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Evangelism Made Slightly Less Difficult: How to Interest People Who Aren't Interested [Paperback]

Nick Pollard
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Jan. 15 1998
Evangelism is difficult. Face it; most people just aren't interested in hearing about Jesus. They are quite satisfied with their lives, quite content with their beliefs, and see no need to change. So how can you get them interested in the gospel?

In this readable and accessible book, evangelist Nick Pollard shows how to break through the barrier of disinterest. He shows why Jesus can and should make a difference for the people you know. And he shows how you can interest them in learning more about Jesus. Along the way, Pollard examines why people think the way they do and provides help for better understanding and challenging non-Christian worldviews. He also answers sketpics' tough questions, offers practical methods for explaining the gospel, and gives suggestions for leading others in their first steps to faith in Christ.

Evangelism may never be easy. But Nick Pollard's imaginative approach, infectious enthusiasm and field-tested advice will make it slightly less difficult.


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5.0 out of 5 stars Essential Reading for Reasoned Outreach Sept. 25 2002
Format:Paperback
This book is excellent! The writer's contribution to rational evangelism in an increasingly postmodern context is much-needed and very helpful. His "positive deconstruction" is a much better model, in my opinion, than the slick and formulaic evangelism methods often presented in other books. My only regret is that his plan of salvation does not include the necessity of baptism (immersion). Although he quotes from Acts 2:37-38, he glosses over the baptism portion, making it only a public confession of faith. The rest was quite good, and I plan to reread it again soon and take notes!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Thoughtful Witness Sept. 22 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
What I love about Pollard's book, is that it is not simply about apologetics or learning "techniques" on how to do evangelism. It is really about learning the art of dialogue and how to engage those who come from completely different worldviews. This is an honest and forthright book, written by an author who does not claim to know all the answers, but really knows how to humbly engage non-Christians in real dialogue. I loved this book. I think that it should be must reading for any Evangelical Christian who ministers to skeptics.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Thoughtful Witness Sept. 22 2000
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
What I love about Pollard's book, is that it is not simply about apologetics or learning "techniques" on how to do evangelism. It is really about learning the art of dialogue and how to engage those who come from completely different worldviews. This is an honest and forthright book, written by an author who does not claim to know all the answers, but really knows how to humbly engage non-Christians in real dialogue. I loved this book. I think that it should be must reading for any Evangelical Christian who ministers to skeptics.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reaching out in love... July 15 2007
By Mike Parks - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book will help you engage your friends on an intellectual level and help you continue your conversations. Nick Pollard does not take a "shotgun" approach to evangelism, but attempts to teach his readers how to engage their friends in conversations that will lead to the gospel presentation.

I would not say that Pollards book is a cut and dry apologetics book. However, he does provide answers to some commonly asked questions. This book is more about reaching out to the ones you love and trying to engage those who do not want to talk about Christ.

Nick introduces his readers to what he calls "positive deconstruction." I like this approach, we must proclaim the gospel, but at the same time, you can positively show your friends the errors of their worldview. This is done by asking the proper questions to allow the wheel of the mind to begin turning. This book will introduce you to the concept, but after reading it, you will want to examine other worldviews. I would recommend picking up a copy of, "The Compact Guide To World Religions." Like Pollards, it's presented from an evangelical perspective and will provide you with good questions to ask your friends.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Gospel Examined Truthfully Nov. 10 2006
By Bradley B. Penner - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book fulfilled the authors intent, to make the readier think and empower the reader with a new tool for effective evangelisim thus making it a bit less difficult. His experience as an evangelist is not only very powerful, but very gracious. His intent is to empower non-believers to be able to become so curious about the gospel, they can't help but examine the truth truthfully.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another good resource for everyday evangelism July 26 2007
By Vic Bernales - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I like his starting point: prayer and evangelism. I definitely agree that prayer for evangelistic opportunity to come and to be able to share the gospel clearly is very important as we engage in proclaiming the good news of Jesus Christ. As Pollard points it out, the Apostle Paul begs his fellow believers in Colosse to pray for him this kind of prayer. That's why he got my attention right away, especially when he asks about our feelings in praying 'that God may open door' for evangelism. We Christians are not really keen in praying this prayer because we are scared God will answer it and we don't know what to do next. But if we are really serious about evangelism, we must be earnestly praying for such opportunities and God's enabling for He alone is able to give us wisdom and courage, by His Spirit, to present Christ to others. I find his remaining discussion in Chapter 1 both challenging and comforting. He says, in effect, "Pray for opportunity and evangelize wisely, making the most of every opportunity by helping people in the best way possible." I also like what he said about evangelism, "Evangelism isn't just about saying certain things. It's about being a certain person and living in a certain way" (23).
One of the questions I've posted before moving to the main parts of the book was, "How can we be equipped to help people in the more normal day by day situations?" Then he says, "We must be able to answer their genuine questions" (27). But my question was, "How? Show me!" The rest of the book just opened up the answers like a curtain being raised in a theater so one can clearly see the movie or play.
Pollard's method is very helpful. He goes on that if we can help others start to like finding out Jesus, they might most likely listen to the gospel proclamation. And where should we start when people are beginning to like listening the gospel? Nick Pollard suggests that the starting points in doing evangelism are, first, clear understanding of the gospel; then, clear understanding of the person we are trying to help (102). Unless we are clear in these we would not be able to present the gospel well.
In the latter part of the book Pollard suggests that when we account for the hope we have in Christ, we must tell the truth and at the same time acknowledge there are mysteries we don't know, including the mystery of evil and suffering in the world. And he has a good chapter on dealing with the question of suffering. When people ask questions, we must also try to know why they ask such questions, that is, we need to look for the question behind the question (125). Clear understanding of other's question can help us a lot in giving the right answer. However, in answering other's questions, the author is right to caution us that we don't need to force others to agree with us.
Lastly, what I also like in his approach is the recognition that in evangelism we are not alone. God the Holy Spirit guides and leads us. He empowers us and He speaks through us. Like others, I came up with a resolution to recommend it for Christian who desires to reach out to both skeptics and uninterested with the gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ. Lots of insights on evangelism are in this book.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How evangelism SHOULD be. Feb. 19 2011
By Craig Huggart - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
For several months now I've been reading books and praying and talking to others about how to share my faith in an awesome and caring God. I have read a bunch of books that all have their good points. Another book that I would recommend is Out of the Salt Shaker by Pippert.

If I had to recommend one book on evangelism, this would be it.

It is real. It is practical. It is a great balance between Word and Spirit, prayer and action. I love it.

If you long to share your faith but have trouble doing it, check this book out. You won't regret it.
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