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Evolutionary Ecology across Three Trophic Levels: Goldenrods, Gallmakers, and Natural Enemies (MPB-29) [Hardcover]

Warren G. Abrahamson , Arthur E. Weis
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Book Description

May 12 1997 Monographs in Population Biology (Book 29)

In a work that will interest researchers in ecology, genetics, botany, entomology, and parasitology, Warren Abrahamson and Arthur Weis present the results of more than twenty-five years of studying plant-insect interactions. Their study centers on the ecology and evolution of interactions among a host plant, the parasitic insect that attacks it, and the suite of insects and birds that are the natural enemies of the parasite. Because this system provides a model that can be subjected to experimental manipulations, it has allowed the authors to address specific theories and concepts that have guided biological research for more than two decades and to engage general problems in evolutionary biology.

The specific subjects of research are the host plant goldenrod (Solidago), the parasitic insect Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae) that induces a gall on the plant stem, and a number of natural enemies of the gallfly. By presenting their detailed empirical studies of the Solidago-Eurosta natural enemy system, the authors demonstrate the complexities of specialized enemy-victim interactions and, thereby, the complex interactive relationships among species more broadly. By utilizing a diverse array of field, laboratory, behavioral, genetic, chemical, and statistical techniques, Abrahamson and Weis present the most thorough study to date of a single system of interacting species. Their interest in the evolutionary ecology of plant-insect interactions leads them to insights on the evolution of species interactions in general. This major work will interest anyone involved in studying the ways in which interdependent species interact.


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"In a writing style both consistent and fluid, Abrahamson and Weis weave a story that includes the ecology, evolution, systematics, physiology, behavior, molecular and developmental biology, and genetics of their system. Throughout, the excellent illustrations and detailed citations help to draw parallels with other studies, and place their research within current theories of insect-plant interactions. This is a must-read for serious students of evolutionary biology and the scientific method."--Ecoscience

From the Publisher

In a work that will interest researchers in ecology, genetics, botany, entomology, and parasitology, Warren Abrahamson and Arthur Weis present the results of more than twenty-five years of studying plant-insect interactions. Their study centers on the ecology and evolution of interactions among a host plant, the parasitic insect that attacks it, and the suite of insects and birds that are the natural enemies of the parasite. Because this system provides a model that can be subjected to experimental manipulations, it has allowed the authors to address specific theories and concepts that have guided biological research for more than two decades and to engage general problems in evolutionary biology. The specific subjects of research are the host plant goldenrod (Solidago), the parasitic insect Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae) that induces a gall on the plant stem, and a number of natural enemies of the gallfly. By presenting their detailed empirical studies of the Solidago-Eurosta natural enemy system, the authors demonstrate the complexities of specialized enemyvictim interactions and, thereby, the complex interactive relationships among species more broadly. By utilizing a diverse array of field, laboratory, behavioral, genetic, chemical, and statistical techniques, Abrahamson and Weis present the most thorough study to date of a single system of interacting species. Their interest in the evolutionary ecology of plantinsect interactions leads them to insights on the evolution of species interactions in general. This major work will interest anyone involved in studying the ways in which interdependent species interact. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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For anyone likely to pick up this book, it is unnecessary to document the diversity in the natural histories of the several millions of species inhabiting earth. Read the first page
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5.0 out of 5 stars Life outlook altering!!! Stunning! June 22 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This ecological masterpiece is essential to our research here at Bucknell University. Their work with the ball-gall fly and goldenrod is methodical and illustrates the details of the plant/animal interaction. This is a must read for anyone interested in plant-insect interactions! M.B and L.Y.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Life outlook altering!!! Stunning! June 22 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This ecological masterpiece is essential to our research here at Bucknell University. Their work with the ball-gall fly and goldenrod is methodical and illustrates the details of the plant/animal interaction. This is a must read for anyone interested in plant-insect interactions! M.B and L.Y.
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