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The Everything Vegetarian Pressure Cooker Cookbook Paperback – Sep 18 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Adams Media; abridged edition edition (Sept. 18 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1440506728
  • ISBN-13: 978-1440506727
  • Product Dimensions: 20.3 x 1.8 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 726 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #337,666 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Amy Snyder has worked at vegetarian restaurants, including Real Food Daily in Los Angeles and Georgia's The Grit. Her experiences with vegetarian cuisine are what led Snyder to write The VegCooking Blog, which receives more than 50,000 visits per month.

Justin Snyder has worked in kitchens professionally for the past sixteen years. As a longtime vegetarian, Justin currently works as saute chef at Cafe Intermezzo.


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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 29 reviews
34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
This book, is a pressure cooking adventure!!! Oct. 14 2010
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even if you like meat, this book will teach you how the pressure cooker can expand your cooking through grains, beans, vegetables, and other exotic and wonderful ingredients! From Spain, to the Middle East, to deep down in the heart of The great U.S. of A, Amy and Justin Snyder are about to take you and your pressure cooker, on a tasty and adventurous journey...

Vegans, Vegetarians, and Lacto-ovo-fish-eating-Vegetarians... REJOICE with your pressure cookers, for this book is a keeper!

1) YUM! I have tried over 10 recipes, and they've all turned out great. From Hummus, to potato skins, to stock, to marinara, to corn, to brussell sprouts (oh yum), to ratatouille, to lemon butter broccoli, to Aloo Gobi, to Chorizo Paella!, and on and on. The Snyders have taken me on a gastronomic adventure since cracking open their book. These are not just pressure cooker recipes, they are exquisite and complex dishes that taste great, and that happen to utilize the p-cooker to shortcut your cuisine to perfection.

2) Technique: This book does an excellent job at easing you into p-cooking technique, and incorporating THAT into your cooking. So I am not a vegan being led to water, but a vegan being taught to fish, so to speak (or am I a vegetarian or lacto-ovo-fish-eating vegan? I can't remember...They explain it early in the 1st chapter. Digression aside...). So, for example, soaking and cooking down beans are explained in every recipe that calls for it, in such a clear and concise manner, that it becomes second nature. Rice and grains are easy to understand and work with. Each element is incorporated into the recipes in the same text and explanation as the previous recipe. Meaning, you walk away with understanding the technique of using the p-cooker, and not just memorizing recipes and ingredients. Well written.

3) Not JUST vegetables: I loved, loved, LOVED that the Snyders added a section on Veggie-burger, Tempeh, Tofu, and Seitan (seita-what?)... You see, these are all substitute meat products that vegetarians use in their cooking. They can look, taste, chew, and feel very similar to meat. That means, that you can cook dishes with them, that were otherwise not accessible to vegetarians. And, because pressure cookers are such one-pot wonders for meat-based meals, like beef stew, or perhaps pulled pork, us veganish peeps are now back in the game! I truly have learned a whole new world that I did not know, before buying this book. Seitan, especially, I find absolutely fascinating. I cut my thumb 3 weeks ago, so I have not yet gotten around to kneading wheat in the sink yet, but I love that the Snyders chose to write about these, as part of pressure cooker cookbook! I am reading and wondering, and excited about what is in store when I do finally dive in and get jiggy with my seitan. That's brilliant.

Overall, this book is excellent, and fits my needs, and I am sure it will enlighten you as well. If you are either a vegetarian, leaning there, or looking to expand your horizons beyond meat and chicken, then this is not just a cookbook, it's a pressure-cooking adventure.

5 stars. Enjoy.
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Good vegetarian pressure cooker cookbook--but with a few issues Aug. 20 2011
By S. Quinn - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This cookbook is a good, but not great, companion to the pressure cooker cookbooks I own that were written by Lorna Sass: "Great Vegetarian Cooking Under Pressure" and "Cooking Under Pressure". What keeps this cookbook from being a great pressure cooker cookbook is the fact that small steps have been omitted from some of the recipes, such as draining and reserving the cooking liquid when cooking beans for refried beans--before mashing the beans. Also, some recipes only require one ingredient to be cooked in the pressure cooker, and then then rest of the ingredients are cooked in a separate pan or mixed together and cooked in the oven. That said, it is great that the authors give options for making each recipe vegan.

I would definitely recommend this book, but with the caveat that the reader be prepared to think through the recipe steps to make sure that none are omitted. In addition, I would also recommend that anyone who is interested in vegetarian pressure cooking purchase a copy of "Great Vegetarian Cooking Under Pressure" by Lorna Sass, who is a pressure cooker guru.
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
My pressure cooker no longer lives in the garage!! Sept. 24 2010
By Susan L - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love this cookbook - especially since it has vegan options for every recipe. Simple to follow, delicious and haven't found a bad one yet. My poor neglected pressure cooker is now in use at least 2 or 3 times a week.
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Sloppy, slack, slipshod, slovenly, slapdash . . . Nov. 30 2013
By PeteChi - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I should have taken more seriously the previous reviewer who called this recipe book 'sloppy.' Instead, I purchased it because there are so few recipe books specific to vegetarian pressure cooking and I thought I could get past any sloppiness. I selected Red Lentil Curry as my first recipe from this book. I should have known when I read to add the "garilc" that this was one of the sloppier ones. Nearing the end, I thought to myself that there seems to be a step missing, but I forged ahead. Sure enough, when I was done, it was an inedible mess. A quick search on the Internet turned up the exact same recipe except that the Internet recipe contained the missing ingredient and step: the addition of 28 oz. of vegetable broth. That makes quite a difference, folks. Also, lots of the recipes in this book suggest using the basic vegetable stock recipe on page 29. It is a preposterous recipe which, among a few other ingredients, calls for 2 large onions and a whole BULB of garlic using only 4 1/2 cups of water?? I've never heard of such a wasteful recipe.
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Quick and Delicious! Sept. 25 2010
By Oscar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Good cookbook - I've made a lot of the Indian recipes, and the garden marinara sauce, which was delicious. Haven't tried any of the desserts yet (I usually judge a book on how good the desserts are, as these usually require the most precision), but I've been happy with what I have made. I like that the book is separated into food groups - it makes it easier to find a recipe; however, I do wish there were more glossy pictures, as that tends to sway me as to whether I will make something.


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