Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Everything in Winnipeg Begins in a Car: Stories Paperback – Jan 1 1994


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Jan 1 1994
"Please retry"
CDN$ 10.00 CDN$ 9.50

2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please, the eagerly anticipated first book from Amy Poehler, the Golden Globe winning star of Parks and Recreation, is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Join Amazon Student in Canada



Product Details

  • Paperback: 80 pages
  • Publisher: Black Moss Press; 1st Edition edition (Jan. 1 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0887532470
  • ISBN-13: 978-0887532474
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 0.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 299 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,823,669 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

THIS IS A cunning idea for a book, an ingenious literary conceit. Together, the six stories in Martin Waxman's Everything in Winnipeg Begins in a Car combine to create the biography of a young man whom their author dubs "a nerdy Robert de Niro," one Paul Samuels of Winnipeg. Slightly sad and a little goofy all at once, the stories manage to merge nostalgia with low comedy and genuine sentiment with terrible automotive puns ("Paul was not a good fender"; "Drive is what he lacks.")

Samuels is conceived in a car; becomes an in utero member of a three-vehicle procession driving from Winnipeg to Minneapolis for a family wedding; makes the same trip over again at 14 and falls in love; has miserable dating experiences in cars until he thinks, "This car knows so much about me, it's embarrassing to be seen in it in public," and dies in a car accident at 35 after he's made the break with home by moving to Toronto.

Somehow, Waxman actually makes us feel sorry for his hapless hero; his mistakes with women are so richly ludicrous, his homesickness for his hopelessly possessive parents so genuine. What all this goes to prove, suggests Waxman with clever tongue firmly planted in cheek, is that you can take the boy out of Winnipeg but you can never, ever, take Winnipeg out of the boy. Especially a boy who's "turned in the wrong direction and ... can't figure out how to get back." Pat Barclay(Books in Canada) -- Books in Canada

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Look for similar items by category


Feedback