Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Furniture All-New Kindle Paperwhite Music Deals Store Fall Tools
Eugene Onegin: A Novel in Verse (Penguin Classics) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 12.49
  • List Price: CDN$ 16.00
  • You Save: CDN$ 3.51 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Eugene Onegin has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Eugene Onegin Paperback – Nov 25 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 12.49
CDN$ 7.55 CDN$ 10.98

Unlimited FREE Two-Day Shipping for Six Months When You Try Amazon Student


Frequently Bought Together

Eugene Onegin + A Hero of Our Time
Price For Both: CDN$ 28.49

Buy the selected items together



Product Details

Product Description

Review

One of the finest of all verse translations into English ... reproduces every facet of the original: the precise meaning, the wit, the lyricism. Not once is there a false note. -- Robert Chandler Independent

About the Author

Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin was born in Moscow in 1799. He was liberally educated and left school in 1817. Given a sinecure in the Foreign Office, he spent three dissipated years in St Petersburg writing light, erotic and highly polished verse. He flirted with several pre-Decembrist societies, composing the mildly revolutionary verses which led to his disgrace and exile in 1820. After traveling through the Caucasus and the Crimea, he was sent to Bessarabia, where he wrote The Captive of the Caucasus and The Fountain at Bakhchisaray, and began Eugene Onegin. His work took an increasingly serious turn during the last year of his southern exile, in Odessa. In 1824 he was transferred to his parents’ estate at Mikhaylovskoe in north-west Russia, where he spent two solitary but fruitful years during which he wrote his historical drama Boris Godunov, continued Eugene Onegin and finished The Gipsies. After the failure of the Decembrist Revolt in 1825 and the succession of a new tsar, Pushkin was granted conditional freedom in 1826. During the next three years he wandered restlessly between St Petersburg and Moscow. He wrote an epic poem, Poltava, but little else. In 1829 he went with the Russian army to Transcaucasia, and the following year, stranded by a cholera outbreak at the small family estate of Boldino, he wrote his experimental Little Tragedies in blank verse and The Tales of Belkin in prose, and virtually completed Eugene Onegin. In 1831 he married the beautiful Natalya Goncharova. The rest of his life was soured by debts and the malice of his enemies. Although his literary output slackened, he produced his major prose works The Queen of Spades and The Captain’s Daughter, his masterpiece in verse, The Bronze Horseman, important lyrics and fairy tales, including The Tale of the Golden Cockerel. Towards the end of 1836 anonymous letters goaded Pushkin into challenging a troublesome admirer of his wife to a duel. He was mortally wounded and died in January 1837.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
50 of 50 people found the following review helpful
Perhaps the best translation from original masterpice March 8 2010
By Maverick - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Russian is my native language. Having tried to introduce my English speaking children to Pushkin I browsed through number of available translations of Eugene Onegin. I found Stanley Mitchell's translation from the original is being the most accurate and readable. James E. Falen's version is perhaps the next to this one. Nabokov's translation is one of the weakest, in my opinion. It is very hard to convey the prosody and wit of Pushkin for the non-Russian speaker and this translater does a superb job.
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
A close second Dec 3 2012
By Katy001 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This semester, I took up the rather momentous task of reading Eugene Onegin in its original Russian. I used the Kindle Edition of this book as a means of staying on top of the general storyline while analyzing the Russian text. Having read Eugene Onegin once before in translation, I've found that this copy is more accurate and maintains the poetry rather well. While nothing is as beautiful as the original of any work, in my opinion, this translation is a close second.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
One of the best. June 18 2010
By Anonymous Human - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
If you're a fan of Russian literature, Pushkin or poetry, this is a good choice. It just doesn't get any better than Pushkin and this is arguably his best book.

Huge kudos to the translator, who has some serious linguistic talent. This not only translates the story accurately, but the English version makes sense.
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Do not miss it! Feb. 19 2012
By Bibliophile - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I was a bit intimidated at the thought of this Russian poem. But don't be! It's very enjoyable and reads beautifully. I couldn't put it down and finished it in one day! If I had not seen the movie it would have been even better with the added suspense. Do not pass this one by. It's well worth reading and owning.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A true classic Jan. 19 2014
By John T C - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I read this book after watching a movie on the story. One thing for sure is that James Falen did a perfect job on the translation of EUGENE ONEGIN. Much of the Russian nature of glows in this English translation, brining out the humor, wittiness, emotions, grief, sadness and vitality of the original story, which mirrored the Russian society at the time Pushkin lived.
The lessons from the story are strong. Never fight against somebody who is not out to hurt you even if you feel he hurt your pride. That was the case between Eugene and his friend and neighbor Vladimir Lensky, which ends tragically over a nonexistent rivalry over Olga Larin: Another lesson is to appreciate the genuine and selfless love of others for, especially when we are lost in life. That was the case of Olga's sister Tatiana, whom Eugene initially rejects, only to fall in love with her later at a time when she had lost faith in him and had committed herself to a man she did not love but respected. Pushkin himself could be seen in the writing. The loss of what we did not know we loved is the overriding theme in this book. In this direction, there are many lessons to learn from Russia .We can see that in UNION MOUJIK, WAR AND PEACE.I enjoyed reading this book, so if you are undecided about reading it, pick it up and do yourself a favor by knowing about this great work of art.


Feedback