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Evil Under The Sun Paperback – Feb 3 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (MM); Open market ed edition (Feb. 3 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425129608
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425129609
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 10.5 x 16.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 136 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (36 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #633,063 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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First Sentence
WHEN Captain Roger Angmering built himself a house in the year 1782 on the island off Leather-combe Bay, it was thought the height of eccentricity on his part. Read the first page
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4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
I love the way Hercule Poirot just hangs around sipping tisane, watching people and then loitering about, handy when they are murdered. He is a classic golden age sleuth and I gather Agatha Christie couldn't stand him but the books are well worth reading. If a good murder mystery is ultimately about the restoration of order on chaos then Poirot is the ideal detective. His fussy ways and OCD humanism are agents of order in the universe. In this book Arlena Marshall tempts the Gods and is destroyed. She is a victim and Poirot looks upon the apparently benign cast and sees what lies beneath. Christie always teased readers with hints at her dark vision. We envision the elderly drinking tea while reading through owlish glasses, eyes wide with anticipation. But I think that everyone can find themselves by the seaside (in their heads) wondering about the nature of evil and whodunit.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michele L. Worley on March 23 2002
Format: Audio CD
The stories herein first appeared in various magazines; they're sorted here by original publication date rather than order of appearance in the book.
"The King of Clubs" - (March, 1923) Valerie Saintclair, the famous dancer, has just been all over the papers, having discovered the murdered body of Henry Reedburn. Prince Paul of Maurania comes to Poirot, since he proposes to marry her, saying (in one breath), "We are living now in more enlightened days, free from the old caste prejudices," while *also* saying that 1) it'll be a morganatic marriage (i.e., the children would be out of the succession), and 2) it doesn't matter because she's actually the daughter of a Russian grand duchess. (He says that she's bound to secrecy, but has let him guess that much).
In other words, Prince Paul is a pompous idiot, who half-suspects Mlle. Saintclair of murdering Reedburn, based on her reaction to a fortuneteller's card reading turning up the king of clubs (a fearsome man holding her in his power), and he's hiring Poirot to find out what really happened. (If you have even a passing acquaintance with that method of fortunetelling, incidentally, don't let Christie's misuse of terms distract you from the facts of the case.)
"The Affair at the Victory Ball" - (March, 1923) The Victory in question was the end of WW I. Young Lord Cronshaw and his fiancee Coco Courtenay attended the ball with several friends, all dressed as characters from the Italian Comedy, he as Harlequin, she as Columbine, and both died that night, she from a cocaine overdose in her flat, he with a table knife through his heart at the ball. (There are no Quin or Satterthwaite appearances, incidentally, despite the Harlequin references.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Austin on March 6 2003
Format: Audio CD
As an example of how ingeniously a whodunit might be plotted, and how expertly an audio book might be read, this package could hardly be bettered.
Agatha Christie wrote "Evil Under the Sun" in the early 1940s. It was a time when the second world war had brought widespread misery, pain and austerity. A welcome antidote, therefore was to devise a little budget-priced escapism, to depict a group of guests at a sea-side holiday resort relaxing and exchanging gossip and tittle-tattle as they overlook a beach and the bathers who are using it.
The inane gossip and the lack of suspense in the opening pages might wear your patience, but keep alert! Many significant clues are scattered here.
The subsequent murder and the possible motivation relate mainly to a context of human relationships. A drug smuggling racket is occasionally suggested. Hercule Poirot is present, of course, to lead police, readers, and everybody else to the solution of the mystery, even if he needs to ruin a good pair of shoes and risk seasickness during the hunt.
Addictive and ingenious as her books can be, Agatha Christie's prose and dialogue are not renowned for literary merit. All the more remarkable, therefore, is the contribution of David Suchet. Such is the reading of the great British actor that the banal is transformed into the brilliant, the commonplace into the courtly, and the mediocre into the memorable.
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By A Customer on May 14 2004
Format: Audio Cassette
I highly recommend the audio book read by David Suchet. You won't believe the voices that he can give these characters. It really makes the book come alive. He's a class act.
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Format: School & Library Binding
This Hercule Poirot mystery is set on an island resort. In this exotic setting, the vacationers watch each other, and learn a bit about each other's history and personalities - and gossip about the flamboyant, and possibly unfaithful wife, of one of the guests. When she's found dead, the investigation shows the guests have many secrets - suspicions of murder, financial difficulties, previous romantic entanglements with other guests.
As is typical of many Christie stories, it's one of those secrets that is key to solving the mystery.
Classic Christie puzzle plot with engaging characters. Well-written and a very enjoyable read. Recommended.
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Format: Paperback
Written in 1941 this is not Agatha Christie's best book, but it is right up there at the top. I highly recommend this as a book to take on your next beach vacation! It follows a theme also found in A Caribbean Mystery, that you don't really know the people you meet on holiday. (It really gets you thinking about that couple you had dinner with last night.) Set on the English coast outside Devon, Evil takes place in an island resort and is filled with such typically British characters you'll find yourself reaching for the suntan lotion and craving tea and cakes as you read it. Even if you're not on vacation, Evil Under the Sun is a bright spot for any day.
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