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Excel 2000 VBA: Programmers Reference [Paperback]

John Green , Stephen Bullen , Felipe Martins , Brian Johnson
3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 59.99
Price: CDN$ 37.79 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Book Description

June 12 1999 Programmer's Reference
What is this book about?

Excel 2000 is an important part of the Office 2000 program suite, and will be available in the Premium, Professional, Standard and Small Business editions of Office 2000. Excel has traditionally been the Office suite spreadsheet program par excellence. It still remains that way, but with Office 2000 there is a strong emphasis on between-application automation, ease of use, and the smart new bells and whistles that 2000 brings.

Using VBA (Visual Basic for Applications), the user can program his or her own programs in what is essentially a subset of the Visual Basic programming languages. This is tremendously powerful, as it allows you to create great User Interfaces (forms etc), as a front end to actual spreadsheet and database storage and manipulation. This continues to be one of the great strengths of programming Excel VBA.

What does this book cover?

This book presents a full reference to the Excel object model — which is essentially the object-oriented system of organizing the functional capacities that make up the Excel program. There is a short introduction to VBA itself, and the rest of the book documents aspects of programming Excel through that object model.

This book is in three broad sections:

  • The first part introduces Excel and VBA.
  • The second offers interesting, thematic discussions of some of the capacities available to Excel VBA.
  • The third and final part offers a full reference to the object model of Excel.

Who is this book for?

This book is for the Excel developer or user who already has a knowledge of spreadsheets, and the basic objects of an Excel spreadsheet, and now wants a solid and detailed reference to the main object models present in the Excel structure with examples of how to use these models.


Product Details


Product Description

From Amazon

Wrox's growing reputation for putting out well-organised, detail-rich books for programmers gets a boost from Excel 2000 VBA Programmer's Reference. This book--a tutorial as well as a reference--holds a wealth of chewy facts that Excel developers will find very valuable.

The tutorial, accounting for half of the book, covers the various mechanisms available for referring to particular files, sheets, cells and ranges of cells. It also addresses the graphical representation of data--particularly in charts--and explains the most important aspects of controls and the events they generate. Green--unlike many VBA authors--covers internationalisation issues in considerable depth. This is the best VBA book on the market for those planning to write programs for a multilingual usage of Excel. There is also a VBA primer that covers critical VBA syntax and the essentials of object-orientation as it applies to the Excel environment.

The two reference sections--one for Excel's VBA objects and one for the VBA Extensibility (VBE) environment--make up the last half of Excel 2000 VBA Programmer's Reference. The references are comprehensive, but they're organised in a strange way--they list properties, methods and events with their names, return data types and descriptions in columns. This would be okay, but when an object's list of members extends over several pages it's impossible to be immediately sure of which object the list refers to. The object name ought to appear on each page. --David Wall --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Publisher

This book is for the Excel developer or user who already has a knowledge of spreadsheets, and the basic objects of an Excel spreadsheet, and now wants a solid and detailed reference to the main object models present in the Excel structure with examples of how to use these models. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
Excel made its debut on the Macintosh in 1985 and has never lost its position as the most popular spreadsheet application in the Mac environment. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Read for anyone who uses Excel Oct. 20 2003
Format:Paperback
By far my favorite programming book, and here's my explanation:
I'm not sure if some of the people reviewing this book were supposed to be reading John Green's "Excel 2000 VBA : Programmers Reference" in the first place. If you have never used Excel, or never written your own script or program before, THIS BOOK IS NOT FOR YOU. This book was written for those who are either knowledgeable in Excel, wishing to learn programming, or vice versa, and its BY FAR THE BEST way to get there.
To give this book anything less than four stars (and I personally give it five) shows a complete lack of basic Excel and/or programming comprehension.
Excel 2000 VBA: Programmer's Reference starts with the basic concepts of functions (Subs), variables, loops, if statements, etc. But just like any other book from any other programming languange, don't expect to be fluent after reading the first 2 chapters.
Take time each day to read as much as you can, and run the examples in the VB editor. I have done 90% of the examples in the book, adapting many of them for my own use. Studying this text cover to cover is the best way to read it, as it is structured much like any college math course, where each chapter builds upon the chapter that precedes it. So avoid reading this book like an encyclopædia, as it will leave holes in your knowledge of the Excel Object Model.
The in-depth explanations of advanced concepts such as dynamic arrays, object referencing, names, API calls, and many more untapped resources of Excel are what make this book head and shoulders above the rest.
The index can be problematic for those not experienced in Object-Oriented programming, as it is organized by object types, and not alphabetically by each object.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Seems like it is missing some basics Aug. 19 2002
Format:Paperback
I needed more detail on how to get the code in the book to run. The book has lots of code examples, but I rarely could get them to run. I think I needed more upfront information about where the code needs to go in the Visual Basic Editor, do I tie it to a sheet, the application or what. The index is also a little weak.
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By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is obviously a WROX attempt at creating an O'Reilly "Nutshell" book and I think they did a great job, sans the index which is totally awful. NOTE: While I don't have it, the index for the comparable WROX book for Excel XP/2002 looked 200% better. Nonetheless it is what it is, a REFERENCE book with the bonus that you don't normally see in O'Reilly books, of an in-depth explanation of some of Excel's object models in the earlier chapters. The chapters on the Range object model are worth the cost alone!
I had VBA experience with Access but very little with Excel. Within 1 month of utilizing this book, I was able to to show my employer that I deserved the new consultation job at a major pharmaceutical company and got it.
While the index is very poor, this is an excellent REFERENCE book, even for beginners and those working with Excel 97. Most of what is in the book applies to '97 as well. The price, like most WROX books, is also very reasonable, especially for the content. You will need an Internet Service Provider to download the code examples in the earlier parts of the book though, another reason it only gets 4 stars. I don't agree, especially since anyone can buy a burnable CD for less than .25 now, with the philosophy that it substantially adds to the cost. Given most book publishers inclusion of a CD, I would think WROX would augment the quality of their publications by including the CD of source code/information for a nominal increased price. The costs involved are extremely reasonable to the business standards of their industry.
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4.0 out of 5 stars COMMENTS FROM A BEGINNER June 10 2002
Format:Paperback
AT LAST!!!, a reliable reference BOOK. A self-taught VBA programmer, I know well the frustration of relying on Microsoft's 'help' for Visual Basic in Excel. Not knowing what to ask makes Microsoft's search engines just about useless, and the use of generic names for objects and variables in examples only adds to the confusion. Microsoft's 'on-line' manual lacks detail, adequate exemples, and is cumbersum when trying to review a previous sections.
Green's Excel 2000 VBA Programmers Reference has opened an entire new world for me as a programmer. Green approaches Excel 2000 VBA assuming the reader knows nothing. He presents one simple block of information at a time in a logical, building-block outline and avoids overwhelming the reader. His examples use actual code that when typed in, provide an instant result.
Green does a fair job in the daunting task of providing a quick reference to code through logical grouping, Table of Contents, Index, and page headings. However, to achieve the best results from Green's book, the reader must 'read' the book from start to finish otherwise, you'll be just as lost, maybe not as confused, as using Microsoft's on-line help. Green's organization is such that once finished, the reader will at least know which chapter to start looking for the right information.
I have been an avid supporter of Microsoft Office suites and firmly believe their potential goes largely untapped by businesses costing them thousands, if not millions of dollars in lost production and through the purchase of software which can be done by MS Office. Green's book allowed me to compose a script which translated data from an old database management system to a new system - a process which was quite complex in some areas.
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Most recent customer reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Horrible index
This book would have gotten 4 stars from me if it were not for the index. For example, in one short block of code, I tried looking up Resize, What:, LookAt, xlWhole, LookIn, and... Read more
Published on April 8 2002 by Polymath-In-Training
5.0 out of 5 stars Lifesaver
I was thrown into a contract position programming Excel 97 (yeah, i know). I thought i would just get in there, and code up some sweetness and be done. Read more
Published on March 16 2002 by "enfranchise"
4.0 out of 5 stars More useful than I'd hoped
I had expected a simple, straitforward reference book, yet it goes the extra mile by explaining important concepts superbly. I use it now, more than I had thought I would. Read more
Published on March 5 2002 by mattgb1
3.0 out of 5 stars Not for learning VBA - poor index also
As the title states, it is a programmer's reference. Do not buy this book if you need to learn VBA. Also, it had many good tips, but I was not able to find them again with the... Read more
Published on Nov. 26 2001
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent - It never leaves my desk...
The book is an excellent reference for Intermediate and Advanced VBA developers. I started programming with Excel 95. Personally, I prefer the Wrox books over Walkenbach anyday. Read more
Published on Oct. 13 2001 by Adria Bynum
5.0 out of 5 stars A great resource for a developing Excel programmer.
Those with no programming backround may find this a little advanced. I first read Walkenbach's Power Programming for Excel 2000 which was very good and then followed with this book... Read more
Published on Sept. 5 2001 by John A. Bigness
1.0 out of 5 stars "Pass this book and buy something else"
I have had high expectations towards this book. After reading a few chapters, I found this book a difficult to follow. I had expected a self-study guide, but I was wrong. Read more
Published on July 2 2001
1.0 out of 5 stars skip this book
I had a really a high expectations towards this book However, after reading a few chapters I realized that this is not a good guide for a self-study. Read more
Published on June 30 2001
4.0 out of 5 stars Excelent Value
Many programmers are not satisfied that their programs work, but they also want to know if the techniques they employ are the most efficient, or if there is a better means of doing... Read more
Published on June 8 2001 by "klic"
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