5. Bookstore
6. It's The Sun (KCRW Morning Becomes Eclectic Version) - The Polyphonic Spree
7. Wada Na Tad - Lata Mangeshkar
8. Showtime
9. Everybody's Gotta Learn Sometimes - Beck
10. Sidewalk Flight
11. Some Kinda Shuffle - Don Nelson
12. Howard Makes It All Go Away
13. Something - The Willowz
14. Postcard
15. I Wonder - The Willowz
16. Peer Pressure
17. A Dream Upon Waking
18. Strings That Tie To You
19. Phone Call
20. Nola's Bounce - Don Nelson
See all 26 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

By JR on June 18 2004
Format: Audio CD
This music may have been very effective in the movie but it doesn't translate at all well to CD. I like Jon Brion and enjoyed his score for Punch Drunk Love but ultimately I found this soundtrack very dull. It's disappointing since the music was one of the things that really stood out for me in the movie. The main problem is that most of the pieces are too short, a few don't go for more than about ten seconds. This is annoying and doesn't allow you really get a feel for the material. Even the lengthier parts are generally cut off just as they are beginning to get interesting, the best example being track 3 (the name escapes me). The only redeeming features of this soundtrack are the first track, "theme", which is an absolutely lovely piano-based piece (I just wish this would have been repeated in different variations, as is the case with a lot of other soundtracks) and the contribution from Beck. I am a big fan of Beck and it's a really good song, though not as good as anything on his Sea Change Album. Some of the other songs just don't fit in with the mood of the score and it all just adds up to a very uneven listening experience. Make sure you give it a listen before you buy as I'm not sure that it would have much replay value for a lot of listeners.
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Format: Audio CD
If you left the theater feeling as liberated and hopeful as Joel and Clem at the end of the film, you'll want to recapture those glorious emotions. Fortunately, you can... musically.
The disc opens with the title theme -- a lazy piano-driven number -- and segues into the deliriously happy "Mr Blue Sky," a tune that will leave you overcome by an impulse to skip down the street, smiling at every stranger you pass. This is the heart of the soundtrack -- a fantastic feel-good song that reminds you, as the movie did, that life is worth living in its entirety, despite any hardships you may encounter. "Light & Day" is a similarly warm, joyful tune that is equally upbeat. Polyphonic Spree's second contribution, "It's the Sun," slows things down a bit, but you'll keep on smilin'. It isn't till you near the close of the disc that the pace starts to drop. However, for once you won't be disappointed. You'll find that the conclusion is as natural as the final yawns that send you to bed at the end of a hectic day.
All in all, one of my favourite buys of 2004 -- vivid, emotional and, above all, real. This could easily be the soundtrack to anyone's life. I highly recommend this selection, as well as the film it accompanied. Five stars and then some.
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By A Customer on March 24 2004
Format: Audio CD
some of the songs aren't perfect, but wow, the ones that are, they hit their mark perfectly.
First off, I must refute the review that said the soundtrack's only hinderance is the willowz songs. I disagree. I think that they reflect the sort of indie punk vibe given off from the film. Not only that, but eh song "Something" is truly great. Its catchy and upbeat.
Not only that, but Beck's cover of "Everybody's Gotta Learn Sometime" by Krogis is beautiful. In the film it comes in at great, meaningful moments, and hearing it on the soundtrack recalls the film well. All in all its a great song.
Finally, the pieces from the film's composer, Jon Brion. Wow, some of them are truly brilliant. "Theme" is the first song and a great use of the minimalist style. "Phone Call", represents a sweet tender, and impossibly unexplainable moment of love from the film. But the song that struck the greatest chord with me (no pun intended), was the song "Peer Pressure". It happens during the scene in the film during which Carrey is wearing a cape, and it completely encapsulates one of the film's messages. The perfection of the love, the trueness of it, is reflected in the simple and moving piano notes, complemented by the building chords (violin?) in the background. Yet, as it peaks, just after its climax, its disolves and distorts into into a mess of noise quite quickly and then cuts out. To me, this symbolizes how the perfection of anything and everything will not last. That eventually that moment of perfection is over-- it has to end.
And what an end it is.
Great Album, better movie.
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By Robert Rabiee on March 16 2004
Format: Audio CD
Multi-instrumentalist/producer/composer/wunderkind Jon Brion represents for Beatles-inspired pop once again with his sublime work on the soundtrack to Michel Gondry's new picture, "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind." Much like his soundtrack to "Punch-Drunk Love," Brion evidences a masterful knowledge of the pop idiom, everything from early-80s power-pop (Beck's Brion-crafted cover of Korgis's "Everybody's Gotta Learn Sometime") to neo-classical string exercises (especially the sublime "Main Titles"). A special treat is his own song, "Strings That Tie To You," which has been circulating on bootlegs for a few years now. The tune, a gentle heartbreak that wouldn't be out of place on one of Elton John's very early records, is as perfect a piece of pop as has been written in the last year. Soundtrack is hindered only by the inclusion of tracks by The Willowz, whose sound detracts from the dream-like quality of the rest of the record. All in all a brilliant outing for Brion & Co., able to stands on its own legs or as a souvenir of the picture.
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